Buy New
$27.00
Qty:1
  • List Price: $30.00
  • Save: $3.00 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Sensate Culture: West... has been added to your Cart
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Sensate Culture: Western Civilization between Chaos and Transformation Paperback – January 15, 2007


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$27.00
$27.00 $8.43
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock Pub (January 15, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1556351887
  • ISBN-13: 978-1556351884
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 6.3 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,775,023 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The Sensate Culture: Western Civilization Between Chaos And Transformation is a probing work grappling with the reasons so many moderns worship the sensuous, the material, the merely colossal -- but still feel empty and shallow. Building on the work of the late Pitirim Sorokin, Harold Brown finds the roots of cultural disintegration in the abandonment of the spiritual dimension. The author shows how most societies have descended from spiritual values to a period like our own, when materialism and sensuality rule. The result will be not just apostasy, but revolution, and the collapse of civilization. However, this need not be inevitable. The profound connections The Sensate Culture makes between Christianity and culture are accessible to every thoughtful person who takes seriously the crises faced by a world spinning out of control. -- Midwest Book Review --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Richard R. Blake TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 19, 2013
Format: Paperback
In the years since Dr. Harold O. J. Brown's publication of "The Sensate Culture," although, we have been faced with additional disintegration, there are also signs of progress.

Brown's writing is still relevant, prophetic, and controversial. Brown develops a comprehensive analysis of the works of Pitirim Sorokin. He describes the crisis in arts, religion, ethics, and law; the impact on sociocultural disintegration and the crisis in education, medicine, and democratic theory.

I appreciated the rich bibliography, additional sources of material introduced in the context of his study, from futurologist, demographers, sociologists, and historians. I only wish he had devoted a bigger percentage of his work to the hope for a new beginning, a reawakening and renewal, and promise.

"A Culture in Chaos and Crisis" is worthy of consideration for a modern-day Christian thinkers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Dave Kresta (davek@model.com) on February 20, 1998
Format: Hardcover
An interesting analysis of our culture. But Sorokin's paradigm of three steps to cultural disintegration (idealistic, ideational, sensate) is applied too broadly. At times it felt like Brown was fitting the square peg of this theory into every round hole that could be found. The examples started to get laborious to read through, with Brown spending too much time presenting data that fit the three step paradigm and not enough time analyzing things more broadly. If Brown would have condensed this thing to 100 pages or less, it would have still served it's purpose of alerting us to the progression history has seen in previous eras. At 250+ pages it should have moved well beyond the simple three-step theory.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By grapabo on April 3, 2004
Format: Hardcover
The subject matter of the book is familiar: many books have been written by pundits who have observed a general and long-running decline in Western culture: an egalitarian mood eschews rewarding or acknowledging excellence; all views in public, whether deserved or not, are given equal standing, while at the same time criticism of such syncretism is denounced as "judgmentalism"; materialism replaces a vigorous spiritual and moral foundation for the culture, while the idea of a transcendent moral culture is censored from public discussion. Individual autonomy that is taken to absolute proportions, regardless of the consequences, triumphs over attempts by the government to keep order. While many of these experts adequately describe the problem, the options on what can be done about it are more limited in range.
Brown approaches the problem through a prism that, while it was not of his own invention, nevertheless provides fruitful insight into the current problems. The paradigm adopted by Brown was created by mid-20th century sociologist Pitrim Sorokin in Crisis of Our Age (which debt Brown expressly acknowledges early in the book), which measures the life of cultures as passing between three stages: ideational (eyes turned only toward God apart from the earthly realm), idealistic (eyes turned toward the earthly things as expressions of the beauty of God's creation), and the sensate (eyes turned toward the earthly things for only the sensory satisfaction in itself). The stages do not necessarily evolve (or devolve) in only one direction, which makes the analysis more interesting as a means to grapple with the problems of the sensate culture that Brown posits Western culture is or is close to transforming into.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?