Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Simpsons and Society: An Analysis of Our Favorite Family and Its Influence in Contemporary Society Paperback – October, 2003


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$6.00 $0.01

The Gold Standard
"The Gold Standard"
Ari Gold, after years of dominating the Hollywood agency scene, finally offers invaluable tips and advice on how to be as successful in work and in life as Gold himself. Learn more | More in Humor and Entertainment
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Coffee Gives Me Superpowers
"Coffee Gives Me Superpowers"
An Illustrated Book about the Most Awesome Beverage on Earth. Learn more | More in Humor and Entertainment

Product Details

  • Paperback: 248 pages
  • Publisher: Hats Off Books (October 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1587362538
  • ISBN-13: 978-1587362538
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (59 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,595,541 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

It was very interesting how many issues were addressed [in the book]. "It's a quick, fun read... very example-driven. -- Josh Belkin, teacher of

The Simpsons and Society takes on the big topics, with a tone that's alternately serious and slapstick. -- Larry McShane, The Associated Press

The book has some of the most impressive writing that I've ever seen. -- News Editor, The Excelsior

[Keslowitz] realized [they] were touching on important social and philosophical issues, many of which he addresses in the book... -- NY Daily News

About the Author

Steven Keslowitz is a University Scholar in the CUNY Honors College at Brooklyn College. He is currently employed as a writing tutor and a Classics tutor in the Brooklyn College Learning Center. He also writes for the Brooklyn College Newspaper, The Excelsior. He was named a winner in two national essay contests (Kaplun 2000, 2002 contests).

Customer Reviews

Simpsons fans will enjoy this book.
Mark Brethers
Keslowitz relies on numerous academic sources to prove his points in each academic essay included in the book.
Bill Geston
Perhaps the one negative review was too harsh and written by someone who doesn't like the author.
Michael Rucki

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 11, 2004
Format: Paperback
As a devoted Simpsons fanatic, I jump at the chance to read anything and everything related to the show. So, I found myself ordering this from Amazon not too long ago and sitting down to read it the DAY it arrived. I had high hopes: not only am I a Simpsons nut, but I'm also a professor of history and social sciences at a small community college in Michigan. I'd actually hoped that I might in some small way be able to squeeze Keslowitz's book into my classes starting this fall. After all, my students already have to watch at least one Simpsons episode per semester on one topic or another.
It didn't take too long for my hopes to be dashed, however. This book is a thinly veiled attempt to cash in on the Simpsons craze by a college student who, major fan of the show though he may be, is a poor writer whose ideas are painfully obvious and superficial. Early chapters are devoted to shallow "analyses" of the major characters, with little or no insight that would connect them to larger social issues. By the end of the book, on the other hand, the reader is treated to thin and often unsupported diatribes on issues such as American exceptionalism with almost no link offered to the Simpsons. (aside from a token quote here and there - and the quotations are often erroneous)
As a Simpsons fan, I was brutally disappointed. As a teacher, I was stunned that such an amateurish piece of writing could be published. SAVE YOUR MONEY - spend it on the Season 4 DVD when it comes out!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Tyerod Jones on January 4, 2004
Format: Paperback
The book starts off as a poor effort to explain how various Simpsons characters fit in as, or have affected typical members of American society. With incorrect plot and quote references aplenty, the book quickly disintegrates into a hodge podge of poorly written chapters that wouldn't have made the grade in a freshman high school english class. Farther into the book the author loses sight of what the book is supposed to be about and switches to explaining other authors views of American politics, work attitudes and home life with miserably thin attempts to relate the views to the Simpsons. With minimal time the mistakes were easily researchable and correctable. I don't think much could have been done with the writing style. I had a very hard time stomaching and finishing this book. So far this is the worst book on the subject of the Simpsons. It does not even earn one star but that is the lowest rating available. Don't waste time or money on this book. I'm sorry I did!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Reader on September 8, 2004
Format: Paperback
"The Wurst Simpsen's Book Eeverr!"

This is a SELF-PUBLISHED BOOK. In other words, the author paid to have the book published by a company that would publish a how-to on FREEZE DRYING CRICKETS if you gave them $800. This most likely accounts for the terrible content.

Seriously, It's hard to explain just how terribly reasearched, written, and slapped together this text really is. Don't let the 5 * reviews fool you (the author is a college kid with friends who obviously have a lot of free time on their hands).

Speaking of comic books, this text is about as heavy as one. It contains a mere 140 pages of, what looks to be, 26 point font.

SAVE YOUR MONEY!!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 25, 2004
Format: Paperback
The only reason that I gave this book any stars at all is because I love "The Simpsons" and enjoy remembering scenes as I read about them. The concept of the book is also a worthy puruit-generally speaking. Otherwise, I think this book should never have been published. As an aspiring writer myself-as well as a writing tutor-I am VERY distracted by the constant grammatical errors throughout the book. It is VERY repetitive, badly organized (disorganized), oversimplified, and that's only to name a few issues. The potential inherent in this subject is infinite; reading this book makes me want to tackle something similar, but to do so with greater attention to detail, stronger evidence to support my theories, and the time to delve deeper into the concepts involved. To me, this book reads like a first draft of a thesis, one that needs major revision, a lot more evidence, less varying theories, more depth in those that do have the most merit, and months-maybe years-to make it better and suitable for publishing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By K. Thoele on January 11, 2004
Format: Paperback
Terrible. Mediocre writing, mediocre analysis, and a resulting title that is very misleading. Reads like a cut & paste collection from books like `The Simpsons and Philosophy' (a very worthwhile book) and `The Simpsons Complete Guides.' The font is enormous in size yet the author only manages 140 pages and two pages of non-specific bibliography and absolutely no notes. There is an enormous amount of 'filler' content, such as various list and quotes that are irrelevant to the argument. Speaking of the argument, the book has no clear thesis or coherent organization and is, therefore, completely useless in an academic setting. This is a 'must skip' book. Wait on your local library to get it and pick it up for a glance. Don't waste your money even if you are a huge Simpsons fan. The content is in no way unique, you will find it in other books and essays that are more worthwhile.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Hank Jennings on November 3, 2004
Format: Paperback
I totally agree with all the One Star reviews listed here: this book blows chunks, to put it nicely. I've read books I disagree with, books where I felt the writer was dumb, books that are just plain boring, etc., but this truly is the first book I've read that shouldn't have been published. You see, key to understanding this book is this: *it's not a book*. It's a collection of things Keslowitz thinks are mild amusing.

So, a book on South Park by the same writer might sound something like this: "In many episodes, Kenny is killed. [insert twenty quotes of characters saying "You killed Kenny"] This makes us wonder about death. But it's funny. Funniness is good, and people like it. So Kenny dying is good, perhaps. [insert another eight quotes from characters about things that are good]"

In short, it's about as smart as Ralph Wiggum. However, while Ralphie is amusing, this book isn't. PLEASE save your money and don't buy it. Ask an eight year old about why they like the show, and you'll get about the same level of analysis and thought (not to mention writing ability).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.