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The Sentinels of Andersonville Hardcover – January 17, 2014


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers, Inc. (January 17, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1414359489
  • ISBN-13: 978-1414359489
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.2 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (135 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #371,284 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

When Emery Jones, an idealistic Confederate soldier, finally captures a Union soldier after a long standoff, he comes to respect his adversary on the trek to the infamous Andersonville prison and vows that he will be safe. When Emery meets Dance Pickett, an aristocratic Southern militiaman and the estranged son of a famous father, he discovers a kindred soul who believes that the Union prisoners are also God’s children. Violet Stiles, who has devised a way to make much-needed buttons for the Confederate soldiers, goes to Andersonville seeking a shipment of supplies, and sees starving, dying, and dead Union soldiers. Appalled that her beloved father, a physician who volunteers there, hasn’t done more, she decides to form a group to feed the prisoners, only to discover that doing the right thing can have unexpectedly difficult repercussions. Groot’s three young Southern protagonists find friendship and love in the midst of adversity as they follow the moral path, even though it may mean death and dishonor. Groot’s (Stones of My Accusers, 2004) well-researched, inspirational historical tale, with its frank depiction of the atrocities at Andersonville and realistic portrayal of characters who question what it truly means to be Christian, will be compelling and memorable for a diverse audience. --Diana Tixier Herald

Review

"The Sentinels of Andersonville is Tracy Groot's beautifully written retelling of an age-old story of the triumph of compassion in the midst of horror and evil. Set in and around the Andersonville Prison, the lives of three Southerners converge as they plot to save a friend. Transformation and redemption are at the heart of The Sentinels of Andersonville. Tracy Groot proves to be first-rate storyteller." New York Times Best-Selling Author, Robert HicksThe Widow of the South and A Separate Country

"A poignant, heartwarming story of how human kindness and the willingness to take risks can make a difference."
James. M. McPherson, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Battle Cry of Freedom


Author Tracy Groot has "Good historical homework",  "Memorable characters whose anguish is palpable", is "Page-turning", and has "A good instinct".
 Publisher's Weekly Starred Review, Nov '13 


EDITOR'S CHOICE! - "This novel is a stirring story that demands to be read in one sitting because readers won't want to leave these unforgettable characters, and Tracy Groot could not have done a better job with this topic. Even while giving us horrifying visions of "fence-posts" of dead soldiers, we still cannot help but reach for that ultimate gift of a happily- ever-after. The Sentinels of Andersonville is a wonderfully powerful and evocative story that I would recommend to any historical fiction fan."
Historical Novel Society, UK, Feb '14

"Well-researched, inspirational historical tale...compelling and memorable for a diverse audience."
Booklist Review, Jan '14

“It’s Andersonville. Men die for no meaning.” Such is the overwhelming impression felt while reading Tracy Groot’s The Sentinels of Andersonville (Tyndale House, $24.99, 368 pages, ISBN 9781414359489), which focuses on the evils both within and without the infamous Civil War prison. Yankee soldiers died by the thousands in squalid conditions that Groot describes with a deft accuracy, interspersed with historical accounts and journal entries from men who died and men who lived.

A privileged but well-meaning Southern belle named Violet Stiles discovers the shocking abuses at Andersonville. Aided by a possible suitor named Dance Pickett and a Rebel soldier named Emery Jones, who had to deliver his newfound Yankee friend to the prison, they form a society to bring the horrors to light. Their hometown of Americus, Georgia, is not far from Andersonville, but its residents wish to remain removed from the goings-on there, even when confronted with the sad reality. Groot ably captures the despair of prisoners and soldiers alike, as well as the divided emotions of the Southern townsfolk, who have lost sons to the cause and hate the Yankees but want to be “good Christians.” When told of the appalling cesspool that is Andersonville, many won’t believe, others believe but won’t act, and still more focus only on the technicalities and red tape involved. Groot truthfully renders the struggle between patriotism and Christ’s call to help the suffering regardless of their affiliation. (Book Page)

Customer Reviews

It was very well written and the characters were really developed.
AMAZON BUYER - Mark
I really enjoyed this book and would recommend it to anyone looking for a great historical fiction read.
J4Life5
The Sentinels of Andersonville is a historic fiction book set during the Civil War.
Tiffany

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By boxwood100 TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 17, 2014
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I honestly do not know what to say about this book. With such a huge subject as this, I was greatly wondering how Groot would handle it. Not that great, in my opinion. There are a few great points - I thought it particularly poignant that she took the time to highlight the gruesomeness of one of the Civil War prisons, but she got caught up in a storyline that really had jagged edges, jetting out all over the place. There wasn't anything to really pull you into the book - and with subjects like this, that is saying something. There was a lot left out, not a lot of character development, and I was left with an overall vagueness that I haven't felt after reading a book for quite some time. Like, why not visit a Confederate Prison, like the one she mentioned VERY briefly in Chicago?

