Customer Reviews

229
4.6 out of 5 stars
The Sky Is Everywhere
Format: Kindle EditionChange
Price:$5.22
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on May 3, 2015
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
Obvs I loved everything about this book. I def will be reading more of Jandy Nelson s books. Just which one :)
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on May 1, 2015
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
Interesting quick read. Sad premise but somehow it isn't overly depressing. Good summer or vacation book. Quirky, fun characters keep it moving along.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on April 26, 2015
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
I cannot promise that anything about this review will be coherent because love of this magnitude makes me crazy and addles my brain into a heavy, hazy bowl of love-mush. Into the breach, my dears…

So I need someone to help with some crazy that’s going on over here. Like, real help for real crazy. Here’s the down low on my total loony-ness: I read Jandy Nelson’s absolutely AMAZING debut novel, THE SKY IS EVERYWHERE, for the first and second time (because, ya know, I read it twice back to back. Obviously.) in one week earlier this year. That’s two reads–and the second time was a real read. No skimming (skimming! This book?!? I couldn’t ever. Oh, the beauties I would miss!)–in three days. And then a couple of months later, I read it again….And then one more time after that not long ago. That’s FOUR TIMES I’ve read this book, read every word, and I’m already thinking about reading it again. Every time I was enraptured. Enamored. Engaged. I’m kind of obsessed with it. I don’t think I could NOT be obsessed with it if someone begged me profusely on their hands and knees. Offered me millions of dollars. Made me Velveeta Shells and Cheese. People, my love of this book is deeper than my love for MAC & CHEESE. Mac. And. Cheese.

How bad was it (who am I kidding? It’s still pretty bad)? I wouldn’t return the copy I borrowed from my library until I got the copy I bought online immediately after I finished read #2 in the mail. Because I couldn’t bear the thought of not having it near me. Normally when I finish books, I put each one in my “finished books” pile. But THE SKY IS EVERYWHERE sat right next to me, on my night stand, on my bed, on the passenger seat of my car, just so that I could be sure of it, certain that I didn’t imagine its heartbreaking and life-affirming gorgeousness. Bat. Bat. Bat. (JOE! *Siiiiiiigh* Ok…*getting a grip* deeeep breaths…ok, I have a grip now.) I remember several nights when I brought my copy to work with me IN ADDITION to the book I was actually reading at the time just in case I was overcome with the gripping urge to flip through and reread some of my favorite parts. (It happens. Ummm….a lot-ish.) I glance at it longingly. I think about the characters, who are so so real to me now, and wonder how they are doing (because they ARE real and they are WONDERFUL), with Gram’s heady, aphrodisiacal flowers and green ladies, and Lennie’s sweet and touching poems and singing lasagna, and Joe’s green eyes and guitars and the bedroom in the woods and Big and his 6th wife and Toby and his poor, lost almost-family and orange rings. Bat. Bat. Bat. Uh oh.

I’m sunk.

Again. And again.

I can’t stop loving them and the story they tell and where their story comes from: Grief. Loss. Love. A sister-shaped hole that can only ever be filled with ghosts and memories and a little pang of sadness and a sense of some kind of cosmic FUBAR. How come Bailey was called to cut the line? What are we supposed to do now? Would she hate me for what I’ve done? She’ll never meet Joe (JOE! Bat. Bat. Bat), who has gripped me tight and pulled me slowly out of this hole. Gaaaahhhhh!! The tears! The heart! The love! The loss! The roses! The confusion! The bat bat bat! *Siiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiigh* Uh oh. I’m sunk. Again.

I don’t doubt that this story slayed me because, like Lennie, I have a sister who is both my opposite and my very dearest and best friend, a sister who IS Bailey in so many ways. When Lennie grieved, I grieved as well, not because my sister is gone but because I can empathize with the gut-busting, life-exploding loss. The sisterly affection was so tenderly wrought and so beautifully written that it overcame all of my senses and turned me into a babbling, weepy doofus. It was the BEST FEELING EVER.

Speaking of the writing…nope. I can’t even. I’ve run out of words that are worthy of describing how gorgeously this book was written. And let me just say, some of my very favorite parts were Lennie’s poems, and I’m not usually one to be down with poetry. But seriously, THIS:

There were once two sisters
who were not afriad of the dark
because the dark was full of the other’s voice
across the room,
because even when the night was thick
and starless
they walked home together from the river
seeing who could last the longest
without turning on her flashlight,
not afraid
because sometimes in the pitch of night
they’d lie on their backs
in the middle of the path
and look up until the stars came back
and when they did,
they’d reach their arms up to touch them
and did.

