The Spy and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Spy has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Ships from the UK. Former Library book. Great condition for a used book! Minimal wear. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Your purchase also supports literacy charities.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Spy Paperback – April 28, 2009

56 customer reviews

See all 66 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, April 28, 2009
$8.95
$8.95 $4.95

Best Books of the Year So Far
Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2015's Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
$8.95 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Spy + A Narrative of a Revolutionary Soldier: Some Adventures, Dangers, and Sufferings of Joseph Plumb Martin (Signet Classics)
Price for both: $15.90

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Written in 1821, this historical novel is Cooper's paean to the Revolutionary War, as protagonist Harry Birch finds himself wrongly accused of selling vital information to the British. The book incorporates several real characters, including George Washington.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Back Cover

Set in upstate New York on a comfortable estate, the law-abiding family of Mr. Wharton suddenly finds the Revolutionary War at its door. They are an American family with friendly British ties, but they have kept their dual loyalties from affecting their peaceful life, until a secret visit from Wharton’s own son, Henry, changes everything. Henry is a British officer and has crossed behind American lines in disguise. When American troops arrive unexpectedly, Henry is discovered and arrested as a spy. Adding grief to the family’s pain is the connection to Henry’s captor, the noble Major Dunwoodie. He is Henry’s sister’s fiancé and Henry’s own childhood friend; and they must all remain at the Whartons’ until Dunwoodie can escort Henry to Washington for his trial.

The plans for departing are delayed when British forces enter the vicinity and a battle breaks out within sight. When the British are defeated, Dunwoodie quarters captured Colonel Wellmere in the Wharton home. Now quarantined with prisoners and quartered American officers, the Whartons wait for their beloved Henry to be taken away and tried. Little does any of them know that the real spy still roams free and plies his trade within their midst.

As the war enters the family sitting room, the family members become divided. While eldest daughter Sarah swoons for British Colonel Wellmere, young Francis affirms her love for Dunwoodie and sees the war through his eyes. The family’s once acceptable loyalties now conflict and finally threaten to break them apart. But when Henry escapes his capture and is helped by the real British spy, Francis must decide for herself and her family how important are their patriotic ties. Will she betray her brother to the Americans or will she let him go to the British, and risk the honor and career of the American officer she loves? A story of love and intrigue, war and sacrifice, THE SPY touches the heart of early America and brings the fervor of the revolution into modern times. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 254 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (April 28, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1438288638
  • ISBN-13: 978-1438288635
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.6 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,643,468 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 6, 1999
Format: Library Binding
The plot of this book is based on a real spy story. Therefore, although some do consider it unbelievable, the basis of it is entirely true. The way that the author slowly brings out the character of Harvey Birch is wonderful. He creates numerous sub plots that make the story very interesting. The only weakness is the fact that the author was rushed into stopping the story abruptly. As a result, one hears no more about many important characters until the very end when some are fleetingly mentioned. The ending is so strong, however, that this fault isn't as glaring as it would have been.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Blake Resnick on February 24, 2004
Format: Audio Cassette
In his second novel, James Fenimore Cooper forces readers into the minds and mentalities of his characters, while practically bringing the readers to the scene with his excellent writing ability. Both of these things help to establish the basic ideas in the novel and make it easier to understand.
The story takes place during the heart of the American Revolution in 1780 on the neutral ground of Westchester County, New York. Harvey Birch is an American spy wrongly suspected by Patriots to be a spy for the British. Harvey meets a family named the Whartons, who are torn apart by the war. Throughout the story, Harvey helps the family by trying to save Henry Wharton, a British Spy, while he himself has to evade both the Continental Army and American guerrillas. In the end, George Washington offers the spy a reward, but Harvey refuses because he was motivated by his love for his country, and not by money.
Though it may seem unbelievable, the basis for the story of The Spy is actually true. There are even real characters, including General George Washington. The plot was very complex, growing thicker and thicker, containing many subplots which enhanced the entertainment value of the book. There were some very significant ideas in this novel, such as the elder Wharton's neutrality during the war which held his family together. There were also some confusing events, including Harvey Birch's sudden change of mind while handing his pardon note to Major Dunwoodie. Another puzzling aspect of the story was how the Continental Army still suspected Birch to be a spy for the British even after seeing all his pro-patriot actions. This book would be great for historians, history teachers, or war fanatics, but Cooper's sophisticated language would be more difficult for high school students.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By WILLIAM H FULLER on May 27, 2010
THE SPY appeared in December of 1821, 189 years ago as I write this. Why in the world would anyone want to read a novel written nearly two centuries ago? First of all, I submit that the age of a book is pretty much immaterial. Until one has read it, a book is always new to each of its readers. Secondly, THE SPY is very simply an intriguing story, which brings us to one of the two reasons that I thoroughly enjoy it:

