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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The essence of literary genius distilled in one volume.
This book is the wellspring of Fitzgerald's literary genius. The first treat is Brucolli's informed selection of Scott's some 165 works and his brief, beautiful preface...followed by 43 perfectly crafted gems from the master: Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald. I read a clutch of Fitzgerald novels in my late teens. More than 20 years later, I started on this impeccable...
Published on August 5, 1999 by Edward Dunn

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8 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Deadline Looming....
It was, after all, the Great Cham, Samuel Johnson, who said that "Nobody but a blockhead ever wrote for anything but money"-I don't believe this is true. I don't even believe Johnson that "harmless drudge" as he describes himself in the dictionary he spent several unrewarded years compiling believed it either. But it does, anent Fitzgerald and his stories, as comprised...
Published on July 23, 2006 by Daniel Myers


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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The essence of literary genius distilled in one volume., August 5, 1999
This book is the wellspring of Fitzgerald's literary genius. The first treat is Brucolli's informed selection of Scott's some 165 works and his brief, beautiful preface...followed by 43 perfectly crafted gems from the master: Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald. I read a clutch of Fitzgerald novels in my late teens. More than 20 years later, I started on this impeccable volume, which unfurled an additional world of wonders. Brucolli has gathered the best of Fitzgerald's short stories--in other words, the best of 20th century American short fiction--and provided brief, illuminating introductory passages for each journey into Scott's glorious prose. Some stories are realistic, while others are full of phantasm. Some are cruel and unnerving, while others are sweet and whimsical. But all of them are informed by Scott's style: poetic, melancholy, vibrant, forlorn, youthful, aged, dated, and eternally modern. I literally fell in love with Fitzgerald over the course of this book. He may have been an alcoholic spendthrift in life. But, in the undying world of words, he was a man of almost painfully honed sensibilities. Prepare yourself for a slow read--because you'll want to reread each phrase, each sentence, each paragraph, and each story....over and over again. This century has produced a pantheon of titanic American masters of short fiction: Hemingway, Faulkner, Welty, O'Connor, Cheever, Porter, Jewett, Stegner. Yet, when the sun sets, Scott Fitzgerald, gone too soon at 44, towers above all. Buy it! You'll savor it for a lifetime.
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89 of 103 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't believe the old canards about Fitzgerald's Short Story, May 17, 2001
By 
William (Baltimore, Maryland) - See all my reviews
As a devoted admirer of the form, I can tell you that this book has more gems in it, POUND FOR POUND that virtually any other book of it's type.
Do you enjoy the poetry of Keats and the other Romantic poets? Do you enjoy Shakespeare's sonnets? Then you'll LOVE this book. It BREATHES, it shivvers with vitality and lyricism. I've read the entire book twice, and individual stories like "Rich Boy", "Babylon Revisited", "Absolution"; which many consider as a trial for the "Great Gatsby", "Jacob's Ladder", "Winter Dreams", etc., too many times to recount. THERE IS BEAUTY AND POETRY IN THE WRITING! Does the plot always nail us to our chairs? No, not even in Gatsby; but the writing does. That is why I agree with Gertrude Stein's assesment of Fitzgerald vis-a-vis Hemingway: That his flame burns a little brighter. She was so enraptured by "Gatsby", that she drew a line on her wall, with the request to "please, next time, write one THIS thick".
Are they all great? Well, to a degree, greatness is in the eye of the beholder. SOME individual stories which are raved over by critics and readers alike leave me relatively cold. "Benjamin Button"; the case of a person born elderly and "aging" in reverse, to me reads like bad science fiction. "Diamond as Big as the Ritz", is interesting only in several short sections in which Fitzgerald is trying to describe the most opulent scene which his fertile imagination can create. The rest of if to me is more farce than satire; and what precious little satire is available, seems a bit threadbare.
BUT IF YOU HAVE A SENSITIVITY FOR PURE POETRY, you can not help but be moved by this book. Look at it this way, Hemingway wrote "Moveable Feast", BECAUSE HE WAS INTIMIDATED BY FITZGERALD. Did Fitzgerald drink too much? Sure he did, but so did Joyce, Faulkner, Lardner, and Hemingway himself. It's nothing but lamentable, but we can't start disregarding writers because of their personal habits, or we're all going to be reading O Henry and James Whitcomb Riley.
