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The Sirens of Titan [Kindle Edition]

Kurt Vonnegut
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (477 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $16.00
Kindle Price: $5.99
You Save: $10.01 (63%)
Sold by: Random House LLC

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Book Description

The Sirens of Titan is an outrageous romp through space, time, and morality. The richest, most depraved man on Earth, Malachi Constant, is offered a chance to take a space journey to distant worlds with a beautiful woman at his side. Of course there’s a catch to the invitation–and a prophetic vision about the purpose of human life that only Vonnegut has the courage to tell.


From the Trade Paperback edition.


Editorial Reviews

Review

“Vonnegut is George Orwell, Dr. Caligari and Flash Gordon compounded into one writer . . . a zany but moral mad scientist.”—Time

“Reading Vonnegut is addictive!”—Commonweal

“His best book . . . He dares not only ask the ultimate question about the meaning of life, but to answer it.”—Esquire



From the Trade Paperback edition.

From the Publisher

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Product Details

  • File Size: 577 KB
  • Print Length: 338 pages
  • Publisher: The Dial Press; Reissue edition (December 18, 2007)
  • Sold by: Random House LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0012RMVCK
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #64,882 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
183 of 195 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perhaps his best book November 4, 2001
Format:Paperback
I've read many of Kurt Vonnegut's novels, and this is perhaps his best one of all (quite a high complement indeed, when considering the man is, in my opinion at least, one of the foremost writers of the 20th century.) Vonnegut's wit is acerbic and as on-target as ever; this time he expells on us about the meaning of life... or the meaninglessness of it. While this is perhaps not his most profound and meaningful novel (which would probably be Cat's Cradle), and not his most purposeful one (undoubtedly Slaughterhouse-Five), it is perhaps his wittiest and one of his funniest, and works the best as satire. It is astonishingly well-written. Quite a bit leap over his already very good first book, Player Piano. This has more of a plot than later novels would, without using much of the non-linear storytelling format that Vonnegut would later make famous use of.
At this point, I also feel the need to comment on the review titled "whence..." The reviewer is taking the details of this book too seriously. The point of this book is not the plot or the details; it is the principle, the style. The reviewer goes to pains to point out scientific inaccuracies and plot holes in the book (yes, the escape maneuver from Mercury is implausible; yes, things happen in the book without any apparent logic or reason; but neither of these matter in the larger context of the book.) This book is not meant to be hard science fiction; nor should it be compared to scientifically stringent fiction by writers such as Arthur C. Clarke (whom the reviewer referenced.) In fact, I would say that this book is not science fiction at all. It is satire, pure and simple.
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84 of 89 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Great book, mistake-ridden kindle edition June 7, 2013
Format:Kindle Edition
I think this book is a work of genius. I'm not going to say much about it because mostly everything has already been said (better!) in other reviews.

HOWEVER - the kindle edition is full of horrendous spelling, punctuation and formatting mistakes. It is close to unbearable and made me quite angry. I don't see why an e-book is any less worthy of an editor/proofreader than a physical book, especially if you're paying good money for it.
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136 of 156 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Underrated is an understatement for Sirens... January 5, 2000
Format:Paperback
When people hear the name Kurt Vonnegut, they think of Slaughterhouse 5, or Cat's Cradle, or perhaps even that his books are often burned in high schools around the country for their dim look at human existence. Not to, in any way, down play the importance or greatness of his more famous works, as I love them all, but I must say that Sirens of Titan is superior to his other works. For some reason, perhaps the science fiction aspects of the novel, this book has not received its deserved recognition. I read approximately the first fifty pages thinking that this book would be about the same as his other novels. I almost put it away to start a different one. Thankfully, I pressed on. Literally, a few pages later, I was entranced by the language, the structure, the revealed surprises, and the humanity of The Sirens of Titan. Every time you think he has revealed the best secret of the book, another one reveals itself. This story is wonderfully intertwined between a set of characters, and the meaning of life. I have since read this book three more times, enjoying it more each time through. If you only read another book in your entire life, please let it be this one. Open your heart and your mind, and let Vonnegut pour into them his wisdom and hope for a better tomorrow.
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68 of 77 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of Vonnegut's most entertaining and funniest novels February 3, 2007
Format:Paperback
Today when Kurt Vonnegut is regarded as one of the great American novelists of the second half of the 20th century, it is hard to remember that once upon a time he was regarded as a Sci-fi writer. This was the novel that most solidified that reputation, though it had begun earlier with PLAYER PIANO and cemented by both CAT'S CRADLE and SLAUGHTER-HOUSE FIVE. Only gradually in the early 1970s did it become obvious to all that he was not really a practitioner of Sci-fi as it had become to be defined in the United States.

