The Shape of Things to Come (Businessweek Books) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$4.00
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Shape of Things to Come: 7 Imperatives for Winning in the New World of Business Hardcover – August 24, 1998


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$2.28 $0.01
Paperback
"Please retry"
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$12.00

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Series: Businessweek Books
  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Mcgraw-Hill; 1ST edition (August 24, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0070482632
  • ISBN-13: 978-0070482630
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,565,696 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The twin waves of globalization and information technology present business opportunities that Oliver, a professor at the Owen Graduate School of Management at Vanderbilt University, maps with mixed success. A former Northern Telecom executive, Oliver decrees intriguingly that the information age is over, and we are at the dawning of what he calls the "Bio-Materials Age," where manipulating organic matter?be it agriculture output or environmental pollutants?will be where the next commercial battles are fought. To get from here to there, Oliver offers his seven imperatives, presented in the middle third of the book. The problem is that some of them?"think global/act global," "replace rules with roles"?will strike many managers as old news. And where Oliver raises engaging ideas, e.g., "make customers your marketing department," "personalize everything," his examples from companies such as Honda and Wells Fargo are fuzzy at best. Perhaps his greatest contribution here is forcing readers to anticipate how the next waves of change will transform the way they do business in the "post-information society."
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

Oliver is a management professor specializing in corporate strategy, global marketing, and new business creation at Vanderbilt University's Owen Graduate School of Management. Like many other authorities, he cites rapid globalization and technological change as causes for the "chaos" we face in "the new world of business." Also like many others, he refers to this "new world" as a "global village." What is original about Oliver's scenario is his contention that we are at the end of the information age. He compares information to energy; both are essential but neither is any longer "the engine that drives and shapes the . . . economy." Instead, we are about to enter the "age of bio-materials." Oliver predicts how organizations, products, markets, and strategies will change in a new era shaped by biotechnology and the new materials that it will create. David Rouse

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By JMF (a father) on November 26, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Easy read, good overview of shifting global environment.
very interesting 'Post-Information Society' theory.
First 100 pages tidy but overly simplistic recap of what we all know (Part I and II). Part III very good reading, thought provoking, unique and vision altering concepts introduced (especially chapter 8 - The Post-Information Society).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By A Customer on November 7, 1998
Format: Hardcover
I put this book in my briefcase for reading on a recent overseas flight. I found it to be very interesting, especially where Professor Oliver describes how successful companies must operate in the 21st century. I am a strong advocate of quality customer service. I like his concept that huge national markets may disappear and be replaced by billions of individual customers whose needs must be fulfilled for a company to be successful. John R. Jagoe, Director, Export Institute.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
The title of this book refers to the last 100 or so pages-- for the first hundred pages, the author describes his approach to describing technology and marketing up to the present. Then he gets into his "seven"-- seven strategic imperatives, seven 21st century companies, seven 21st century products and technologies. The text provides brief, big-picture coverage of how marketing and change management converge. Could be a big help to marketing-oriented global strategists,since the author has rich corporate and academic experience in his vita.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rolf Dobelli HALL OF FAME on June 1, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Author Richard W. Oliver argues that speed and customer responsiveness are keys to the new world of business. To stay alive, companies must flatten their corporate structures, do away with old roles, and embrace the technology that allows data mining and Internet-based purchasing. The author predicts that in the new century companies will sell directly to consumers, job descriptions will become more fluid, and smart cards and knowbots will become ubiquitous devices. This compelling, thoughtful book examines the trends shaping the global economy. While the book isn't always organized clearly, it illustrates its points through examples of real companies which have changed their practices. We [...] recommend this book to any owners, executives, and managers who are involved in planning long-term strategies.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Laurence J. Stybel on December 21, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Richard Oliver held executive positions at Nortel and DuPont.
He is currently a professor of marketing at the Owen Graduate School of Management at Vanderbilt University and sits on the boards of six U.S. companies.
Daniel Bell's THE POST INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY heralded the end of the industrial era and outlined the structure of the information age. THE SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME heralds the end of the information age and outlines the structure of what Oliver calls the Bio-Materials Age.
Can it really be that the information age is just about to end? Oliver makes a convincing argument that it is already over.
The author structures the outlines of what needs to be done in the Bio-Materials Age and provides concrete examples of companies currently doing it: Southwestern Airlines, Oticon, W. I Gore & Associates, Chaparral Steel, Granite Rock Company, Bank of Montreal, and the U.S. Military. We love the range of the companies he selected!
As we on Boards of Directors help steer our companies out of the industrial era into the information age, it is vital to keep in mind that the information age itself will be a relatively short transition. "Keep Your Eyes on the Ball" is necessary but insufficient. We need to make sure that management is keeping its eyes on the direction of the ball.
You don't have to agree with every detail in his book. But you will probably acknowledge that the general direction of Richard Oliver's argument is both logical and unavoidable.
MARYANNE PEABODY & LAURENCE J. STYBEL are co-founders of Boston-based STYBEL PEABODY ASSOCIATES.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search