Customer Reviews


628 Reviews
5 star:
 (332)
4 star:
 (163)
3 star:
 (63)
2 star:
 (39)
1 star:
 (31)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


172 of 185 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Achilles, a Man and a Myth
Within the first ten pages, Madeline Miller's "Song of Achilles" jumped into my favorite books list.

She retells the Trojan War, using Patroclus as the narrator. As when the film "Troy" came out, we know how sadly this story is going to end. But in Miller's hands, the "Song of Achilles" is fresh, new, exciting, and still heartbreaking.

The early...
Published on January 29, 2012 by Eileen Granfors

versus
271 of 316 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars If you love the Iliad, you will find this book unsatisfying
I care a lot about Achilles and Patroclus. My honors thesis topic, which I've been working on for the past seven months, is "Representations of Achilles and Patroclus in Post-Homeric Literature." So I'm pretty heavily invested here.

I hate this book.

I wanted to like it, I really did. But I can't, because it fails in every possible way to live up to...
Published on February 19, 2012 by Alcyone


‹ Previous | 1 263 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

172 of 185 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Achilles, a Man and a Myth, January 29, 2012
This review is from: The Song of Achilles: A Novel (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Within the first ten pages, Madeline Miller's "Song of Achilles" jumped into my favorite books list.

She retells the Trojan War, using Patroclus as the narrator. As when the film "Troy" came out, we know how sadly this story is going to end. But in Miller's hands, the "Song of Achilles" is fresh, new, exciting, and still heartbreaking.

The early chapters give us a chance to know the insecurities of Patroclus, who feels he is not worthy to be a prince. When he is sent into exile, he meets Achilles. They are just boys. Achilles is already at the top of the pack in looks and natural leadership. When Patroclus follows Achilles to the tutoring of Chiron, the centaur, their training draws them closer. Their adolescence draws them closer. They begin to understand the nature of love between them.

Miller makes good use of our preconceived notions about the Greek and Trojan heroes, and then adds new details to set them apart. Odysseus loves his wife, Penelope, in a way none of the other men understand. Hector, the Trojan hero, is stalwart and good, placing family first. Paris, the pretty boy, gets less of the blame for stealing Helen, than the mischievous Greek gods do.

The Iliad begins with the invocation to the Muse:
"Sing, goddess, the anger of Peleus' son Achilleus
and its devastation,. . . "

In "Song of Achilles," Achilles is not simply an angry, pouting, spoiled brat. He is a fully rounded figure, someone interested in music, his army, and even the conditions under which the slave girls are kept.

Which brings us to the point of contention between Achilles and Agamemnon, Briseis. She is more than a captured sex slave in Miller's telling. She is smart, funny, warm, willing to love the right man. That she falls in love with the wrong man, with all the hurt that entails, is wistfully told.

Madeline Miller says on the back jacket, "It has been the deepest privilege and pleasure to spend the last ten years sailing Homer's wine-dark waters." It was certainly my privilege to read this new and compelling interpretation of the heroes of the Trojan War. Miller's style is spare, clear, innovative, and vivid. This is a book not to be missed, especially for those readers for whom the myths are the cornerstone of all storytelling.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


271 of 316 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars If you love the Iliad, you will find this book unsatisfying, February 19, 2012
By 
This review is from: Song of Achilles (Hardcover)
I care a lot about Achilles and Patroclus. My honors thesis topic, which I've been working on for the past seven months, is "Representations of Achilles and Patroclus in Post-Homeric Literature." So I'm pretty heavily invested here.

I hate this book.

I wanted to like it, I really did. But I can't, because it fails in every possible way to live up to its source material. And maybe it's not fair to blame someone for failing to be as good as Homer, but hey, I think you're asking for it if you write a novel based on the Iliad. Now, obviously when someone adapts a story, it's not going to turn out like the original. Details will be changed, different things will be emphasized, perspectives will shift. This is fine. This is how literature works. But that doesn't mean all adaptations are created equal.

