Qty:1

Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $1.00
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • The Sound of Insects
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

The Sound of Insects


List Price: $29.95
Price: $18.94 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $11.01 (37%)
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
7 new from $13.76
Watch Instantly with Prime Members Rent Buy
Other Formats & Versions Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$18.94
$13.76

Deal of the Day: Up to 42% off Star Wars: The Clone Wars - Seasons 1-5 on Blu-ray and DVD
Today only, save up to 42% on Star Wars: The Clone Wars - Seasons 1-5 on Blu-ray and DVD. The offer to own these collections ends December 24, 2014, 11:59 pm PST and while supplies last. Shop now


Frequently Bought Together

The Sound of Insects + Top of His Head, The
Price for both: $38.93

Buy the selected items together


Product Details

  • Actors: Peter Mettler
  • Directors: Peter Liechti
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Anamorphic, Color, NTSC, Surround Sound, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Kino Lorber films
  • DVD Release Date: July 19, 2011
  • Run Time: 88 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004XEEM9O
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #291,338 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

In a remote wintry forest, a hunter discovers the mummified corpse of a 40-year-old man. A diary is found near the body, detailing the man's everyday thoughts as he commits suicide through self-imposed starvation. Based on an incredible true story, and adapted from the novella ''Until I am a Mummy'' by Shimada Masahiko, Peter Liecthi's THE SOUND OF INSECTS is a stunning investigation into the mystery of the man s enigmatic self-destructive motivations. Taking on his point-of-view, the film presents the notebook entries as stream-of-consciousness musings on the world around him as his body dissipates, an attempt to piece together the causes of his disillusionment.  With luminous cinematography of the vaulting trees that surround his tented tomb, and of hallucinated memories of the cities and people he left behind, THE SOUND OF INSECTS is a hypnotic and transcendent meditation on how the renunciation of life paradoxically reveals its beauty.

Review

... a poetic exploration of life... evocative, haunting. --IndieWire

Customer Reviews

I wanted him to die just so the movie would end.
mandy
And, certainly it is every person's right to choose the time and means of death, if that is their desire.
Sharon
To me, this is a glaring character contradiction that just doesn't ring true.
PL

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Dennis A. Amith (kndy) TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 1, 2011
Format: DVD
Watching and listening to "The Sound of Insects", its a narration that haunts you.

When we think of suicide, it's one person's quick way of ending their life and we are used to hearing about it on television and newspapers but what we don't hear are people who try to commit suicide, in this case through starvation and not knowing what to expect.

We often know through letters left behind of those who have went through with their suicide of the pain they lived in their life but with "The Sound of Insects", its the day-by-day narration of what the man committing suicide is feeling and experiencing at that minute.

We can easily relate or understand the concept of one not fitting in but we are not prepared to hear the self-torture that one will experience. The man committing suicide doesn't know what he will experience and what will happen. In his mind, stop eating and see how long it will take death to claim your life. But the way its narrated, there is this sense of optimism that death will come shortly.

He enjoys listening to Bach and just waits for death to come and claim him. But in the case of this man killing himself, we see him suffering as days past, then weeks and as morbid as it may sound, it's that final month of life where we see his mind start to question the pain he has put himself through.

He talks about the incredible pain he is feeling, the stomach cramps and bodily changes that he experiences. From the loss of fat on his body to even losing his penis, most people want to end their life quickly and not suffer. This man is suffering but you know that it was his plan to die and escape this world.

But with the agony of extreme pain and suffering and second guessing himself if what he is doing is wrong...
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Eric Brown on February 15, 2013
Format: DVD
This is the story of a man in his early forties who decided to commit suicide... through self-starvation.

The documentary is told entirely by narration accompanied by strange and miscellaneous film footage.

As a narrative the film is compelling and spooky. This man is truly recording his own agonizing death. He even goes so far as to tell us his masturbation habits, his bowel movement activity, and his philosophies of life itself. The man's words are torn straight from the pages of a journal that he kept with him throughout the entire process. The words are compelling, and it keeps you glued to your seat in anticipation, but the random film footage - used mostly as filler to keep the movie an hour-or-so - was lacking in entertainment value. Part of it was in full color, the other half was in black-and-white which gives the documentary a very odd vibe. As if the filmmakers couldn't decide which color scheme or what feel they wanted so they just did a mashup.

However... some of the black-and-white film footage is truly disturbing and adds a touch of insane beauty to the story. Near the end of the film there is footage shown of a lone spotted horse limping through an open field and it actively gave me chills, it also reminded me of Samara's deadly "tape" in THE RING.

My one true complaint, and the reason for the four star rating, is the length of the film. At one point I shouted, "Die already dude!" at the screen. Other than that I say watch it for a poetic misadventure with a touch of horror.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Sharon on June 1, 2013
Format: DVD
I believe this story and the documentary portraying it is yet another form of proof that a person does not have to be mentally impaired, in any way, to choose suicide. For some, it can be a logical and rational choice. And, certainly it is every person's right to choose the time and means of death, if that is their desire. It is not our choice to enter this world but how people leave it should be their right.

Definitely a film for the independent and open minded thinker.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Clare Howell on December 11, 2011
Format: DVD
This is a small movie, one you'll surely not see at the cineplex... no actor appears on screen, only a man's voice reciting his diary entries in a remote forested area as he slowly starves himself to death in a makeshift tent. Besides the visuals of the forest, the film is a collage of dream-like images, as the days turn into weeks as his body gradually shuts down.

The accrual of tension as time passes is haunting and disturbingly powerful. There's no moralizing, no grand questions put forward, no philosophizing, only a straightforward description of his disintegrating physical self over time. I watched this movie last week on netflix and it will not leave me be.

Certainly not for everyone; but, an experience you'll not forget.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Daisy on July 29, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video
This is based on a novel by a Japanese writer, Masahiko Shimada.
If I may, I would translate the original title as "How I became a Mummy."

I really got involved in this suicidal man's diary I felt his suffering and pain as mine. At the beginning, it is introduced that it takes a week for a person to starve to death without water, and a month with water. He runs out of his bottled water quickly, but he manages to collect rain occasionally. So I guessed that he was going to die sometime between his second week and forth week, but that was not how it turned out. Would he ever get to rest in peace? When???
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in