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The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald Hardcover – Deluxe Edition, April 15, 1998


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The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald + Tender Is the Night + The Great Gatsby (Scribner Classics)
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 800 pages
  • Publisher: Scribner; Classic Edition edition (April 15, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684842505
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684842509
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 1.7 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #203,476 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Bruccoli's ( Some Sort of Epic Grandeur ) collection of 43 Fitzgerald stories includes 23 not featured in Malcolm Cowley's landmark 1951 collection, expanding the canon of a peerless American writer who was deeply ambivalent about the role of short fiction in his art. Published in commercial magazines (e.g., the Saturday Evening Post ), the stories brought their author as much as $4000 each--but also exacted a price, distracting Fitzgerald from work on his novels. Regardless, many of the stories are unequalled in achievement--inspirited with a delicate wit, a shrewd perception of character and a poetic sense of place--and lead us through Fitzgerald's rich creative chronology, from unforgettable evocations of the enchanting but ruthless social whirl of the young in the 1920s ("Bernice Bobs Her Hair") to the exhaustion of spirit chronicled 16 years later in "Afternoon of an Author." Among the 23 stories, nearly all of which have appeared previously in magazines, is one--"Last Kiss"--published for the first time in the author's final revision. Invaluable to Fitzgerald admirers, Bruccoli's collection should also capture a new generation of readers. BOMC alternate, QPB main selection .
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

This collection of 43 stories--culled from some 160 in the Fitzgerald canon--is designed to replace Malcolm Cowley's 1951 selection of 28 stories. Bruccoli has prefaced each story briefly and reasserted his conviction that Fitzgerald is of paramount importance as a short-story writer. Those already thus persuaded may welcome this new edition. Others, less enchanted by such claims, will not. So much of Fitzgerald seems hopelessly dated, so much O. Henry-ized, so much twisted into easy magazine-acceptability that the occasionally brilliant sentence that Fitzgerald could always unexpectedly produce serves more as a gauge of the normal mediocrity of his imagination than the mark of any enduring value.
- Earl Rovit, City Coll., CUNY
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

F. Scott Fitzgerald was one of the major American writers of the twentieth century -- a figure whose life and works embodied powerful myths about our national dreams and aspirations. Fitzgerald was talented and perceptive, gifted with a lyrical style and a pitch-perfect ear for language. He lived his life as a romantic, equally capable of great dedication to his craft and reckless squandering of his artistic capital. He left us one sure masterpiece, The Great Gatsby; a near-masterpiece, Tender Is the Night; and a gathering of stories and essays that together capture the essence of the American experience. His writings are insightful and stylistically brilliant; today he is admired both as a social chronicler and a remarkably gifted artist.

Customer Reviews

If you've never read anything by Fitzgerald, I would suggest starting with "The Great Gatsby."
foundpoem
Prepare yourself for a slow read--because you'll want to reread each phrase, each sentence, each paragraph, and each story....over and over again.
Edward Dunn
I also love the short introductions provided before each story, as they give the reader a sense of context to the story.
ladymiley

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Edward Dunn on August 5, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book is the wellspring of Fitzgerald's literary genius. The first treat is Brucolli's informed selection of Scott's some 165 works and his brief, beautiful preface...followed by 43 perfectly crafted gems from the master: Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald. I read a clutch of Fitzgerald novels in my late teens. More than 20 years later, I started on this impeccable volume, which unfurled an additional world of wonders. Brucolli has gathered the best of Fitzgerald's short stories--in other words, the best of 20th century American short fiction--and provided brief, illuminating introductory passages for each journey into Scott's glorious prose. Some stories are realistic, while others are full of phantasm. Some are cruel and unnerving, while others are sweet and whimsical. But all of them are informed by Scott's style: poetic, melancholy, vibrant, forlorn, youthful, aged, dated, and eternally modern. I literally fell in love with Fitzgerald over the course of this book. He may have been an alcoholic spendthrift in life. But, in the undying world of words, he was a man of almost painfully honed sensibilities. Prepare yourself for a slow read--because you'll want to reread each phrase, each sentence, each paragraph, and each story....over and over again. This century has produced a pantheon of titanic American masters of short fiction: Hemingway, Faulkner, Welty, O'Connor, Cheever, Porter, Jewett, Stegner. Yet, when the sun sets, Scott Fitzgerald, gone too soon at 44, towers above all. Buy it! You'll savor it for a lifetime.
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89 of 103 people found the following review helpful By William on May 17, 2001
Format: Hardcover
As a devoted admirer of the form, I can tell you that this book has more gems in it, POUND FOR POUND that virtually any other book of it's type.
Do you enjoy the poetry of Keats and the other Romantic poets? Do you enjoy Shakespeare's sonnets? Then you'll LOVE this book. It BREATHES, it shivvers with vitality and lyricism. I've read the entire book twice, and individual stories like "Rich Boy", "Babylon Revisited", "Absolution"; which many consider as a trial for the "Great Gatsby", "Jacob's Ladder", "Winter Dreams", etc., too many times to recount. THERE IS BEAUTY AND POETRY IN THE WRITING! Does the plot always nail us to our chairs? No, not even in Gatsby; but the writing does. That is why I agree with Gertrude Stein's assesment of Fitzgerald vis-a-vis Hemingway: That his flame burns a little brighter. She was so enraptured by "Gatsby", that she drew a line on her wall, with the request to "please, next time, write one THIS thick".
Are they all great? Well, to a degree, greatness is in the eye of the beholder. SOME individual stories which are raved over by critics and readers alike leave me relatively cold. "Benjamin Button"; the case of a person born elderly and "aging" in reverse, to me reads like bad science fiction. "Diamond as Big as the Ritz", is interesting only in several short sections in which Fitzgerald is trying to describe the most opulent scene which his fertile imagination can create. The rest of if to me is more farce than satire; and what precious little satire is available, seems a bit threadbare.
BUT IF YOU HAVE A SENSITIVITY FOR PURE POETRY, you can not help but be moved by this book.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By William on August 1, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Don't be misled by another reviewer who claimed that this book "leaves out his (Scott's) hits", as if that were a way to speak about pages written in blood. It doesn't leave them out anyway.
"May Day", with its tremendous symbolism and exploration of early socialism in this country. The insites into the North/South dichotomy reflected in his marriage to Zelda, and expounded upon in Ice Palace. The incredibly beautiful story "Winter Dreams" will strike a resonant chord with anyone who has every realized the gossamer nature of their most cherrished love illusions--I could go on about virtually every story in the Book--and for at least a little while I shall.
Not a big fan of "Diamond Big as the Ritz", or "Benjamin Button", but they are interesting as exercises in literature for anyone drawn to fantasy.
However when Fitgerald is dealing in a lyrical way with he topics which made Gatsby the Greatest Book of the century; as he does frequently, he is not to be surpassed.
Jacobs ladder, with the poignant story of a slightly (ahem) older man's fondness for a young girl which turns into a devastating love unrequitted for the adult. The novella/story Rich Boy, which I must say in agreement with Ring Lardner, contains if not the actual material, certainly the germ of many another authors novel's worth of writing. "Babylon Revisted" is one of the greatest short stories of this or any other author in this or any other time.
And then of course the wonderfully humorous and whimsical stories like "Dice, Brass, Knuckles, and Guitar", and "Jelly Bean"--yet still with that charactersitically Fitgeraldian sympathy for his characters.
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