Madeleine Miller has made several choices in this novel that I don't like. I feel that it was unnecessary to turn Thetis into a psychotic bitch, and that to portray Patroclus as an incompetent warrior does a disservice to a character whose charge at the walls of Troy was only stopped when Apollo came down onto the battlefield and punched him the head. No, Patroclus is not as skilled as Achilles, but then NO ONE IS. That's what "Best of the Achaeans" means. Menoetius' utter lack of likable characteristics was similarly unwarranted.

But the worst thing about this book is the characterization of Achilles.

Homer's Achilles is a deeply flawed hero. He's a brilliant fighter, but he's arrogant, petulant, violent, and selfish. He would be completely unsympathetic, except for the fact that he is also capable of extraordinary tenderness and compassion. His tragedy is that all of his emotions, his rage, his love, his pain, are larger than life and impossible for him to control. He is caught between his half-divine nature and his mortality, and it torments him.

Madeleine Miller's Achilles is a cardboard cutout. He's beautiful and brilliant, but it's all glitter and no substance. The complexity of his agony is absent. None of his actions seem to have sufficient motivation, because he is completely two-dimensional. His love for Patroclus is therefore unconvincing, and the emotional arc of the book fails to deliver its catharsis.

To cap my irritation, large chunks of the last quarter of this novel consist of paraphrased scenes from the Iliad that have been watered down and simplified. The rendition of the embassy scene in Book 9 was particularly egregious. Gone is the intricate thematic interplay, the questioning of the heroic code, the search for the truth of human nature. What's left over is...really not worth remarking upon.

I think the love story of Achilles and Patroclus is beautiful, but this is not that story.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


48 of 54 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You'll Have to Remind Yourself It's Only Fiction, December 4, 2011
By 
Sherry Christie (Jonesport, Maine) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Song of Achilles (Hardcover)
In THE SONG OF ACHILLES, Madeline Miller tells the story of Patroclus, Achilles' friend and companion from THE ILIAD, in spare, eloquent language reminiscent of Mary Renault's THE KING MUST DIE and BULL FROM THE SEA. This is an age when gods and their offspring walk among men, although young Patroclus --undersized and not much good at any of the manly activities his royal father values -- has little hope of any sort of glorious future. That changes when he accidentally kills another boy and is exiled to Phthia, where he becomes one of the many wards of King Peleus. Peleus's youthful son, the impossibly magnificent Achilles, is drawn to awkward young Patroclus who unlike the other boys won't kowtow to him. Miller gives us Patroclus's view of their education by the centaur Chiron, the disapproval of Achilles' terrifying mother (the sea-nymph Thetis), Spartan king Menelaus's call to recapture his runaway wife Helen from the Trojans, and of course the Trojan War itself. Hanging over Achilles' and Patroclus's heads is a prophecy that Achilles will die young, but only after the death of the bravest of the Trojans, Hector. The sequence of events that lead to this prophecy's fulfillment is heroic, horrible, and heartbreaking, and makes THE SONG OF ACHILLES one of the most moving love stories ever. When I closed the book, I was as dazed as if I had been part of the story myself, and I could not sleep for hours afterward.

If Homer had been a woman, this is the way he'd have told the story.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


181 of 226 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not for me..., February 10, 2012
This review is from: The Song of Achilles: A Novel (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
At Uni I studied the Iliad --a bit. It's a wonderful classic tale that has been examined and reexamined under multiple lenses and from multiple perspectives. And I was really looking forward to Ms. Miller's rendition, particularly as she has a master's in Latin and Ancient Greek, and because the School Library Journal described the book in such glowing terms. However, as it turned out, I was disappointed.

The book starts out wonderfully. I was immediately engaged as the 'voice' of the book, Patroclus, Achille's friend, was introduced. Not much is said about his background in the Illiad, but Ms. Miller fleshes out the story extremely well. And she does have a way with words. However, she wasn't able to keep my attention.

Cutting to the chase, I thought the story moved along too slowly. For over the first half of the book, I read every word faithfully. After that point though skimming set in. The main problem for me weren't the lush descriptions but rather that the characters never came to life for me, and I never cared what would happen to them. The love affair was fawning and actually a little boring. Which I suppose means I'm a bit jaded.

