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The Shortest Distance Between Two Women Paperback – August 18, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 339 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam; Original edition (August 18, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 055380541X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553805413
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.5 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #309,384 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The Gilford family's yearly reunion encompasses the lives of matriarch Marty Gilford and her four daughters, especially youngest daughter, Emma, 43, who has spent a good part of her life doing whatever her mother and sisters want without really thinking of herself. Then Samuel, a voice from her past, calls up to rekindle their romance and throws Emma's well-ordered life into turmoil. Emma is forced to do some tough self-examination and to embrace her sisters for who they are—good and bad. Radish displays an intimate understanding of boisterous families, and as a veteran at portraying female relationships, her affection for her characters shines through, but she's covering a lot of familial ground here, and it's easy to confuse the characters. Also, the complaining, put-upon Emma is not totally sympathetic. While those familiar with Southern families will delight in a taste of home and there are many funny parts, overall, Radish's latest falls short. (Aug.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

“Women will surely connect with Radish’s empowered femmes.” —Publishers Weekly

“Radish delivers her message of sisterhood for all women while encouraging men to find their common bond with women and themselves.” —Booklist

More About the Author

Kris Radish grew up dreaming about living a Nancy Drew-like life and always held her own passion for writing very close to her heart. A former journalist, nationally syndicated columnist, magazine writer and university instructor, Radish also loves to tell stories about the times she picked nighcrawlers, served beer to cowboys, worked on a tomato farm and hung out of the side of a fast moving helicoper.

Radish is now the bestselling author of eight novels and has captured the hearts of legions of fans with her heartwarming, real, passionate and often hilarious novels. Her stories focus on the important bonds of female friendship and celebrate the common feelings, heartaches, loves, and struggles that all women share. She loves to call her work "true fiction" because she addresses the real emotions that women live and share every day.

She is also the author of two non-fiction books, writes poetry, is the mother of two young and very feisty adults, is known for her wild laugh and wilder hair, and is working on her ninth and tenth novels. Radish is also co-owner of The Wine Madonna - a wine lounge in downtown St. Petersburg, Florida where she hosts book groups from around the country

Customer Reviews

Radish always has such wonderful insights and dialogue.
Spacey Tracey
The other characters have issues that seem more to be a response to the frequent criticism of Radish's characters for being unrealistic than actual character traits.
Booksherpa
I rarely put a book down without finishing it, but I just skimmed the last third.
Mom in Michigan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Booksherpa on October 6, 2009
Format: Paperback
I just finished this book, and was quite disappointed in it. I've enjoyed all of Kris Radish's other books to varying degrees, with Sunday List of Dreams as my favorite. This book was the worst she's written. It was full of all the things I dislike about Kris Radish's books - an overabundance of long and colorful metaphors, one dimensional characters, men who do nothing but serve as punching bags and background material, and a woman who seemingly changes from wallflower to warrior overnight. Worst of all, the ending was utterly lame - the situation set up in the first page comes to a whimper of a resolution, leaving me totally unsatisfied and saying "That's it?!". There was little of the wit that was clearly evident in her previous books. The strong female friendships that form the core of all her books are shallow and forced here. The only characters that seem to be classic Radish are Susie Dell, Marty Gilford, and Emma's niece, Stephie, but none of these are the 4 sisters that supposedly form the main relationships of the book. The other characters have issues that seem more to be a response to the frequent criticism of Radish's characters for being unrealistic than actual character traits. Her treatment of alcoholism and infidelity in the storyline seems flat and forced.

Previous to this release, I would have named her last book as her weakest. This is not a good trend. I would get this book, and the next Radish book at your local library rather than spending money for them.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Sam I Am on September 2, 2009
Format: Paperback
just read the last 3 chapters. ubelievable. i mean simply unbelievable. i don't mind a little embellishment, but please. this is a young adult story at best, and should be bannished for creating a bit too much hope for future young women.

and as far as the men in the book are concerned, they are cardboard characters. as men should read books with female characters of depth, women should read books that provide at least "some" insight into the male psyche.

avoid this and stories like it. read the last 3 chapters. nothing but kumbaya. it cheapens the emotional depth of women for that matter. i read the last chapter to my girlfriend, we laughed or maybe gagged at the level of syrup the reader is expected to swallow.

PASS on this!!!!!!!!!!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Katie K. on September 16, 2009
Format: Paperback
Love, love, love. The Beatles sum up this book quite well. Love, love, love. All you need is love. Though so much love can be a bit over-emotional at times. And possibly unrealistic. I don't think I've ever called either of my sisters "Sister" or "Love" or "Sweetie". They'd laugh at me. This book was over-flowing with sap and mush. I will admit that it did bring me to tears a couple of times, and I did love the story itself, the concept of women coming together through craziness and some adversity, but wow. Wading through the swamp of sappy mush as a bit tiring at times.

The other thing about the author's style that bothered me was the jumping back and forth from present to past. She'd start out a chapter in the present tense, and then revert back to a scene that happened that morning or the night before or last week or even 10 years ago. It became confusing. Am I reading about today? About yesterday? When exactly did this happen?

Ok so I realize this sounds like I didn't like the book. Not true. It kept me entertained with every turn of the page and I was invested in the life of Emma and cheered along with everyone at Stephie's pageant and would have loved to have shared a glass of wine with the women in the gazebo. It was a great journey through female emotions and finding happiness. Actually, choosing happiness. This is a book that I do recommend, but just understand that it sometimes gets nauseatingly sentimental.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mom in Michigan on August 22, 2013
Format: Paperback
This was the first book I'd read by this author and it will be the last. The situation with the former boyfriend that seems to start many of the main character's changes is never resolved at all, in fact we don't even get to meet the guy. Hard to believe that the woman is 43 years old and just starting to examine her life, what was she doing all of those years? Few of the relationships in the story rang true to me. The writing was really hard to get through as well. I rarely put a book down without finishing it, but I just skimmed the last third. Don't waste your time on this one!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Patricia on July 16, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I usually love Kris Radish books. This was absolutely painful to read. My sons kept asking why I didn't give up when I was determined to finish the book. I finally completed my reading and I have to say I should have listened to my boys.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By P. Montgomery on March 18, 2010
Format: Paperback
This is the first Kris Radish book I have read and I loved it. One reviewer said it was a young adult book but the main character is 44 and all of her sisters are older. This book spoke to me and my life and I loved how she put things in perspective. I also loved how much I laughed. Could not put it down! This is a funny woman in a serious way with serious life events and changes. I have just begun a second book of hers and compared to this one it seems a little slow but is picking up. It is one that has a lot higher rating than this one so I am sure it will be grand. Maybe the trick is to read them backwards from the print date? I plan to read them all!!!
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