For example, she tries to make Violet a heroine, but then everyone else jumps in there with her and she gets left out of the story quite a bit. Groot tosses in a marriage proposal and even that gets caught up in the wind. You have so many characters that you have to go back and see where they were mentioned previously to figure out who they are, some of which have no introduction at all. Just a last name and that's it.

Overall, just an average book - nothing here that's going to change the world at all. I would like to see her go back and redo this one. It feels like a book sketch of something that's going to be really good, like it isn't finished at all. There's more to be told and a better story to be written. This one lacks energy, focus and overall vision.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By mamaof4 on February 15, 2014
Format: Hardcover
"The Sentinels of Andersonville" by Tracy Groot, Book Review
Every country has parts of its history that it would like to erase, and the American Civil War should fall into that category. Brother against brother, families and farms ruined by the war and fighting of men. And the fall out of the war was the prisoners. This is the center of this novel, the Andersonville Prison, near the end of the war. The conditions were so bad that the stench could be smelled from a distance away. The South lacked the resources to care for these northern prisoners and so did little.

The novel is extremely detailed, and seems to move very slowly. I was a bit surprised by the Note to the Reader at the very beginning of the book describing that many of the details of the book include unimaginable sufferings, and not sure I even wanted to read any farther. But I did. And it was true. The details were, well, terrible, but showed what really happened.

I had a very difficult time getting into the book, figuring out the characters, following the plots, making since of the story. The details of the conditions were not so terrible that I could not read it, but I think slowed the progress of the story. Overall, this was not a favorite book, and I would only recommend it for those who really enjoy the details of the Civil War.

Disclaimer: I received this from Tyndale Publishers. All opinions expressed are my own.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Diesel on January 24, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
The facts, though inconvenient at times, can still be safe. Tens of thousands were imprisoned, thousands died unnecessary deaths while those responsible grew even more calloused. But Tracy Groot writes to the soul.

In this book it was Americus- a southern town where silverware must be placed just right- that stood a mere stone’s throw from the atrocities of Andersonville Prison. But a few individuals got it right, transcending the justified denial of hometown Americus to love where they could, save a few and bring light to a very dark place.

Great fiction reveals a truth that reality camouflages. Although we are daily surrounded by injustices of unfathomable measure and overwhelmed by a commensurate sense of helplessness, good writers call forth something. Risks worth taking.

True to form, Groot must have teleported herself back in time and spent a restless night, tossing and turning in the prison filth of Andersonville. And due to her signature style, I’m not allowed to sleep tonight. For “I am Americus.”
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J4Life5 on July 12, 2014
Format: Hardcover
Prior to reading this book, I was familiar with Andersonville only as being the name of a Confederate prison during the Civil War. One of my favorite things about reading historical fiction is that I learn a bit about history that I didn't know before. On rare occasions, a book is so well-researched and presents historical information in such an intriguing way that I feel compelled to read more books on the subject. That is what happened while reading The Sentinels of Andersonville.

I already knew I enjoyed Groot's writing style because I really enjoyed her book Flames of Resistance, but I do think this one is even better. Everything about this book was spot on - the description, the plot, and the characters. If I had anything negative to say, it would be that there were so many characters that sometimes I had to think for a couple of moments to remember the specifics of some of the minor characters, such as the townspeople.

This book is not only good from a historical perspective, but also because the message is so relevant. Sacrifice, loving your enemies, standing up for what is right, even if you are standing alone, mercy, and keeping your word despite the cost are just some of the ideas Groot explores through her characters. I especially like her comments in the afterword about asking ourselves not, "What would Jesus do?" but asking, "What can I do right now?". It really challenges readers to make a difference day by day in our communities and the people we come in contact with.

I really enjoyed this book and would recommend it to anyone looking for a great historical fiction read.
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More About the Author

Tracy Groot is the critically acclaimed and Christy Award-winning author of several works of historical fiction. Her books have received starred Booklist and Publishers Weekly reviews and have been called "beautifully written" and "page-turning" by Publishers Weekly, and "gripping" with "exquisitely drawn" characters by Library Journal.

Tracy and her husband have three sons and together own a coffee shop in Holland, Michigan.

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