Did Fitzgerald flunk out of college? Yes, that is true also, but Hemingway didn't even GO TO COLLEGE, and has a memorable quote in a short story that "education is an opiate of the people". Edmund Wilson was a fantastic scholar--and a boring writer. Don't judge the EXTRANEOUS, judge the writing itself. Don't confuse brilliance with being an academic. Einstein himself was a "C" student.
Too much is made about Fitzgerald's own negative assessment regarding his short stories. Scott could never handle pressure. He attributed this facility for "wavering at the critical moment" as a bequeathal from his father. It may have made him feel better to belittle the work he did everyday to earn his bread--so at least he could not be held to his own impossibly high standards for something so mercenary, or so goes the logic. But he was craving desperatly for money during much of his life, so doesn't logic also imply that if he could earn more money for ONE story than the years of labor that went into "Tender is the Night" , that he would put forth something VERY CLOSE TO HIS BEST? When he was flat broke and his daughter and wife needing support and if his story wasn't accepted by a major magazine of the time, they would suffer terrible consequences? I can guarantee you that he tried and very hard. The proof as they say is in the pudding.
This book deserves a PROMINENT PLACE in any library where the premium is paid to writing for its own beauty and elegance. You too will wish this book of short stories was a little "thicker" by the time you finish it.
For God's sake, you should by this book if for no other reason than to honor the man's life. The fact that it IS so good, is more of a break than we typically get in life.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gatsby-like jewels scattered throughout, August 1, 2000
By 
William (Baltimore, Maryland) - See all my reviews
Don't be misled by another reviewer who claimed that this book "leaves out his (Scott's) hits", as if that were a way to speak about pages written in blood. It doesn't leave them out anyway.
"May Day", with its tremendous symbolism and exploration of early socialism in this country. The insites into the North/South dichotomy reflected in his marriage to Zelda, and expounded upon in Ice Palace. The incredibly beautiful story "Winter Dreams" will strike a resonant chord with anyone who has every realized the gossamer nature of their most cherrished love illusions--I could go on about virtually every story in the Book--and for at least a little while I shall.
Not a big fan of "Diamond Big as the Ritz", or "Benjamin Button", but they are interesting as exercises in literature for anyone drawn to fantasy.
However when Fitgerald is dealing in a lyrical way with he topics which made Gatsby the Greatest Book of the century; as he does frequently, he is not to be surpassed.
Jacobs ladder, with the poignant story of a slightly (ahem) older man's fondness for a young girl which turns into a devastating love unrequitted for the adult. The novella/story Rich Boy, which I must say in agreement with Ring Lardner, contains if not the actual material, certainly the germ of many another authors novel's worth of writing. "Babylon Revisted" is one of the greatest short stories of this or any other author in this or any other time.
And then of course the wonderfully humorous and whimsical stories like "Dice, Brass, Knuckles, and Guitar", and "Jelly Bean"--yet still with that charactersitically Fitgeraldian sympathy for his characters.
The Basil Duke Lee stories are the best of that genre ever written. Period.
OK, I'm breathing easier after seing that last ridiculously tepid review.
If this book were priced by lyricism, insight, and general beauty of the prose, it should go for well over $1,000's in relation to other books of its kind.
An insult to Fitzgerald that it is sold this CHEAPLY.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Edition of the Fitzgerald Stories, October 16, 2008
This edition remains the best and most authoritatve edition of the Scott Fitzgerald stories. Bruccoli is a great Fitzgerald scholar and editor, and knows exactly what he is about. Elsewhere (a separate collection) he has collected all the 2nd tier stories of this author made for the popular Saturday Evening Post. Here however are the gems, the downright masterpieces, engaging as the day on which they were written and chosen for their excellence.

Hemingway accurately stated that Scott's talent was delicate as a butterfly's wings, but failed to understand how much of his product would stand up to time. Scott is much stronger than he looks at first glance. I prefer not to think of butterfly wings but those elegantly sleek, sculpted hood ornaments of mid century 20 -- solid polished steel.

