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The Seven Against Thebes Paperback – May 31, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 58 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (May 31, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1463501013
  • ISBN-13: 978-1463501013
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.1 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

Editorial Reviews

Review


"At last an edition with English commentary of this magnificent play."--The Classical World


--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Aeschylus (525 B.C.-456 B.C.) was a playwright of ancient Greece. Aeschylus was the earliest of the three greatest Greek tragedians, the others being Sophocles and Euripides. G. O. Hutchinson is at Exeter College, Oxford. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By B. A. L. on March 10, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This Clarendon paperbacks edition of Septem Contra Thebas (Seven Against Thebes) is a good edition of the Greek text, with a Critical Apparatus. It has a very good introduction, and the commentary on the text is detailed and helpful. Although this is not designed as a student text, it is suitable for an advanced student of Greek who wants to study Aeschylus in the original language.
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0 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on June 3, 2004
Format: Paperback
After the banishment of Oedipus, his twin sons Eteocles and Polyneices were elected co-kings of Thebes. They agreed to reign for alternate years, but Eteocles, would not relinquish the throne at the end of the first year, accusing his brother of having an evil disposition and banishing him from the city. Eventually Polyneices would return with six other champions to lay siege to the city. "The Seven Against Thebes" ("Septem Contra Thebas") expedition ends with both Eteocles and Polyneices dead, killed by each other, before the walls of Thebes. After that, the defenders crushed the besiegers and the seven proud generals were all killed, except for Adrastus, who managed to escape thanks to his divine horse, Arion. However, the defenders of Cadmeia, the acropolis of Thebes, had so many losses that from then on any victory which looked more like a defeat as called a Cadmeian victory.
The Aeschylus tragedy "Seven Against Thebes" is the only surviving play of a connected trilogy dealing with the sins of Laius (father of Oedipus) and the curse subsequently brought down upon his descendants. Aeschylus focuses on a prophecy that had been made regarding the sons of Oedipus: "They shall divide their inheritance with the sword in such a manner as to obtain equal shares." The play begins with Eteocles in command of the city and Polyneices arriving with his army of Argive soldiers. It begins with Eteocles making a call to arms and is followed by a description of the oath taken by the seven generals of the attacking armies. When the brothers kill each other during the battle by the walls of Thebes it becomes clear their "equal shares" refers to their common graves.
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