Qty:1
The Seventh Continent [VH... has been added to your Cart

Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$85.96
+ $3.99 shipping
Sold by: PARROT BOOKS
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • The Seventh Continent [VHS]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

The Seventh Continent [VHS]


Price: $89.95 & FREE Shipping. Details
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
2 new from $85.96
Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$66.98
$89.95 & FREE Shipping. Details Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Product Details

  • Actors: Birgit Doll, Dieter Berner, Leni Tanzer, Udo Samel
  • Directors: Michael Haneke
  • Format: Color, Full length, Import, Letterboxed, Subtitled, NTSC
  • Language: German, French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • VHS Release Date: October 15, 1995
  • Run Time: 111 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00002NDSW
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #538,715 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

What is the seventh continent? There are only six. Is it a desire for some better world, pushing through the cracks in this modern one, only to bear the most bitter of fruit? A presetn day Austrian family is being hallowed out by the numbing repeat of Urban life. George (Dieter Berner) is an engineer, his wife Anna, (Brigit Doll) an optician, both are blind to the deep emotional problems of Eva their daughter, THE SEVENTH CONTINENT chronicals three years in their lives. The film style is immaculate.

Review

"... the visual style is its state of mind...at first seems merely obsessive, then becomes truly mad." -- Vincent Canby The New York Times

"A powerful, provocative and highly disturbing Austrian film... a shocking and potent statement about out times...Devasting impact." -- Jonathan Rosenbaum, Chicago Reader

"The Seventh Continent is a calm chronical of hell...how commonplace people can erupt into despair and violence. Beautifully controlled, liberatingly intelligent... it establishes Haneke as one of the more remarkable young contempory filmmakers. The climatic half hour of this film ranks among the mosy truly terrifying in the modern cinema." -- Michael Wilmington, Chicago Tribune

Customer Reviews

I think that many people will be able to identify with this film.
PsyRC
Like I said, this is Haneke's most amateurish film, and so there are many segments that seem to become distracted by Haneke's own vision.
Andrew Ellington
It is a seemingly loving, attractive family, but there is no joy in their lives, only meaningless ritual.
Zarathustra

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 9, 2004
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
WARNING - POSSIBLY SPOILERS AHEAD
Excellent film. Extremely unorthodox. Be warned, this film doesn't really follow a standard narrative (it seems like most of what happens happens off-screen).
This is a film about a family that literally implodes, however there are no big verbal exchanges or explosions, no big speeches about "the meaning of it all". The director tells the story primarily with images and people placed in the frame as secondary characters to inanimate objects.
Essentially, a story about a family (mother, father, daughter) that are emotionally devastated by the 20th century and the environment of the technology age.
Someone else was correct in describing this film as similar to Todd Haynes "Safe". Both films are excellent, although Safe is more creepy-crawly ambiguous, The Seventh Continent is more devastating, darker - the kind of film that rattles your teeth days after when thinking about it.
there are scenes in this film that literally make you want to jump out of your skin: the sight of a pair of hands tearing up money and flushing it down the toilet (we never see the person's face). The scene goes on and on and you keep thinking "when is the director going to cut away from this???" but he keeps showing it. And then you realize there is something awesomely disturbing about what you are seeing: its so taboo in this day and age to see money being systematically, ritualistically destroyed. And to see it go on and on provokes a real response.
There are many moments like this.
That would be GREAT if this were released on DVD, along with the other two films in Haneke's "glaciation" trilogy: "Benny Video" and "71 Fragments of a Chronology of Chance". These are nearly impossible to find!!! PLease release them!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Zarathustra on June 28, 2010
Format: DVD
In French it would be La Nausee, in the USA it is The Blues. A young middle class Austrian family slowly falls apart before our eyes. It begins with their young daughter feigning blindness. The malaise slowly spreads to the mother and father. It is a seemingly loving, attractive family, but there is no joy in their lives, only meaningless ritual.
The title refers to Australia, where they plan to escape, but they never make it.
The Seventh Continent is Michael Haneke's first film, released in 1989, and based on a news story that he read. In this film he sets the pattern for many of his future films. He presents images, but does not try to explain the characters' motivation. Thus, he insists that the viewer find his own reasons for the characters' actions. There is no "right answer", since every viewer will be supplying his own motivations and in a sense creating his own film.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Ellington VINE VOICE on June 21, 2010
Format: DVD
To show that I am not completely bias and that I will not just hand continual five-star praise to Michael Haneke's work, I present to you my review of `Der Siebente Kontinent'. This isn't to say that I don't think this is a strong film, for it certainly is, but the flaws within this film are more readily noticeable.

This is Haneke's first feature film and thus his most amateur.

`Der Siebente Kontinent' is a film that, like all of Haneke's work, will haunt you. Using his cautious approach to weave a tale of eventual brutish barbarianism, Haneke creates a cold and isolated world that the audience feels almost instantly repulsed by. We are guarded as we sit down to soak in all that Haneke presents, and as we indulge our senses we see that there is much within this world to be afraid of. Being the first film in Haneke's `Glaciation Trilogy', `Der Siebente Kontinent' definitely creates an air of emotional apathy.

The film is a true account of a young suburban family who find that they have become emotionally void thanks to their thankless existence. They go through their routines with a sterile quality that leaves them rather unfulfilled. With nothing to differentiate them from anyone else (thus Haneke's decision to film them solely from the neck down for the first few minutes of the film), they have become another statistic; nothing more, nothing less. Watching this family go through their daily routine can become predictable and boring, but that is the entire intent of the film. Haneke films this in a way that brings the audience right into their home and into their life and gives them exactly what is needed to place them in the right mind frame.

If their lives were interesting then the ending wouldn't make much sense.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Chris Wilson on April 2, 2010
Format: DVD
What to make of Michael Haneke, the director whose unsettling films will disturb for weeks on end (Cache (Hidden), Time of the Wolf)? Born and raised in Germany (he most certainly is not American), since 1989 he's carved an extraordinary career as one of the most challenging artists of the modern era. His films make the work of Stanley Kubrick seem like a stroll through Pollyanna (Vault Disney Collection). But Kubrick, one of the great directors in history (Stanley Kubrick: Warner Home Video Directors Series (2001 A Space Odyssey / A Clockwork Orange / Eyes Wide Shut unrated / Full Metal Jacket / The Shining / A Life in Pictures)), is the filmmaker I am most reminded of when viewing Haneke (and to a lessor extent Ingmar Bergman - The Ingmar Bergman Trilogy: The Criterion Collection (Through a Glass Darkly / Winter Light / The Silence)). I'm sure there are other comparisons, Italian neorealists and French auteurs.

Haneke's debut was this stark and haunting 1989 work "The Seventh Continent." It has a film student quality (perhaps a way of saying it's not commercial?), but with an undeniable air of skill. The photography is superb, brightly lit with the striking colors of an assured visionary.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
The Seventh Continent [VHS]
This item: The Seventh Continent [VHS]
Price: $89.95
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com