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The Snow Queen


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The Snow Queen + Snow White - The Fairest of Them All + 10th Kingdom - The Epic Miniseries Event
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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Bridget Fonda, Jeremy Guilbat. The icy monarch faces a lowly innkeeper's daughter who fights to rescue her true love from the queen's custody. 2002/color/3 hrs/NR/widescreen.

Amazon.com

What begins as a simple, bittersweet tale about a widower's daughter grandly unfolds into a rich, mythical adventure in Hallmark's production of Snow Queen. Based on Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale, this story whisks viewers to a remote mountain town where winter claims a surprising number of lives, beginning with the local innkeeper's wife. Many years later, the woman's daughter, Gerda (Chelsea Hobbs), finds true love when her father hires Kai (Jeremy Guilbaut) as the inn's new bellboy. About one hour into this three-hour production, the mood turns rather sinister as the Snow Queen (Bridget Fonda) bewitches and captures Kai. Scenes of Gerda's search--through the lush temptations of each season personified--are interspersed with downright creepy scenes of Kai held prisoner in the Snow Queen's ice palace. Keen acting and smart direction engross the viewer, but those under 8 years old might not be ready for the repetitive themes of seduction and temptation. --Liane Thomas

Special Features


Product Details

  • Actors: Bridget Fonda, Jeremy Guilbaut, Chelsea Hobbs, Robert Wisden, Wanda Cannon
  • Directors: David Wu
  • Writers: Hans Christian Andersen, Simon Moore
  • Producers: Matthew O'Connor, Michael O'Connor, Pascal Verschooris, Robert Halmi Jr., Robert Halmi Sr.
  • Format: Color, Dolby, Full Screen, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 5.1)
  • Subtitles: None
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Lions Gate/Mill Creek Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: January 21, 2003
  • Run Time: 180 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (85 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00007G1VR
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #28,492 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Snow Queen" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By S.E. Poza on July 17, 2005
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I bought this DVD because I enjoy the Hallmark productions of various fantasy tales, not because I was familiar with the original Hans Christian Anderson story. Therefore, I'm not equipped to judge it based on it's adherence to the original story but only as a bit of television entertainment.

The basic story is about how the Snow Queen wants to dominate all the seasons so that it is winter year-round. Part of what we see in the movie is how she attempts to do this and how the heroine attempts to stop her. The way in which the story unfolds in regards to this plot is where a lot of the entertainment value lies so I won't spoil it.

The main problem lies in the pacing of the story. The first hour, which is largely dedicated to establishing the characters and relationships between them, moves far too slowly. While I believe time dedicated to character development can be of great value, some of the scenes are unnecessary or unnecessarily long (such as the ice skating scene where pro skater doubles perform twirls and other manuevers real skaters would never bother with). The odd thing is that I believe the extra time spent showing us how the hero and heroine fall in love actually undermines the credibility of the passion they supposedly feel for each other rather than enhances it. The languid pace shows a slow build of affection rather than a rapid burn which might incite the heroine to face great danger on her love's behalf.

Unlike other reviewers who believed Bridget Fonda's portrayal of the snow queen didn't explain the hero's attraction to her, I simply concluded it wasn't her beauty or her behavior that drew him to her but simply magic.
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101 of 123 people found the following review helpful By Terrie on November 12, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
I recently took this off the shelf at my local video rental store because the picture on the box showed a white haired Bridget Fonda dressed in a beautiful sparkly white dress and a snow white cloak made of feathers. It looked to me like Hallmark Entertainment was going to at least try to do this film up right.
As it turned out, a lavish budget did provide many beautiful costumes, sets, and location scenery, but the simplicity and innocence of Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale got lost in three hours of so-so acting, a poor screen play, dreadful dialog, bad film editing and lousy direction from David Wu.
In the original fairy tale the protagonists are two children named Kay and Gerda. In this film Kay has been changed to Kai and both Kai and Gerda are young adults who are in love.
One day Kai gets beguiled by the Snow Queen who rules the season of Winter and he is kidnapped and taken to her Ice Palace. Gerda begins a long (and in this film I do mean LONG) quest to discover his whereabouts and to rescue him. In order to do this she must travel through the lands of the other Seasons. She meets with the eccentric denizens of Spring, Summer and Autumn and each of them attempts to kidnap her. The idiosyncratic Andersen's take on the seasons was odd enough in the original story, but in this film is all the more exaggerated.
Kai has a talking Polar Bear (crafted with skill by Jim Henson's Creature Works) for a prison guard. His involvment with the polar bear is one of the many reasons this movie drags. Several ridiculous minutes are spent with Kai teaching the bear to ice-skate, for example.
The actors portraying Wolfgang, the father, Gerda, and Kai are tolerable if not note-worthy. Bridget Fonda, in my opinion, was not right for the part of the Snow Queen.
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61 of 74 people found the following review helpful By Jeffery A. Davis on March 10, 2003
Format: DVD
Wow, I didn't know you could still find good mainstream movies without vulgarity or massive amounts of sex. This was really good.
The plot was good. Seeing the main characters overcoming their long-lived sadness at the death of the main character's mother was worth the whole movie. The scenery and characters were a delight. I especially liked the polar bear who was in love with the Snow Queen.
The only things that kept this movie from getting five stars are as follows:
1. The "Fall Robber Queen" and her daughter. The former just didn't seem to fit and the latter was just plain annoying.
2. The movie was rather long. Around three hours, actually. This is a little much for the "whole family," as younger children will probably not keep their attention focused for that long. And, if they do . . .
3. The scene where Satan is forging the mirror was a bit creepy for an adult. I can just imagine how a child will react to it.
But it is still a wonderful alternative to the stuff that normally comes out of Hollywood.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By R. M. Fisher TOP 500 REVIEWER on December 31, 2003
Format: DVD
As Hans Christian Anderson's fairytale "The Snow Queen" is one of my favourite fairytales ever, you can only imagine my delight at learning Hallmark Entertainment (who is well known for creating lavish, beautiful visual productions) was adapting it for a movie. However, despite the beautiful costuming, makeup and set design, the faults found in the story and the acting don't quite make this a movie to treasure always. Though I certainly didn't loathe it, I continually grieved during my viewing of it at the opportunities lost to bring a potent fairytale to life.

Whoever wrote the screenplay must be well aware of the original fairytale, as several times there appear tiny details from the tale, such as the shadows of dreams appearing on the wall, and the words of the hidden roses in the garden. And yet, with all the beautiful material that Anderson has to offer, they insisted on changing large portions. Gone are the Lapland women, the talkative Crows, the helpful Prince and Princess and the children's beloved Grandmother. Perhaps they would not have been missed so much if they had been replaced by equally intriguing characters and a strong plot, but instead we get a strange jumble: the mirror whose part in the book serves as a simple and poetic reason as to why some people are determined to see the world as an ugly place becomes the focus of the drama: Kai does not have to write "Eternity" with shards of ice, but piece together the mirror so that the Queen may cover the world with Winter. Though he does get a shard in his eye, its effects are dubious - he's rude to Gerda and throws a snowball, but apart from that it seems to have little purpose, and is removed not by Gerda's warm tears, but the Snow Queen's icy kiss.
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