Buy Used
$5.98
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by hippo_books
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Used may contain ex-library markings, notes or highlighting, may no longer have its dust jacket if applicable
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Service: The Memoirs of General Reinhard Gehlen Paperback – 1973


See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$40.00 $5.98
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$2.00
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
12%20Days%20of%20Deals%20in%20Books
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Popular Library; 2ND edition (1973)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B001F0NNZI
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.1 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,496,454 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Giuseppe Clemente on November 9, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
i was very surpriced, in a positive way, about this book and his author. gehlen was the head of the eastern branch of the german military intelligence. it brings a very good picture of the use of good intelligence in the planing of foreign politics and the eventual need to go to war. amazing is the fact that many warnings and analysis made by the author and his staff were disregarded by the nazi politicians. i'm still reading the book, but i could not wait to write already a positive note. this book is a must for a foreign service official, military intelligence and history student.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Roland M. Wagner on March 19, 2012
Format: Paperback
Gurman Singh Bal's comments about the memoirs of Gen. Gehlen are just ridiculous. Basically he can't get beyond his own subjective biases. The substance of his critique is that he feels Gehlen is arrogant, and he is amazed that Gehlen didn't dwell on the Holocaust. Concerning the arrogance charge, Singh Bal obviously has seen too many Hollywood movies and he can't see beyond his own stereotypes of strutting Nazis. Concerning the Holocaust charge, Gehlen wasn't involved in the Holocaust, he was not part of the bureaucracy that planned or implemented it, so why would any reasonable person expect him to dwell on it in his memoirs? Singh Bal may be surprised to hear that World War 2 was not solely about the Holocaust. The task of German intelligence on the Eastern front was to provide strategic information about the Soviets. Gehlen's memoirs provide a detailed inside look at the complex relationships between the former Nazi intelligence service and the CIA at the end of the war. It is well written, well translated by David Irving, and very insightful.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By J. B. ESQ on August 9, 2006
Format: Hardcover
General Gehlen's book, published in 1972, is a dire warning of the ongoing threat to freedom of communism. He discusses the Middle East crisis between Palestine and Israel as a problem that will persist for decades. (In light of current events, how right he was) The book also chronicles the subversive tactics of the communist/socialist/"progressive" movements throughout the world who claim to want peace but only seek the destruction of capitalism and the downfall of the West. An insightful thought provoking book more relevant now than it was 30 years ago.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on September 17, 2013
Format: Hardcover
'Normal' people do not construct elaborate identities, and while some pry into others' lives, they do not attempt to manipulate them, or blackmail, or implicate them in plots. But Gehlen's operatives would, in pursuit of information. At a time when vast armies faced each other across the European plains, they felt any detail might make a difference. To collect those observations, Gehlen tells how he would travel:
'I had done all I could to make my organization watertight and security-conscious. In Germany and abroad I traveled under different names, and in each of the three subsections in West Germany [when the Allies had split Germany after 1945] I was known by a different name: in the North it was Dr. Schneider; I had also had an American passport issued in the name of Garner and another identity card in the name of Gross. I felt it better to assume the dignity of "Doctor", since then I could be addressed anonymously as 'Herr Doktor'-- the less use that was made of any name the better. I knew the overall shape of the organization's structure, and from time to time I would be shown area charts of our operations on the other side of the Iron Curtain; but I took care not to learn too much about identities or the minutiae of the organization's undertakings. Probably nobody knows less of the operational incidents which fill the pages of modern spy books than the director of an intelligence agency....' (p. 172) If queried by his Chancellor, was he going to plead ignorance?
This sounds more like confessions of a serial philanderer visiting girlfriends on someone else's money. However, this was a memoir of a notorious official of the Third Reich, expert on the USSR.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Gurman Singh Bal on February 18, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Nazi era spymaster Reinhard Gehlen manipulated postwar U.S. occupation authorities into reviving his "Gehlen Organization" to continue its intelligence gathering and subversion campaigns against the Soviet Union. Gehlen boasts of the massive files and papers on the USSR that his organization compiled during WWII. Tellingly, Gehlen does not detail how such information was gathered. "Ve haff vays of making you talk", undoubtedly.

Gehlen's writing is arrogant and condescending; lavishly praising U.S. officers who happened to agree completely with him or who simply bowed to the 'superior wisdom' of Hitler's former Foreign Armies East chief.

Incredibly, Gehlen never discusses the Holocaust or other Nazi atrocities. Surely, as head of Foreign Armies East, Gehlen must have known of the Nazi genocide project. And as a citizen of Germany, he would have seen firsthand the escalating anti-semitic brutality of the Nazi beasts he served.

Pompously, Gehlen claims he and other German officers sought to convert Hitler's attack on Russia into a war of liberation. Gehlen then lists all the wonderful benefits of this benign German invasion; right of property, freedom of religion, choice of government. Gehlen claims he made this proposal in 1942, or after Hitler's Commissar Order and after the mass murder of Jews at Babi Yar.

I've read about half of Gehlen's garbage and may just dump the rest. The man's arrogant, pompous, deceitful personality reeks from the pages. The stench of the liar lives on.
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again