And this:

Remember
how it was
when
we
kissed?
Armfuls
and
armfuls
of light
thrown
right
at
us.
A
rope
dropping
down
from
the
sky.
How
can
the
word
love
and
the
word
life
even
fit
in
the
mouth?

*dies*

THE SKY IS EVERYWHERE was gorgeous and thoughtful and real and moving and I LOVES IT SO SO MUCH.

Also, can I just add one more thing? I LOVE the cover–the hardcover. (Although the paperback version is very pretty, evoking Gram’s blooming garden AND the bed in the woods, it’s just not the same. Plus there’s an actual girl on it–book cover pet peeve A1 for me. Thankfully at least she only appears partially obscured on the bottom.) But this cover: the sky IS everywhere! From top to bottom. The blue is soothing and vibrant and…everywhere. Love! But it’s the heart that tickles me, being so full of metaphor for this story and for all stories that begin in sadness and grief. I love that it’s not the perfect heart shape. I love the color, bright and deep. But I LOVE that little hole! Look at it! It’s BEAUTIFUL! You guys, there’s a little hole in this heart that is filled with light. Gleaming, clear, bright light. An acknowledgment of both the loss that created it and the loved that filled it again with something wonderful, if not exactly the same stuff as before. *Sigh* … Uh oh. Again. I’m sunk. Bat. Bat. Bat.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
For some reason I've been encountering a lot of books lately where I start them and the story is good -- not yet great -- and then somewhere in the middle of the book, I fall in love. THE SKY IS EVERYWHERE was no exception to that trend, and in no way is that a negative thing! Sometimes I get confused on how I should really feel about the book if the ending is so much stronger than the beginning, but isn't that the whole point? The story gets better as you go along and who cares if the end result is that I loved it!

In the beginning of this story, I felt like we were very much getting the set up of Lennie, her wacky family (Gram & Uncle Big), and life after Bailey's death. It was a necessary set up and immediately we are put into the "teen mindset", with the narrative being told directly from Lennie and in a very much juvenile voice. I felt like that really helped me get into the characters and put a lot of emotion into the story since we get it streaming straight from Lennie. It actually made for a lot of fun at times as well because we also get the goofy over-excited gushing and lots of "Nuh-uh"/"Yuh-huh!" between Lennie and her best friend Sarah. It could have been annoying if it was overdone, but it was a nice balance and it made it cute and enjoyable! It's kind of how much I loved If I Stay for how mature its tone was -- I loved THE SKY IS EVERYWHERE for how realistic its teen voice was.

I think the story was particularly heartbreaking for me because it sort of put me in Lennie's place. I'm the younger sister and I've grown so much closer with my older sister (the only sister I have!) in the past few years and she really is one of my best friends. It's quite devastating to have to imagine myself going through that, so when I got so involved in the story, it made Lennie's grief that much stronger as I was reading.

I actually liked the back-and-forth of Lennie going between Toby and Joe. Not in the sense that I agreed with it, but in the sense that it made sense to me. I feel like going through that kind of grief, it's logical to go where you find comfort and at the same time Lennie almost felt wrong falling in love when she was in so much pain. It was a good story line in the book and just added that much more to the story versus just a straight-up whirlwind romance.

I absolutely adored the quirkiness of Lennie's family! For some reason it had a very WALK TWO MOONS feel for me all throughout the book. I think it's because of the relationship Lennie has with her grandmother and I pictured Big as the father-figure even though he's Lennie's uncle. It also had the missing mother element as well. I really think that made me that much more connected to the book since WALK TWO MOONS is one of my favorite books from my childhood.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on April 20, 2015
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
Beautiful!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on April 7, 2015
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
Originally published on alexandriagryder.com

I wanted to read this book because Jandy Nelson is such a talented writer. What through me for a loop was Lennie and Joe's relationship; it felt like I had missed something between them. But this is not a character-driven story. This is Lennie's story, so I don't think you should go into it thinking it's going to be about a boy and a girl, because this is a story about a girl and her sister. You should read it for the writing and poetry and because of how beautiful Jandy Nelson's words are. They are so provoking and meaningful, and I really did enjoy this book overall.

Lennie Walker, seventeen, is trying to figure out how to go through life without her older sister, Bailey, after her sudden death. I appreciated Jandy Nelson's writing and her ability to handle her subject matter delicately. Her poetry throughout the story is especially touching and beautiful; however, the theme of death is what I most related to. Because I was seventeen when I lost my grandmother, and I didn't know how to handle living without her.