The story line of the book is as interesting as that of any modern spy novel, probably better in fact. Take this mysterious peddler, Harvey Birch. He is widely believed to be a spy for the British, but where do his loyalties truly lie? What real identity underlies Harper, the stranger driven to the Whartons' home by the storm? Beyond the mysteries lie other fascinating plot threads, for even in the midst of war love exists, both true as in the case of Major Dunwoodie and false as in the person of the British Colonel Wellmere.

Beyond its gripping story line, I also found THE SPY most enjoyable reading for what I'll call its educational aspects. Although it is a novel and therefore fictional, I believe it does rather accurately bring out aspects of the American Revolution that are often ignored in American history classes. As happened again eighty-four years later in the War Between the States, the Revolution saw many families whose members were divided in their loyalties. Not all of the colonists were in favor of American independence by any means. Many remained loyal to King George, while many others strove to maintain neutrality in the hope of preserving their property from confiscation or destruction by either side. All of these sundry positions find expression through various characters in THE SPY.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kelly Robbins on January 31, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Although it's fair to state that Cooper's The Spy is a classic espionage work, it's not one that bears comparison with contemporary espionage or spy genre novels. From the standpoint of its having been written in a considerably different historical era from the one we live in The Spy comes to grips with the subject matter and does so well. Final analysis: The Spy is well worth reading today, especially for those familiar with Cooper's other works.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bruce Wolf on September 6, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
One of the earliest novels to gain popularity in the US. It gives a somewhat different picture of the Revolution than American History 101 gives. An interesting, exciting book for the early 19th century. The somewhat dated dialogue and style can be challenging, but it brings you back to those thrilling days of yesteryear.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Bomojaz on May 24, 2006
Format: Paperback
Cooper's second novel and first important book is filled with things that aren't what they seem to be: people in disguise, others claiming things about themselves that aren't true, laws that appear to be unfair, unpatriotic patriots, etc. Set during the Revolutionary War in a sort of no-man's land (Cooper calls it the "neutral ground") north of New York City, where both patriots and English sympathizers intermingle and are more likely to be out for themselves than supportive of either side, the story centers around Harvey Birch, thought by all to be a British spy, but who is actually just the opposite: he's spying for George Washington, who appears in disguise as Mr. Harper. Washington is staying with Henry Wharton, a British sympathizer. Wharton has two daughters who provide the "love interest" of the novel (one is about to marry Colonel Wellmere, who, it's discovered just in time, is already married). Wharton's son, who is about to be hanged as a British spy, is "allowed" to escape by Washington as a favor to Wharton for his hospitality. Cooper's theme is moral ambiguity in the face of unfolding events, though individual characters do make clear decisions based on their beliefs, most of which have nothing to do with the war. Birch in particular acts with unflinching honor in spite of what most think of him. Although the novel at times can feel stiff, Cooper's story is animated and well- dramatized. Not as good as any of the Leatherstocking tales or some of his sea novels, but better than quite a number of his other books.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
The Spy
This item: The Spy
Price: $8.95
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com