In any case... I can understand why others would like this book: it just was wasted on me. And to try to put this in some perspective that might help the review reader, I also didn't like THE MISTS OF AVALON for many of the same reasons. If however, you've got an interest in finding out what went on in the Iliad, but don't want to read the epic poem, and you'd like a little erotica and a whole lot of fawning romance thrown in, give this book a try.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly a 'Song' of the Hero Achilles, February 1, 2012
By 
This review is from: Song of Achilles (Hardcover)
Madeline Miller has lovingly picked up an all but forgotten story about ancient Greece like finding a clay-encrusted old coin hiding in the ruins of an old temple, polished to its original gold gleam, and then under its spell has created a novel that takes the reader on one of the most beautiful journeys imaginable. This is the story of Achilles, the brilliantly beautiful and sensitive hero who risked all for the capture of Helen in the Trojan War, as related to us in the most personal and gentle manner by his lover Patroclus. Miller goes where the movies such as TROY and the other bearish versions of the Greek warriors and heroes have failed to take us - into that rare atmosphere of childhood friendships that develop into the purest of loves and set the standard for compassionately re-visiting old myths, finding at their cores much more than the bolts of lightning or the clash of swords or the rising out of the sea of mythic monster gods.

Miller instead writes a love story; in fact she writes of several love stories because she never ceases to treat her characters as multidimensional people despite the fact they are gods or closely related to gods. The manner of her writing is luminous and so rich in painterly atmosphere that once started it is impossible to set this fine book aside. For once we are allowed to understand the growing love between Achilles and Patroclus, their training under the guidance of Chiron, the influence of Achilles' goddess mother on him, the adventures that the two lads endured and/or exalted, and the most sensitive depiction of the grief of Achilles when Patroclus dies.

We can only hope that Madeline Miller continues to reshape the glorious stories of Greco-Roman mythology for modern day audiences. She most assuredly has the gift for taking us there in a masterly fashion. Grady Harp, February 12
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Compelling New Tradition, April 15, 2012
This review is from: The Song of Achilles: A Novel (Hardcover)
Madeline Miller says the idea for her novel The Song of Achilles arose from wondering about the extremity of grief Achilles suffers when his closest friend Patroclus dies in the ancient Homeric poem the Iliad. What kind of relationship did they have that Achilles loved Patroclus that much? She answers that question with depth and sensitivity. The novel focuses primarily on the theme of the human capacity to love. In Miller's interpretation, the gods, and most especially Thetis, Achilles's mother, don't understand love, and thus being half-god as Achilles is, sets him up for some complicated trouble in matters of the heart. Told from the point of view of Patroclus, The Song of Achilles is a graceful new exploration of the ancient tale, taking you inside these two heroes in a compelling way.

As in the Iliad, from which Miller has drawn the beginnings of her characters, Achilles loves his friend Patroclus with profound intensity, but in Miller's take, this love blocks out everyone else in Achilles's view. The half-divine hero seems to have no capacity to love anyone else, not even other friends. Gone are the loyalties and bonds with his fellow warriors that Homer portrays. He doesn't understand how Patroclus knows and holds in affection many of the men and women they live with and fight for each day, including, interestingly enough, Briseis, the woman over whom Achilles will quarrel with Agamemnon. Achilles notes he doesn't even recognize most of these people. Even as a boy in his father's court in Phthia, Achilles does not connect with the other boys with whom he eats and plays each day. "But in all those years, Achilles showed no interest in any of the boys, though he was polite to them all, as befitted his upbringing. And now he had bestowed the long-awaited honor upon the most unlikely of us, small and ungrateful and probably cursed." And why does he bestow his singular affection on Patroclus? Because, Achilles says, "He is surprising."

No one else finds Patroclus the least bit lovable, at least not until several years into the Trojan War, by which time Patroclus has won many friends through his work in the tent where the wounded are brought and through his kindness to Achilles's women captives. Since he doesn't want sex from the women, nor does Achilles, being kind to them is greatly simplified. One of Miller's conscious choices has been to make the relationship between Achilles and Patroclus entirely exclusive. No captive women appear in the beds of Achilles and Patroclus as they do in the Iliad.