That said, a warning is in order that Scott is somewhat of an acquired taste. His Jazz age infatuations can irritate; they already did in his own lifetime. Sometimes, especially in early stories, there is a page of utter faceitiousness, Scott merely showing off and being oh so cute. He is worth putting up with through these insults to the reader, and will benefit the reader's patient plodding on. There is always shrewd insight about human character and that dirty word in our allegedly open society -- class. Yes, Scott in his life and in some of his writings gave in to toadiness to "the rich." But not in the time-certified beauties collected here -- including Babylon Revisited, May Day, The Diamond as Big as the Ritz (fairy tale), and the terse masterpiece The Lost Decade, among many others. Scott was a great listener and keen observer, and here delivers the essence of his wild era like a fresh bouquet across decades, special delivery.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful writing, July 13, 2003
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This review is from: The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald: A New Collection (Paperback)
The use of language doesn't get much better than this. Each sentence is a work of art and a pleasure to read. I smile as I read. The stories themselves are so clearly placed in a post-WWI setting that they are a glimpse into life in the 1920's - as, I believe, Fitgerald wanted to show. Also, to me, any Fitgerald work edited or or explained by Matthew Bruccoli is informative & interesting.

The above, though, is to those who like Fitzgerald. To me, his is special beyond many other authors' writing. If you've never enjoyed his work before, this book won't change that. If you've never read anything by Fitzgerald, I would suggest starting with "The Great Gatsby."
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fitzgerald's Stories--Short and Sweet, September 27, 2002
This review is from: The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald: A New Collection (Paperback)
F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote tons of stories during his lifetime--something around 134, total. This book, however, contains the most elite chunk of those writings. To start, "Bernice Bobs Her Hair" is one of Fitzgerald's most-read stories. I have read it myself, but have found better ones. "The Ice Palace", for instance, has a remarkable ability to make its readers walk away saying "I relate to this!". "May Day", my personal favorite, is about people on top sinking to the bottom, and people on the bottom sinking lower. At least, that's the abridged summary, there's alot more to it then that. "Winter Dreams" is another winner, but I liked "May Day" better. All of his stories generally pertain to Fitzgerald's masterpiece, "The Great Gatsby". In other words, they all contain that one character desperately searching for the missing piece of the puzzle. That can be either the one element that would make his/her life complete, or launch it in a different direction. Why does he do this so well? Because this theme is partially autobiographical. Fitzgerald started off at Princeton where he made hardly any friends. Then he moved on to the Southern US when he joined the army. This is where he met Zelda. But Zelda did not want to marry him due to his lack of money. So Fitzgerald began writing in persuit of the dollar to support Zelda. His plan worked and he was a big success...for a while. Then he moved, in despiration, to Europe in order to gain a better status. This didn't work either and he ended up dying in Hollywood at age 40. His wife, Zelda, went mad and was institutionalized a few years prior. This should be kept in mind as you read his short stories, there are definate parallels!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful, quick read, December 4, 2001
By A Customer
I've read almost all of F Scott Fitzgerald's work and I was delighted to find this compelation of short stories. I read this book alomst four years ago and I can still remember the characters and details of each story - my favorite was Diamond as Big as the Ritz. Try it out and you will not be dissapointed!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON AND MORE, December 28, 2008
I picked up this book at my local library to read, since I wanted to read the story, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button before seeing the movie starring Brad Pitt. The story is great and worth reading. It is only 20+ pages, but really interesting. I saw the movie yesterday, and highly recommend the movie. The movie has taken some liberties from the book, but still excellent. Movies are always different from the book. The short story book is full of other great stories written by F. Scott Fitzgerald that I enjoyed reading too. I also recommend you read the story The Diamond as Big as the Ritz.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars F Scott Fitzawesome, January 7, 2007
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This review is from: The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald: A New Collection (Paperback)
F Scott Fitzgerald is the greatest American author of the 20th Century. It's easy to see why with this collection of short stories. What I enjoy best about this book is seeing the experimentation of Fitzgerald's writing from one story to the next. It's fun to see the literary and thematic chances that he took as his career progressed. You should buy this book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald, October 1, 2012
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This is a refreshing look into the pleasure of reading well crafted short stories. The characters are presented with intimate glimpses into their perceptions of the people and world around them with unexpected twist endings that keep you mentally engaged.
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The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald: A New Collection
The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald: A New Collection by F. Scott Fitzgerald (Paperback - September 20, 1995)
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