Even in THE SIRENS OF TITAN it should have been obvious that he was more an experimental writer exploiting the Sci-fi genre than doing the same sort of thing that Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, and their ilk were attempting. For one thing, Vonnegut didn't care much for predicting the future, the scientific plausibility of anything he was saying, or any of the other traditional aspects of Sci-fi. Rather, exploiting the genre on a superficial level gave him a freedom that was lacking in most other mainstream fiction at the time. It gave him license to think and imagine and write about almost anything.

This novel ostensibly tells the story of Malachi Constant, hardly the captain of his own fate, but an unwilling tool of fate. More precisely, as we learn, the novel is the story of an alien stranded on Titan, a moon of Saturn, who needs a spare part for his broken space ship. All of human history turns out to have been generated by a distant civilization for the sole purpose of getting Salo, as our alien is known, his missing part. Vonnegut uses farce in telling Malachi's story in order to undercut traditional understandings of God, religion, and the notion that humanity is at the center of the divine narrative.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Ambiguous, strange, dark, comic. This is ...
Ambiguous, strange, dark, comic. This is perhaps one of the most original novels I can recall having read. Read more
Published 3 days ago by David Robertus
1.0 out of 5 stars Not enough action
I'm not a big fan of science fiction, but the preview sounded good, so I thought I would try it. It was too much description and not enough action for me.
Published 17 days ago by tdohrman
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome Book
This book is awesome. It was recommended to me, and I am so glad I read it. The book came in the mail in perfect condition, too.
Published 18 days ago by Denise H
5.0 out of 5 stars Kurt Vonnegut rocks
I am always amazed at the humor, depth and cleverness of Vonnegut. If you love Christopher Moore or Douglas Adams, you owe Vonnegut another look.
Published 18 days ago by Jon Bruce
5.0 out of 5 stars Diffrent. and perfectly crafted.
Like Vonnegut's other novels it is strange and insightful. A quick and interesting read. Like his other novels it provides a hash view on humanity.
Published 19 days ago by Ramon
5.0 out of 5 stars heart warming
The book started out a little disjointed, then names stated to fall in place. The moral of the story is never give up. Paradise awaits those who preserve!
Published 22 days ago by Bartman
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Great book and I wanted a hardback copy
Published 22 days ago by Joseph M. Schy
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
A classic that's still as much fun as ever!!
Published 1 month ago by Melanie Beckerman
2.0 out of 5 stars too strange
I love sci fi but this one doesn't really flow together all that well. Maybe I need to read more by this author.
Published 1 month ago by Alexis King
5.0 out of 5 stars Love it!
Great Seller, great book!
Published 1 month ago by maggie
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More About the Author

Kurt Vonnegut was born in Indianapolis in 1922. He studied at the universities of Chicago and Tennessee and later began to write short stories for magazines. His first novel, Player Piano, was published in 1951 and since then he has written many novels, among them: The Sirens of Titan (1959), Mother Night (1961), Cat's Cradle (1963), God Bless You Mr Rosewater (1964), Welcome to the Monkey House; a collection of short stories (1968), Breakfast of Champions (1973), Slapstick, or Lonesome No More (1976), Jailbird (1979), Deadeye Dick (1982), Galapagos (1985), Bluebeard (1988) and Hocus Pocus (1990). During the Second World War he was held prisoner in Germany and was present at the bombing of Dresden, an experience which provided the setting for his most famous work to date, Slaughterhouse Five (1969). He has also published a volume of autobiography entitled Palm Sunday (1981) and a collection of essays and speeches, Fates Worse Than Death (1991).

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Why are there two Kindle versions of this book?
Kindle "version"? Kindle does not publish a book in its entirety? I read a version of Douglas Adams "Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy" on Kindle and found some of it missing.
Feb 23, 2011 by Cosmic Giggle |  See all 5 posts
Why are there two Kindle versions of this book? Be the first to reply
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