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The Silver Chair (Narnia) Hardcover – Bargain Price, July 1, 1994


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Hardcover, Bargain Price, July 1, 1994
$7.71 $1.15

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 and up
  • Grade Level: 3 and up
  • Series: Narnia (Book 6)
  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (July 1, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060234954
  • ASIN: B001G8WFUS
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (227 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,563,762 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 6-8-King Caspian has grown old and sad in the ten years since the disappearance of his only son. Jill and Eustace embark on a perilous quest to find the Prince.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"The magic of C. S. Lewis's parallel universe never fades." The Times

More About the Author

Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day. He was a Fellow and Tutor in English Literature at Oxford University until 1954, when he was unanimously elected to the Chair of Medieval and Renaissance Literature at Cambridge University, a position he held until his retirement. He wrote more than thirty books, allowing him to reach a vast audience, and his works continue to attract thousands of new readers every year. His most distinguished and popular accomplishments include Mere Christianity, Out of the Silent Planet, The Great Divorce, The Screwtape Letters, and the universally acknowledged classics The Chronicles of Narnia. To date, the Narnia books have sold over 100 million copies and been transformed into three major motion pictures.

Customer Reviews

Chronologically, THE SILVER CHAIR is the 2nd to last story of Narnia.
tvtv3
The book kept me excited for the most part and the plot moved continuously, which is very important to me when I read a book.
"joydawg"
The stories are wonderfully written and will engage you like few other works.
Michael Erisman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Theodore Csernica on August 22, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is an incredibly important book.

For some reason, this was the one Narnia book I could never get all the way through as a boy even though I was an otherwise voracious reader. I'm not really sure why. I just finished reading it to one of my own sons and he seemed to enjoy it quite a bit. I wish now that I'd read it all the way through a long time ago. This is nothing less than a children's introduction to Christian spiritual warfare, in some ways far more general and comprehensive than Lewis' "Screwtape Letters" which covers the same subject for adults.

In order of authorship and according to the original ordering of the series "The Silver Chair" is number 4, coming between "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" and "The Horse and his Boy". Under the current numbering by the internal chronology of the narrative, it's second to last. In many ways neither ordering is really the most useful. In broad terms, the books divide thematically between allegorical (or better, fanciful) representations of salvation history, and guides to Christian living. Into the first category fall "The Magician's Nephew", "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe", "Prince Caspian", and "The Last Battle". The second category has "The Horse and his Boy", "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader", and "The Silver Chair". I believe this last is the most significant.

Lewis himself always denied his works were intended to be strictly allegorical, and in the case of the salvation history volumes this may well be the case. Element by element assignment from reality to story usually breaks down once you get past Aslan as Christ, and even where characters or events are not made to do double duty at different points (such as Edmund in "Lion") it's not alway possible to carry out this operation reliably.
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28 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Mark Baker HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 25, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Eustace and Jill are called from their school to Narnia by Aslan for a task. King Caspian is old and his only son, Prince Rilian, has been taken hostage. Teaming up with the marsh-wiggle Puddleglum, they journey north from Narnia. But with winter fast approaching, their journey isn't easy. Not to mention the danger they face from giants and a stranger they meet. Will they remember to follow the signs Aslan gave them to help them on their way? Even if they do, can they save the prince?
I absolutely love this book in the series. I'd forgotten how much until I reread it. The quest gives a real sense of adventure. And they seem to meet up with plenty of danger along the way. I get a kick out of Puddleglum's pessimism, as well.
The allegory seems stronger in this book then the last couple. The themes of following God's word and Him using us in spite of our faults (and using our faults) is especially strong. Aslan has the entire thing under control from the beginning; it's just up to Eustace and Jill to actually follow his commands.
This is a wonderful fantasy story with some elements included that will make you think. Definitely a strong book in the series. If you enjoyed the others, be sure to pick this one up as well.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 2, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
One of the great things about the Narnia series is how each individual book stands alone! I mean, while it may be necessary to read them in order to better understand what's going on, each book has a certain charm unique in itself. And while I may like ALL of the volumes, I believe the BEST books are those in the middle, particularly "The Horse and his Boy", "The Magician's Nephew", and "THE SILVER CHAIR". These are the books in which C.S. Lewis really shines!
In this particular volume involving cousin Eustace and his classmate Jill Pole, Lewis hits hard at the British school system (I dread to think how he'd view America's public school system today!) The bullying that Eustace & Jill face is what launches their adventure into Narnia, and what an exciting adventure it turns out to be! Puddleglum is an excellently crafted character who accompanies them on their journey into the wild north, where they encounter a beautiful witch and a dangerous race of intelligent giants. It's a well-done piece of storytelling, worth reading a second time!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By blurglecruncheon on April 11, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Although I wore out a copy of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe when I was younger, The Silver Chair(SC) has grown on me since then(and I re-evaluate my rankings each year.) Even without identifying with the nastiness Eustace and Jill deal with at the book's fringes, I can recognize great characterization done well in such a short time.
SC starts in the terrible school that helped make Eustace so in need of change in the precluding Narnia book, Voyage of the Dawn Treader. Now that he has changed, there are rumors he may need to be 'attended to.' He meets behind a gym with a crying Jill Pole, who has just been 'attended to,' and trusts her with how Narnia has changed him, suggesting they try to go back. After all, Eustace's cousins weren't allowed back, but no-one said he couldn't. They manage to get there.
But no-one is allowed into Narnia without a task, and theirs is to rescue a Prince who has been lost for ten years, with his father dying and no-one to inherit the throne. Despite given four signs to watch for by Aslan, the lion that poses as a God-figure for the Narnia series, they botch a few early and get to squabbling. Only their chosen companion Puddleglum, perhaps the most compelling nonhuman character in the series(a Marsh-Wiggle: ganglier and taller than humans and unflinchingly ironic to the point of eliciting "but we can" comments by poker-faced complaints) keeps them together. They hardly feel like heroes as they go through snow and the underworld. There are two telling moments of trust at the end--after several other people have broken their trust--and the escape from the underworld is dramatic.
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