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The Snake Import


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The Snake
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Audio CD, Import, May 9, 2000
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Editorial Reviews

UK reissue of the former Pogues vocalist/ leader's 1995 solo debut, deleted in the U.S. 16 tracks, including the singles 'You're The One' & 'Haunted' (a duet with Sinead O'Connor), plus a duet with Maire Brennan of Clannad that was featured in the 1995 romantic comedy 'Circle Of Friends', which co-starred Minnie Driver & Chris O'Donnell. Standard jewelcase.

1. Church Of The Holy Spook
2. Nancy Whiskey
3. Song With No Name
4. Aisling
5. Roddy Mccorley
6. Victoria
7. That Woman's Got Me Drink
8. You're The One
9. Mexican Funeral In Paris
10. Rising Of The Moon
11. Snake With Eyes Of Garnet
12. Haunted
13. I'll Be Your Handbag
14. Her Father Didn't Like Me
15. Bring Down The Lamp
16. Donegal Express

Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 9, 2000)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Import [Generic]
  • ASIN: B00000I5MG
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #69,928 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
70%
4 star
22%
3 star
9%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 23 customer reviews
This is my first Shane McGowan album.
Amazoner in PA
This is an interesting CD because I agree with others who say that there are some songs I can strictly do without but the good ones completely eclipse those.
Math Ecstatic
This album has several great tracks (they all are).
SUPERMAN

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By adam david on November 26, 2002
Format: Audio CD
This may be the last great rock album the world ever sees.
Now, I'm perfectly aware of the hyperbole in a statement like that. But this album comes at a point in Macgowan's career where he's got a tremendous amount of experience behind him, but he's also aware of himself - and the plight of the aging rock artist - to wonder where he's going. Someone once eulogized Kurt Cobain with a statement along the lines of, "He had the desperation, not the courage, to be himself and speak his mind." A quote that also fits Macgowan.
The album combines Shane's love and vast knowledge of Irish songforms and melody with a big rock sound. The Popes realize Macgowan's compositions with such zeal, enthusiasm and intensity, even the most ardent Pogues fan will quickly accede that these are songs that Shane would have to perform outside the band.
Highlights include the opening stomper "Church of the Holy Ghost", the beleagured druggy, drunken imagery of "I'll Be Your Handbag", the puzzling and heartbreaking "the Song With No Name" and the gorgeous duet with Sinead O'Connor "Haunted". (Try to find the version of this album that also includes the duet with Marie Brennan "You're The One".)
Yes, there are some songs that meander and seem aimless and/or miss the mark. That's always going to be the case with anything macgowan is part of. it's also a great deal of his appeal.
Why this is not available as a US release just proves the sorry state of the record industry. No, this will never be a quadruple platinum effort that gets played to death of FM radio - but considering what passes as rock music these days, that's a high recommendation.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 21, 2001
Format: Audio CD
I am a long time Pogues fan and very wary of getting any "solo" Pogues or Shane effort. But I found an old copy of "The Snake," the 1994 release in a used bin and based on the reviews here, decided to take a chance. I come away with mixed feelings about it. I expected to hear more Irish tinged rock, which there is on this album, but the first tune was a basic straight ahead hard rocking tune. I immediately thought I made a big mistake. But on relistens, the regular rock songs have some redeeming value and the Irish songs are very good, what I expected. I programmed out some songs on my CD player, and turned it into a solid CD. But straight through, there are definitely some songs I could do without.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 14, 2003
Format: Audio CD
This album proves that the Pogues need Shane a lot more than he needs them. There are a few clunkers on The Snake, but for the most part it is a very strong showing by Shane, especially on such songs as The Snake With Eyes of Garnet, The Song With No Name, Aisling, and Haunted, as well as the covers of traditional songs (Nancy Whiskey, Roddy McCorley, Rising of the Moon). It should not be surprising that this album is not as good as the Pogues' first three studio albums (what is?), but it is miles ahead of the Pogues post-Shane releases (and even Peace & Love and Hell's Ditch, in my opinion). Why? Consistency. This album does not have the patchwork, pot-luck vibe of the Pogues' last few releases. The Pogues ditched Shane partly because of his refusal to move on from Irish-flavored songs (both lyrically and musically). Well, on this album Shane proves he can beat them at their own game, with rockers like Church of the Holy Spook and Mexican Funeral In Paris, while staying true to his roots for the rest of the album. I strongly recommend this album to any Shane/Pogues fan.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bob Mamrak on November 27, 2011
Format: Audio CD
THE SNAKE is Shane MacGowan's 1st solo album. Post Pogues MacGowan was older, perhaps mellowed, and in charge of the recording studio. The eight years spent touring with the Pogues had taken some toll on MacGowan's voice, but the wear and tear accents the spirit of the songs. Co-producer Dave Jordan, a long time Pogues technician and friend, knew first hand what the early Pogues, Irish dance music, and Shane MacGowan were all about. Not only does it sound the way MacGowan wanted it to sound, it sounds very good. Significantly, Irish rebel songs are back. It's true there is country, rock, and punk in the mix, but the spirit and overall sound is Irish dance music as only Shane MacGowan can deliver it. Two of the Dubliners, John Sheahan (fiddle and whistles) and Barney McKenna (banjo), played on the record. Siobahn Sheahan contributed Irish harp and Tomas Lynch added uillean pipes. Apart from a few traditional numbers, MacGowan wrote all but one of the songs. The themes are Irish to the core. There are drinking songs, songs steeped in Irish history, songs touched by Catholicism, an Irish instrumental dance number, and above all love songs.
MacGowan reached deep into the bag of Irish tradition for the album's two rebel songs, "Roddy McCorley" and "The Rising of the Moon." On the latter, Shane's retelling of Irish farmers optimistically gathering by the river in the moonlight, primitive weapons called pikes in hand, is as stirring as any I've heard. MacGowan's pursuit of Irish history continues in what comes closest to the album's title song, "The Snake with Eyes of Garnet." It deals with James Mangan, a Dublin born Republican Catholic who some critics consider the first modern Irish poet. THE SNAKE also contains what may be the most Irish of all MacGowan's songs, "Aisling.
Read more ›
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