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The Siege of Leningrad: 900 Days of Terror (Cassell Military Paperbacks) Paperback – April 1, 2007


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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Seal off Leningrad, then weaken it by terror and starvation" Adolf Hitler" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

David M Glantz is a former US Army intelligence specialist with a unique knowledge of the Russian army and Russian military history. His WHEN TITANS CLASHED is the standard single volume account of the war in Russia.
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Product Details

  • Series: Cassell Military Paperbacks
  • Paperback: 334 pages
  • Publisher: Cassell (April 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0304366722
  • ISBN-13: 978-0304366729
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,464,719 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

David M Glantz is a former US Army intelligence specialist with a unique knowledge of the Russian army and Russian military history. His WHEN TITANS CLASHED is the standard single volume account of the war in Russia.

Customer Reviews

For anyone wanting to know what really happened at Leningrad in World War II, this book is a must.
Steve
This book is unlike Glantz's books on Kursk, Kharkov, or Mars in that it is a slim, larger-sized hardback with a lot of photos and color maps.
Anthony Cooper
The book is also full of statistic data and it has plenty of photographs, many of which are very good.
Dimitrios

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By T. Kunikov VINE VOICE on July 2, 2001
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A great general account of WWII around Leningrad. It has both the Germans and the Finns in it and describes operations from 1941 to 1944 when the siege was lifted. You find out about the first battles, like those done by Vatutin when he encircled the 8th Panzer division in 1941, something that might come as a surprise to many, and delayed Army Group North for 3 weeks. As well about the operations in 1942 and 1943 which restored the land link with the rest of the USSR yet the siege in and of itself would last until 1944. For those not too familiar with the Eastern Front this would be a great book, for those that want details of everything that happened within those 3 years, I would suggest waiting for Glantz's next book on Leningrad, a more indepth study. This book is also unlike the others of his that I have in that it has many pictures, exactly like his new "Barbarosa" book.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Anthony Cooper on April 18, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book is unlike Glantz's books on Kursk, Kharkov, or Mars in that it is a slim, larger-sized hardback with a lot of photos and color maps. He also doesn't go into a large amount of detail. This scope makes it a lot easier to understand - while I understood battles that Erickson (in "The Road to Stalingrad") describes but I was confused about. Also, it's a good primer before jumping into "The 900 Days" by Salisbury.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Steve on July 11, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This book sheds light on a relatively unknown (for me, anyway) part of the war on the Eastern Front. As well as the indepth text (which one is always assured of when David Glantz is the writer), two other things place this book ahead of the rest. First, the maps (one can easily lose track of what is happening when it comes to Russian place names); second, the photographs, which are mostly new and not the same old tired images. There are also exhaustive chapter notes and appendices. For anyone wanting to know what really happened at Leningrad in World War II, this book is a must. Well done Mr Glantz
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Nick on July 15, 2006
Format: Paperback
In `The Siege of Leningrad' David Glantz is successful in providing a succinct and informative account of the military aspects of this battle. By drawing on Soviet sources Glantz describes how the Soviet military successfully defended the city against German attack and eventually lifted the siege. A particular strength of this book is that Glantz gives considerable attention to the failed Soviet attempts to lift the siege and highlights the terrible price the Soviets paid in the fighting around the city.

The book is, however, let down by the poor quality of much of Glantz's writing. Many passages are confusing or `jumpy' and some accounts of battles read like a shopping list of unit and place names. Due to his focus on the Soviets Glantz's accounts of the German objectives and strategies can also be unclear. For example, it is never made clear whether the Germans were serious about capturing Leningrad after 1941 and Hitler's role in the battle is confusing. I also found the number of maps in the book to be somewhat unsatisfactory - while each chapter has a clear and useful map the book would have benefited from the addition of maps depicting the major battles described in the text.

While I'd strongly recommend `The Siege of Leningrad' to readers looking for a military history of how the Soviet military defended the city and eventually lifted the siege, it's not successful as a general history and should be avoided by non-specialist readers.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Brian Hawkinson VINE VOICE on December 9, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
After having recently read quite a bit about WWII, and more recently on the Eastern Front, I stated looking for more books to read. I naturally wanted to read about Leningrad since this was the longest siege of the war and had an appalling amount of death. Glantz seemed to be a good call and well versed on the Eastern Front, but his writing is just down right boring.

I understand that this is a military history, that its main focus is to analyze the strategies that both countries used to attack and defend their positions. I've read other military analysis and found them to be interesting and informative. Glantz seemed so focused on the military analysis that all you are left with is a day by day analysis of the bullet points of the war. X army moved here, y division deployed over there, while x, y and z army of Russia countered over here. What you're left with is nothing more than a long list of armies and their deployments. Absolutely nothing interesting, even in the remote sense, to anything he is writing about (unless, perhaps, if you attend West Point and the sole focus of the class is army deployment).

Glantz doesn't inject anything into his narrative (nonexistent for the most part), like eyewitness accounts from the soldiers of both countries, or commentaries from the generals who lead the armies. You don't get to read about what the civilians went through or see the war through their eyes. All of this is necessary to bring home the tragedy that was the Siege of Leningrad. Without this input you are left with a long list of armies and a completely boring and uninspiring account of such a tragic conflict in WWII.
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