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The Soul Thief: A Novel Hardcover – February 12, 2008


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Pantheon; 1 edition (February 12, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375422528
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375422522
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.4 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,183,130 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The author of the National Book Award–nominated The Feast of Love, Baxter returns with this ninth book, an assay into the limits of character, fictional and otherwise. The first half of the novel follows the brief arc of Nathaniel Mason's graduate career in 1970s Buffalo, N.Y., which centers on his friendship with the sexy but self-dramatizing Teresa (which she pronounces Teraysa, as if she were French) and her lover Jerome Coolberg, a virtuoso of cast-off ideas. Coolberg, obsessed with Nathaniel, begins taking his shirts and notebooks, and claiming that episodes from Nathaniel's life happened to him. Coolberg drops a hint that something bad will happen to Jamie, Nathaniel's sometime lover; when it actually comes to pass, Nathaniel's world begins to collapse. In the novel's second half, decades after these events have occurred, Coolberg enters Nathaniel's life again for a final, dramatic confrontation. Baxter has a great, registering eye for the real pleasures and attritions of life, but the book gets hung up on metafictional questions of identity (the major one: who is writing this first-person narrative?). The results cheat readers out of identifying with any of the characters, perhaps intentionally. (Feb.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From The New Yorker

Opening in gritty, nineteen-seventies Buffalo, Baxter’s suspenseful fifth novel concerns a mildmannered graduate student, Nathaniel, who falls under the spell of a cerebral but affected outsider, the aptly named Coolberg. Drawn to Coolberg’s sneering persona (and to that of his girlfriend, Theresa, who relishes Coolberg’s performances), Nathaniel begins to unravel when he learns that Coolberg is appropriating his identity: a burglar steals clothes from Nathaniel that Coolberg ends up wearing, and Coolberg begins claiming Nathaniel’s history for his own. Baxter’s talent for creating uncanny settings and telling details and his inventive way with language (a similarly dressed couple are "umbilicaled") are both on display here, but the conceptual twist at the novel’s end feels unequal to the dramatic tension that precedes it.
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Customer Reviews

To give the man credit though, his descriptions are fantastic.
NYM
I was interested, I was hooked, I was ready for an exciting ending... and what I got was just very disappointing.
joyce dewitt
Not much in the way of suspense, reality or character development.
Cary B. Barad

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 38 people found the following review helpful By S. F Gulvezan on February 24, 2008
Format: Hardcover
While I have followed Mr. Baxter's career with considerable interest, I'm sorry to say he has badly missed the mark with this effort. It reads rather like a short story that Mr. Baxter tried to stretch into a novel with unfortunate results. Who is the narrator? Where is the heart, not to mention the soul, of the book? These are the questions that I cannot answer. While the book starts out as a fairly realistic collegiate story, before long it congeals into a sort of miasma of existentialist pretentions. While Mr. Baxter's prose style is, for the most part, good, it is very hard to care about the characters and plot. Without these elements you are not left with much of a novel.
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21 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 19, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Charles Baxter is mining new territory in his latest novel THE SOUL THIEF, and while his trademark keen character development ability remains intact, he takes a step further into the realm of spiritual surrealism - and makes it work on every page!

Nathaniel Mason is the character with the 'available soul', a graduate student whose life is operating on a subsistence level, partially due to circumstances beyond his control (loss from his father's death, and his sister's accident that has left her isolated and mute), and partially due to his misjudgment of relationships. He encounters the beautiful Theresa on a rainy Buffalo, NY night, is enchanted by her beauty and her presence, but also conflicted by the fact that she openly admits to being in a relationship with the bizarre Jerome Coolberg, a strange lad whose writing is as bizarre as his interaction with those around him. It is Coolberg who sets about hiring a thief (Ben) to enter Nathaniel's humble apartment to rob him of anything pertinent to Nathaniel's character -clothes, personal items, and anything that will allow Jerome to appear as Nathaniel, including his writings, his ideas, and his style. Oddly, caught in the act of the aborted robbery, Ben and Nathaniel become 'friends' - Ben hangs out at a soup kitchen where Nathaniel cooks and serves the indigent. Also working at the soup kitchen is lesbian artist Jamie with whom Nathaniel forms a somewhat symbiotic relationship and soon the players - Nathaniel, Theresa, Jamie, and Jerome - become involved in the gradual 'theft' of Nathaniel's soul. Nathaniel is not a stable personality and Jerome's very personal 'robbery' drives him into a state of psychological dissolve.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Daniel A. Scott on August 13, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I like the flow of the story and how it tried to be unique and interesting, but in the end it confused me more then anything. Is it telling us we all grow up at some point, become adults and essentially become different people? Is it trying to convey deeper images and feelings meant to enlighten us? Just not sure how to take it. Otherwise not a bad read, it just leaves me hanging, maybe that's better then being spoon-fed what I'm suppose to get out of it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sam Sattler on March 23, 2009
Format: Paperback
Charles Baxter's "The Soul Thief" has left me wondering what I must have missed. Baxter, after all, is a writer with a reputation, and one of his previous eight books, "The Feast of Love," was a National Book Award nominee. This is my first Charles Baxter book and, based on reputation and reviews of his previous work, perhaps I expected too much from "The Soul Thief." Whatever the reason, the book did not quite work for me.

The book's central character, Nathaniel Mason, is a 1970s graduate student in Buffalo, New York, a loner who unexpectedly meets a pretty girl while making his way to a rumored party location one rainy night. Little does he know that this girl, Teresa, and the young man to whom she introduces him, Jerome Coolberg, will conspire to steal the rest of his life from him.

Coolberg is so obsessed by Nathaniel that he almost immediately begins to make portions of Nathaniel's past his own, publicly claiming that the most dramatic events from Nathaniel's history actually happened to him rather than to Nathaniel. With a little help, Coolberg manages to secure some of Nathaniel's clothing and other personal items for his own use, pushing Nathaniel to the verge of collapse in the process, and uses the items to remake himself in Nathaniel's image.

The second half of "The Soul Thief" happens some two decades later when Coolberg calls the Mason home asking for Nathaniel. Nathaniel, who has never mentioned Coolberg to his wife in all the years they have been married, reluctantly agrees to meet in Los Angeles, hoping for the long overdue confrontation that will provide him answers to all the questions he has carried inside for so many years.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Sanders on May 6, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I really had to struggle to finish this book. I just didn't get it or find it believable. I wouldn't even know how to classify it. Science Fiction? Supernatural? I'm not even sure who was telling the story and half way through I just stopped caring. There were just too many metaphors and five dollar words. It seemed like the author was trying too hard to create something really profound. It just didn't work.
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