“How will I survive this missing? How do others do it? People die all the time. Every day. Every hour. There are families all over the world staring at beds that are no longer slept in, shoes that are no longer worn. Families that no longer have to buy a particular cereal, a kind of shampoo. There are people everywhere standing in line at the movies, buying curtains, walking dogs, while inside, their hearts are ripping to shreds. For years. For their whole lives. I don't believe time heals. I don't want it to. If I heal, doesn't that mean I've accepted the world without her?”

My grandmother lived with us until she no longer did. There was never really a day when I thought she wouldn't be there, and when that day finally did find me I didn't really believe it. She was so sharp and brilliant, and she was so loving and kind. My room was always right next to hers, and I always told her I loved her and goodnight before we went to sleep. And then one day I woke up and she didn't. And my mom and dad were devastated. And my sister was a mess. And I felt like I needed to be the one who didn't lose it. I needed to be the one who still believed she would just be back at the house when we got home.

And so for a few years I believed that. I pushed her death out of my head and heart, and I just kept going through life like she wasn't missed. I would avoid conversations about her just like Lennie does with her grandmother. But it's the little things, like Jandy Nelson states, that you realize you will miss the most. They will hurt the most. It's the cereal and shampoo. It's not having her call me when I'm at the supermarket to make sure I pick up her prescription and pecans. Coming home from getting a haircut and her not asking to see it even though she was legally blind. Telling me I look beautiful even though she was biased. Talking about boys with her. Not being able to talk to her about a certain boy now. And there are days I don't think about her; and there are days that I have to catch myself from crying in the shower. Because she is so, so missed. She will never not be missed. You don't stop missing someone who meant the world to you.

“Each time someone dies, a library burns.”

It's true. We are our own libraries. We hold all of this wisdom and wonder and creativity inside us. And there doesn't seem to be any way to save the book that is our brain, and I wish I could read someone else's life sometimes, because it would probably be so scary and thrilling to see if their thoughts matched my own. To see what people say when they talk to themselves. To live all the moments my grandmother did, because she traveled more than anyone else I've ever met.

“I’ve never once thought about the interpretative, the storytelling aspect of life, of my life. I always felt like I was in a story, yes, but not like I was the author of it, or like I had any say in its telling whatsoever. You can tell your story any way you damn well please. It’s your solo.”

Sometimes it feels like my life is a little ball on a yellow string, slowly moving towards the end of the line. No way for me to venture off onto the blue or topaz or orange strings around me. Sometimes I feel as though I have no control over what is happening to me. And then there are days where I have coffee and realize I could pack all of my bags up and leave. I could just put what will fit into suitcase with my Mac and charger and pay for a ticket to wherever I want. I could live in a hotel and I could work at Ruby Tuesday's at night and intern with a publishing company during the day.

My grandmother waited to travel. She had ups and downs, and she was poor and then rich. She was single and then she was a mother and then a grandmother. She enjoyed her life so much so while she was living it that she couldn't stay any longer. She lived six lives while some of us only ever live one. And I know she would say she was in control of her life.

And I know she would say that the best things that came to her came at the end of it all.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on April 5, 2015
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
I thoroughly enjoy Jandy Nelson' s writing. Her characters are quirky and endearing. This novel teaches a lot about grief and the road of healing. Her descriptions of how being in love can feel are outstanding. Definitely would recommend both of her books.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on March 26, 2015
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
This is the perfect book for anyone wanting to connect with their heart!
If you are suffering from the loss of a loved one don't be dissuaded by the story of this novel. It is a story about love and acceptance and finding out who you are. I read reviews that described how heavy the book was but I had read 'I'll give you the sun' and loved it so I didn't hesitate and I'm glad I didn't! I literally couldn't put it down! I read it in ten hours! I'm a romantic and the love story between Lenny and joe, her grandmother, her uncle, her best friend, her music, her sister's fiancé and ultimately her sister is heartwarming and full of promise! Jandy Nelson writes books that make you invested in the characters! I had to put down both books because I was cracking up! They are both 5 star books that I promise won't disappoint
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on March 15, 2015
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
This was an absolutely amazing book... Could not put it down!! If you liked I'll give you the sun you'll love this book as well
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 10, 2015
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
This novel made me want to be sixteen and in love again. And- made me buy "wuthering heigths". All the praise in teen novels makes me want to read it.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed

All the Bright Places
All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven
$9.99

Say What You Will
Say What You Will by Cammie McGovern
$9.99
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations 
 

After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.