The novel starts with Patroclus's early childhood. His father is disappointed in him almost from the beginning, and his mother is a simpleton, as far an opposite of Achilles's mother as Miller can portray. When Patroclus accidently kills another boy, his father's biggest disappointment is that he doesn't have the sense to lie about it, and his father doesn't seem overly upset by the need to permanently exile his son. This early emotional deprivation forms Patroclus into a man who will accept Achilles's odd friendship that grows eventually into love--anything to be accepted, especially by someone so extraordinary.

Although Peleus, Achilles's father, shows warm affection and tolerance for his son, Achilles's mother, the goddess Thetis, is clearly the source of the "deficient at love" trait in her son. Miller's Thetis is hard and cold and frightening. Later she will understand that discounting love deprives life, even immortal life, of meaning, but that's much later when it can do no human good. We learn early on that she hates her mortal husband Peleus. Her single ability to love is directed at her son and even that is never intimate or sweetly maternal.

As soon as the relationship between Achilles and Patroclus develops into one of physical love, Thetis appears and makes it clear she despises Patroclus and her son's love for him. At one point Thetis will trap her son into lying with a woman "because of you," Achilles says to Patroclus. Thetis's hatred for Patroclus carries Miller's plot forward in some essential ways and contrasts effectively with the redeeming nature of their relationship, and that may be why she has developed this divine distaste for the love between two men. But it strikes me as an anachronism, and it's an ugly one I'd prefer didn't leak backwards into time where it didn't exist. Since the main point seems to be, I think, that Thetis doesn't understand love, why play up so strongly her distaste for male love in particular? Greek mythology is full of male unions (Zeus and Ganymede, Heracles and Jason, Poseidon and Pelops, Dionysus and Adonis to name a few) and Thetis's virulent hatred arising directly from the physical relationship seems unnecessary and historically unwarranted. It's true that in the Iliad Thetis reminds her son after Patroclus's death that "It is a good thing to lie with a woman in love." But she also reminds him it's a good thing to eat and drink. She means, it's a good thing to enjoy life while you can and besides, in the Iliad, Achilles often sleeps with women, so her suggestion is not tinged with criticism as the same statement would be in Miller's novel. (If anyone's interested in a scholarly discussion of this issue in the Mycenaean context, read the first chapter of Eva Cantarella's Bisexuality in the Ancient World).

The early indication of Patroclus's innate honesty (when he fails to lie about the death he's caused), while a disappointment to his father, is essential to the novel. Patroclus's virtues don't coincide with his father's or Thetis's ideas of heroic attributes--or even his own at first--but he turns out to be the best of the Greeks in Miller's rendering because of his moral sensibilities and his capacity to love. Being best at slaughtering Trojans does not define Miller's Aristos Achaion, "Best of the Greeks," although that is how the phrase is understood among Achilles's fellow warriors. Achilles, for all the intensity of his love for Patroclus, is deficient in these gentler virtues because he cannot connect to anyone but Patroclus. The direness of Achilles's sorrow when Patroclus dies appears to spring from this failing. There can be nothing or no one to replace the hole left by this loss.

Miller has a unique solution, arising from this crippled nature of Achilles in the area of love, to two questions the Iliad asks: why Achilles allows Agamemnon to take Briseis away without a fight and why he chooses to stay out of the fight even while so many of his fellow Greeks die as a result. Her answers provide a surprising moment. I won't spoil the shock by revealing it, but it will grab you whether the Iliad's an old friend or you've never read it. Suffice to say, Patroclus does not share this crippling, narrowed focus of love, and this lifts him into Miller's new definition of the best hero.

Miller has made a superb offering in the tradition of redefining the Homeric hero. It's an old project dating back to the Iliad itself. Achilles says in Book Nine (in Lombardo's translation), "It doesn't matter if you stay in camp or fight--In the end, everybody comes out the same. Coward and hero get the same reward: You die whether you slack off or work. And what do I have for all my suffering?" His comrades on the field beg to differ. They are quite sure fighting for loot and glory is well worth the suffering--the Mycenaean definition of a hero. I am fascinated by Miller's reinterpretation of Achilles and Patroclus and the Homeric tradition. She tells an engaging, emotionally gripping tale.

