The Shadow Dancer (A Wind River Reservation Myste) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

The Shadow Dancer Audio, Cassette – January 1, 2002


See all 14 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$45.00
Audio, Cassette, January 1, 2002
$10.15
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • ASIN: 158116565X
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,973,196 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Margaret Coel is the author of four nonfiction books and many articles on the people and places of the American West. Her work has won national and regional awards. Her first John O'Malley mystery, The Eagle Catcher, was a national bestseller, garnering excellent reviews from the Denver Post, Tony Hillerman, Jean Hager, Loren D. Estleman, Stephen White, Earlene Fowler, Ann Ripley and other top writers in the field. A native of Colorado, she resides in Boulder.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 11 customer reviews
Most are good, light reading with interesting twists and turns.
Sharon Galligar Chance
This was a pretty good mystery, involving Jesuit priest/detective John O'Malley and his Arapaho lawyer friend Vicki Holden.
M. C. Crammer
Margaret Coel has written an absorbing and interesting mystery that gives readers a glimpse into the modern day west.
Harriet Klausner

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Sharon Galligar Chance on August 29, 2002
Format: Hardcover
There are many mystery series out today that feature crime-solvers ranging from cooks to cats. Most are good, light reading with interesting twists and turns.
But if you are interested in a more serious and unique line of mysteries, look to Margaret Coel's Arapahoe series. Set on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, Coel's cast of characters include Jesuit priest Father John O'Malley and his friend Vicky Holden, who is an Arapahoe attorney from Denver. These two always manage to stumble upon unusual circumstances that need following up on, including murders, disappearances and mayhem.
Her latest book, "The Shadow Dancer," is the seventh in this group, and this time a charismatic leader of the Ghost Dancers is wreaking havoc on the reservation, with people near and dear to Father John and Vicky turning up missing and dead.
Dean Little Horse, a young Arapahoe with a talent for computers, is missing, and his elderly aunts have summoned Father John for help in finding him. During his inquiries about Dean, Father John discovers a man called Orlando has proclaimed himself the prophet of the Ghost Dancers, a religion promising a new world to come that swept the plains during the 1880's. Orlando is stirring up the residents of the reservation with his new group, known as the Shadow Dancers. Is this group responsible for Dean's disappearance?
Meanwhile, Vicky Holden is having troubles of her own. Her despised ex-husband has been murdered, and Vicky quickly becomes the prime suspect. She turns to Father John to help her find her husband's murderers, and it's during their search that they find evidence that the Shadow Dancers might have had a hand in this crime as well.
Coel is adept at weaving her stories with a flair for suspense that keeps her readers intrigued and enthralled.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Harriet Klausner #1 HALL OF FAME on September 8, 2002
Format: Hardcover
It has been four months since lawyer Vicky Holden left her high-powered job in a high profile legal firm to return home to the Wind River Reservation. She finally agrees to face her abusive ex-husband Ben at a local restaurant but they aren't together a few minutes before he loses his temper, makes a scene, and walks out.

A mortified Vicky departs from her public humiliation not long after the incident occurred only to later learn that Ben was murdered. The local FBI agent knows that Vicki had motive and opportunity, but no alibi. The gun is wiped clear of finger points except for a clear one that belongs to Vicki. Unless Vickie can find the real killer, she will be indicted for premeditated murder.

Margaret Coel has written an absorbing and interesting mystery that gives readers a glimpse into the modern day west. The protagonist is a feisty determined woman and her friend catholic priest Father O' Malley is her mirror image. Together this unlikely pair gets in and out of trouble so many times it feels as if they are stars in a Wild West epic.

Harriet Klausner
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By M. C. Crammer VINE VOICE on September 15, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Margaret Coel has a rich sense of place and describes the Arapaho/Shoshone reservation so well you can imagine you've been there many times -- and it is for this and her description of reservation life that I read her books so eagerly.
This was a pretty good mystery, involving Jesuit priest/detective John O'Malley and his Arapaho lawyer friend Vicki Holden. Vicki's ex-husband is found shot to death, and since they had just had a very public fight in a restaurant (and they are well known to have had a very difficult marriage), she is the obvious suspect. Even her own children suspect her. She must find the real killer or killers to avoid getting charged (and probably convicted) of this murder. Her only lead is a fight her ex told her about at dinner -- with two Lakota Indians who had been working for him. She must find them and discover what the fight was about, since they are obvious suspects. She believes they are hiding out at a ranch that holds an apocalyptic cult, but the cult is very secretive and locating these two men proves difficult and dangerous. John O'Malley gets involved, trying to keep Vicki from harm. He is also looking for someone -- an Arapaho man who has disappeared. Of course there is a connection between the death of ex-husband Ben Holden and the disappearance of this other man, but that connection is only uncovered late in the story.
My only complaint -- and I think Coel is figuring out this can't continue -- is the pointlessness of Vicki and John pining quietly for each other, knowing that nothing but a friendship can result. The "romance" between the two is an annoyance. I keep wanting to tell VIcki to find someone who is actually available (unlike this priest). This book suggests that Coel may be moving in that direction.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Karen Potts on January 5, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is one of the best books in an excellent series. Margaret Coel spins a multi-layered plot which begins when Arapaho attorney Vicky Holden returns to her home at the Wind River Reservation after going to Denver to try to sort out her relationship with the reservation's priest, Father John. Her ex-husband, Ben, talks her into meeting him for lunch but their conversation ends in a bitter argument. When Ben is found dead, Vicky becomes a major suspect. Meanwhile Father John is dealing with the disappearance of a young Indian named Dean Little Horse and an Indian cult whose shadow dancers are twisting some of the early Arapaho religious practices. Added to this, Vicky is working on water rights for the Indians and Father John is battling his superiors who want to close the mission where he is the priest. Mix these elements together and you have an enjoyable reading experience with well-drawn characters and the beautiful Wyoming reservation as a background.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa2ae4270)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?