The Sound Of Philadelphia: Gamble & Huff's Greatest Hits

March 4, 2008 | Format: MP3

$9.99
Also available in CD Format
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
1
2:59
2
3:06
3
3:26
4
6:22
5
5:48
6
4:46
7
2:58
8
3:15
9
6:37
10
4:01
11
4:26
12
7:01
13
5:25
14
4:45

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: March 4, 2008
  • Release Date: March 4, 2008
  • Label: Philadelphia International Records/Epic/Legacy
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:04:55
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0014KHAAS
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #59,393 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By David Jensen on March 30, 2008
Format: Audio CD
I already had most of these tracks on other CDs, but often with less-than-stellar sound quality. I purchased this collection in the hope that 2008 remastering technology would finally get me these great songs with the sound they deserve. Boy, was I disappointed! Many of the tracks, including "Love Train", "T.S.O.P.", and "You'll Never Find Another Love Like Mine" are overly bright and strain the ears. These actually sound worse than on my other, older CDs. Conversely, "If You Don't Know Me by Now" sounds warm and pleasant. Perhaps the larger set mentioned by previous reviewers is a better product both in terms of track selection and remastering. There's really no excuse for a new release from a major label to sound this poor.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Fred on March 28, 2008
Format: Audio CD
Stupid question but... for anyone who loves Gamble & Huff, why wouldn't you buy the AWESOME 3-CD box set released a few years ago to wild acclaim? Sure, it's more expensive, but well worth it. (Box set name: The Philly Sound 1966-1976: Kenny Gamble & Leon Huff.)
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Justo Roteta on April 3, 2008
Format: Audio CD
Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff's legendary Philadelphia International Records label was the most important and influential R&B label of the 1970s and most of the all-time classics featured on this CD remain both fresh and timeless (and still get considerable airplay on oldies stations and radio shows). The O'Jays, Harold Melvin and The Blue Notes, Teddy Pendergrass, Lou Rawls, Patti LaBelle, The 3 Degrees, The Intruders and Billy Paul were all consistent hitmakers whose classic PIR records still sound as great today as they did when originally released. Gamble and Huff's induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame is well-deserved indeed and this compilation pays a nice tribute to them.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Chesapeake on March 29, 2008
Format: Audio CD
They had some monsters and I have the full CD collection released a few years back, along with an excellent Sound of Philly CD with mostly their stuff on it. This is somewhat pedestrian by including songs like "I'll Always Love My Mama" vs. a monster like "For the Love of Money" or "When the World's At Peace". I know they were trying to show diversity in artists on this CD but let's face it, the O'Jays took Gamble/Huff's music and ran with it...unbeatable, historic collaboration...never to be duplicated.

I could do without cuts 8 and 9. Rather than "Wake Up Everybody" they could have included "Bad Luck" if they wanted another killer Blue Notes song or even better, slowed it down with "I Miss You". Instead of the People's Choice song, they could have included the awesome "You Are My Sunshine" by the O'Jays or better still, one of their Jerry Butler hits. So glad they included the Soul Train theme (TSOP)...that's a signature song for them.

Gamble/Huff's induction into the Hall of Fame is well-deserved and long overdue. They formed a lot of the soundtrack to my high school and college years and beyond. Love those guys! Driving down I-95 through Philly always causes me to want to put one of their songs on. :)
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By music fan from milton on March 26, 2008
Format: Audio CD
After years of proven hitmaking as contracted producers with singers such as Archie Bell ("I Can't Stop Dancing"), Jerry Butler ("Only the Strong Survive"), and Dusty Springfield ("A Brand New Me"), Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff took control of their own enterprise with the formation of Philadelphia International Records in 1971, its distribution handled by the marketing might of CBS. Thus they ushered in what came to be known as the Philadelphia sound in the early and mid-1970s alongside the work of producers Thom Bell and Bunny Sigler, eventually attracting crossover homage from mainstream rock heavyweights Elton John ("Philadelphia Freedom") and David Bowie, recording his 1975 Young Americans album at the city's Sigma Sound studios.

If James Brown and George Clinton were more interested in exploring the grittier, harder-hitting sounds of funk, Philadelphia International emulated the success of Motown in the 1960s in defining a particular approach, commercial but with substance, aligned with similar efforts at the time by Motown artists Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder. In particular, the Gamble and Huff productions fit in snugly with the lushly arranged songs appearing as singles and albums created by Al Green and his producer Willie Mitchell, with one eye looking toward the dance floor. In tandem with the work of producer Thom Bell across town, the trademark sounds and arrangements for disco start here.

As a single-disc summary of the pair's work on their own label, The Sound of Philadelphia compiles fourteen tracks, of which all but "When Will I See You Again" and "I'll Always Love My Mama" were R&B chart-toppers, and nine of which were top ten on the market-encompassing pop charts.
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