Miller, who is clearly knowledgeable about Greek history and archaeology, has chosen to float the tale in a mythological world much as the Homeric tradition did, with heroic details of armor and ship, but not much detail of daily life as it occurred in that place and time as we have recently reconstructed it. The Song of Achilles has vivid descriptions. Chiron's cave, for instance: "In front of us was a cave. But to call it that is to demean it, for it was not made of dark stone, but pale rose quartz." This is a magical place, and we enter it, as the two young men do, with wonder and awe. And of course Miller builds Troy for her readers. "Back in the main camp, we stood on the hill that marked the boundary between sand and grass, and regarded the thing we had come for. Troy. It was separated from us by a flat expanse of grass and framed by two wide, lazy rivers. Even so far away, its stone walls caught the sharp sun and gleamed. We fancied we could see the metallic glint of the famous Scaean gate, its brazen hinges said to be tall as a man. Later, I would see those walls up close, their sharp squared stones perfectly cut and fitted against each other, the work of the god Apollo, it was said. And I would wonder at them--at how, ever, the city could be taken." These descriptions paint brilliant images--Miller's especially good at her descriptions of nature--but they are more mythological than archaeological. The Song of Achilles takes the reader on a thoroughly enjoyable voyage into the legendary world of these heroes.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


52 of 66 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Song of Patroclus, February 18, 2012
This review is from: The Song of Achilles: A Novel (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Madeline Miller's retelling of the Iliad (well, eventually) is not your father's Oldsmobile (or chariot) by any means. It takes her a good 3/5ths of the book to even touch down on Anatolia. The bulk of the book focuses on Achilles' relationship with Patroclus, a character whose name was Greek to me until I pulled out THE ILIAD after many decades of neglect. As this modern cover will surely attract readers new to Homer's story, it might be strange to many other laymen readers who have either never read the classic tale or read it once and so long ago that memory does not serve.

First, what makes the book beguiling: the writing is stellar. Miller's narrative mixes a modern voice with fine descriptive flourishes. If you are a wordsmith or a fan of reading them, THE SONG OF ACHILLES may leave you 5-starry eyed. Miller can bring a landscape to life through her use of imagery. You'll feel like you're in Greece (or at least not in Poughkeepsie anymore) as you read it. All the expected names are present, as well. Odysseus, Agamemnon, Ajax, Paris, Hector, Helen (offstage, though, start to finish), Apollo (he makes a cameo on the Trojan walls), Athena, Zeus, and Achilles' mom, the minor goddess Thetis. So yes. It walks the walk and talks the talk of a retold tale.

But here's what hampers the book: Greece, Troy, and all matters Iliad, take a back seat to the relationship of Patroclus and Achilles. Miller resolved to make it the very foundation of her book's architecture, which is her prerogative. The payoff of this strategy isn't there, however. You'd expect that this much characterization would draw the reader in. Oddly, it does not.

Maybe the fact that Achilles is cast in history as a hero makes too much doting and not enough derring-do as fatal as the heel that's never mentioned in the novel. Or maybe it's the fact that Achilles turns into a killing device -- no more and no less -- on the plains of Troy that takes all the human air out of him. I don't know. I found my sympathies more allied with the common sensical, wily character of Odysseus, who spends much less time (alas!) on stage than Achilles and Patroclus. As for A&P, how much fawning is too much?

In the end, there's much to admire here. It seems, however, a lost opportunity. With her writing ability, Miller might have breathed new life into an old story. Instead, its climax in Troy comes too late and at times moves too quickly. What's more, Troy seems almost incidental. And while this might be fine if the characterizations of Patroclus and Achilles were unusually compelling, they are not -- at least not enough to justify her strategic decisions in planning the book. Read the range of reviews here, is my advice. Weigh what you like in your fiction. I give the writing itself 5 stars. It's the plot and the characterization that drag the body of the book behind chariots....
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Song of Achilles, January 25, 2012
This review is from: The Song of Achilles: A Novel (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
In The Song of Achilles, classicist Madeline Miller reimagines the Iliad as a love story: the love story of the great hero Achilles and his friend and companion (and the novel's narrator) Patroclus. The relationship between the two has been interpreted in different ways throughout the long afterlife of Greek myth; here they are romantic and physical lovers. Using their bond, which begins in childhood and evolves through their education by the centaur Chiron and into the period of the Trojan War, as the spine of the story offers both strengths and weaknesses. The downside is that in many ways the larger-than-life figures of myth are ill-suited to romantic storytelling. There's not much more tiresome than a lover describing his beloved as the best fighter, the most handsome, the most admired- but when Patroclus says those things about Achilles, it's the literal truth. Mythic heroes don't have the human flaws and virtues that make the traditional arc of a love story recognizable and moving. Achilles is brave but sometimes too proud, Patroclus is kind-hearted but sometimes too uncertain of himself. They're deeply devoted to each other. And that's about it.

But the benefit of focusing on that devotion is that doing so provides a framework through which the Trojan War and the world in which it takes place can be understood. Kinder-hearted than the men of ancient Greece but raised to respect them, Patroclus makes for an excellent mediator between the violent and cruel-seeming values of ancient warfare and the sensibilities of modern readers, and his position in the narrative allows him to witness the key events of the Iliad without bogging down in details that would distract readers looking for a streamlined novelistic story. (There are, however, enough hints of the richness of the full mythic cycle to give the curious newbie places to begin.) The result is a sharply-paced, very readable retelling for contemporary audiences who like (or at least don't mind) a little romance with their ancient history. The momentum is helped by Miller's prose; she has a gift for the kind of simple language that somehow feels deeply poetic, and quick bursts of imagery make the events described seem immediate and distant all at once, a very appropriate effect for a book like this.

As the story of the Iliad unfolds and tragedy descends on the lovers, that balance between immediacy and distance lends the loss both personal and epic resonance; even I, familiar with the outline of events and inclined to be cynical about great love stories, was a little moved. The author certainly isn't afraid to confront the dark nature of her source material, though the resolution she offers is not without glimmers of hope. If her first novel is anything to go by, Madeline Miller has a gift for retelling ancient stories in faithful yet accessible ways. Perhaps her finest supporting character here is Odysseus, witty and darkly manipulative but not inhumane; the depths of his cunning personality can only be hinted at in Patroclus' account. Dare one hope that Miller's next book will do for the Odyssey what this one has done for the Iliad? In any case, The Song of Achilles is a carefully-crafted reimagining of an ancient story that respects its character while opening it up to new audiences.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Could not put it down...very emotional, March 20, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Song of Achilles: A Novel (Hardcover)
I could barely put the book down once I picked it up. Of course, I am a huge fan of the story of Achilles and Patroclus, which is so similar to the relationship of Alexander the Great and his best friend, trusted general, and lover...Hephaestion. That the book focuses more on the relationship of the characters to each other rather than the battle is precisely why I like it. Patroclus' own thoughts and words break my heart at times. He lived for Achilles, but sometimes Achilles was too blind to see it or let his pride get in the way. At the end of the book, even though I KNEW how the story ended, I still cried.

If you're looking for a scholarly interpretation of the Illiad, this isn't it. If you want to feel the emotions of the characters...love, despair, and everything in between...then I recommend this book highly.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not what I was looking for, November 22, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The Song of Achilles is a good enough book, but not the story I was looking for. I had hoped for another telling highlighting warrior ethos, military brotherhood, etc. This version of the book is more of a romance... and it's kind of a flat romance at that. The dynamics are all there from the original story, but at no point did I feel a strong emotional charge built up between the characters or the events they found themselves in, which is disappointing because the root story has so much potential to be expanded on. Just not in this book.

I'm not sorry I read it, I like almost all re-tellings centered around Homer's work, but I will not mark this down as a book to re-read for myself and I would be hesitant to recommend it to others.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 263 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

The Song of Achilles: A Novel
The Song of Achilles: A Novel by Madeline Miller (Hardcover - March 6, 2012)
$25.99 $19.04
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.