The Stardust Lounge: Stories from a Boy's Adolescence and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$4.55
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Reddwave
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: UsedVeryGood; Very Good: Really nice book with some wear, clean pages, smooth spine. Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed! Tracking number provided with every order.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Stardust Lounge Hardcover – June 26, 2001


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, June 26, 2001
$5.00 $0.01
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Good Girl" by Mary Kubica.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Nan A. Talese; 1st edition (June 26, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385501587
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385501583
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.7 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,183,880 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

"Thanks for a wonderful childhood!" Stephen Digges tells his mother as he hugs her goodbye in front of his New York City college dorm, and it's a measure of just how persuasive and potent her account of his difficult adolescence is that we know exactly what he means. At 13, Stephen was running away, stealing his mother's car, carrying guns, doing drugs, and getting into trouble with the law and in school. Already divorced from Stephen's father, Digges saw her son's problems break up her second marriage and heard society, her family, and her neighbors tell her she was too easy on her son, that fatherless boys needed "tough love" and discipline. But Digges had the courage to listen to a highly unconventional therapist who urged her, "Join him in his anger at life.... Don't educate him about what he should have done. Let him figure it out." Together with Digges's foster son (an African American teen thrown out of his home after a stint in juvenile detention), they create a bohemian household. Three dogs (one of them epileptic) "sleep on the beds no questions asked"; Stephen does his homework with a pet mouse named Frederick in his pocket; there are swarms of kittens "leaping in and out of the windows"; and the pizza delivery for dinner may be interrupted by "phone calls from teachers, more often the cops." Go figure: creative, anti-authoritarian Stephen acquires a sense of responsibility and ambition in this offbeat atmosphere. His mother's surprisingly funny, unsentimentally tender memoir reminds us that there are no rules about raising children, just countless perils and boundless possibilities. --Wendy Smith

From Booklist

At 14, Stephen was stealing cars, waving guns around his house, and running with a violent gang. But his mother, poet and memoirist Deborah Digges, did not give up on Stephen. Instead, she took extraordinary steps to save him. She "shadowed" him, disguising herself and following Stephen's nighttime escapades. She invited gang members into her home, where they smoked and played loud rap music. Enduring the disapproval of neighbors and friends, the breakup of her second marriage, and many late nights, Digges refused to abandon her son. Eventually, with the help of an unconventional therapist and the family's large assortment of pets, Deborah and Stephen grew back together, sharing a level of intimacy that is sure to be the envy of her disapproving neighbors. This is not a book of advice, and Digges doesn't offer easy answers or suggest her parenting strategy to others. Instead, it is a wrenching memoir about the things that mothers and children will do to, and for, one another, written with a poet's eye for resonant images. John Green
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
15
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
1
See all 21 customer reviews
The book teaches a powerful message in a rather unorthodox manner.
Sandra D. Peters
The writing is beautful and poetic, and even contains poetry. as well as diary entries, letters to schools, and extracts from Jane Goodall's observations of apes.
D. P. Birkett
Read this book for its tragic, sad and magical moments captured in poetic lines and scenes.
Jens

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 18, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I just finished reading "The Stardust Lounge" for the second time. At first read, it is a riveting, albeit, troubling journey of a devoted mother and her out-of-control son. The book is unsettling in it's raw, unabashed exposure of the power of the dark tunnel through which many adolescents pass - both male and female. As a counselor who has worked with adolescents for many years, I know, first hand, that the author's experiences are much more prevalent than most parents, and society in general, would like to admit.
The ultimate power of this book, written in a seductively honest, often poetic style, is the message of the true nature of healing. Anyone who has been through troubled times - and who hasn't? - will find their answer in this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 19, 2002
Format: Paperback
I first heard about this book on the Dianne Reemes show. Lots of controversy-- so I HAD to buy it. I'm glad I did. This book is so intelligently written. I loved the lists, letters, even the police reports Digges uses to further the narrative. The story itself is stunning.The ending is a knock-out! I just had to say how beautifully crafted this book is, as well as moving, and memorable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Meg on February 18, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
i'm a psychiatrist and a mother of an adolescent boy and can tell you that this book is one of the most beautifully honest books i've ever read on ANY subject. i'm going to recommend it to all my patients who are parents. it's a wonderfully inspiring story that helps one move beyond fear into a state of grace. i just loved it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Emma on December 20, 2006
Format: Paperback
This book was difficult to put down. I enjoyed the story. For that reason I gave it 5 stars.

Ms. Digges is a good writer and a good mother but I disagreed with many points made in this book. For one thing, should it really have taken all those therapists to figure out that this kid, whose only steady older male figure in life, went crazy after that male figure, his older brother, left for college? The kid obviously had abandonment issues. Why? Because his mother kept marrying unavailable men in jobs and/or lives that kept them away a lot. She seemed to like it because it allowed her to freely (a bit too freely) raise her boys. I raise this issue because the most helpful therapist said the past is irrelevant. Frankly, I think it was quite relevant. Ms. Digges, a rebel herself, a true child of the 60's, married a military guy. Why, because she wanted to escape her oppressive parents. Then, surprise, she has babies with that husband yet does not agree with him on parenting issues. They divorce and the boys, particularly the youngest child, are left holding the baggage she created for them. She then picks another unavailable guy and he ultimately leaves. All of this is relevant since, despite the fact that she raised two boys who ultimately made it, both appear to be nomads. Let's hope they learned through their own examination of the past to be prepared to be available and part of a team when they have kids, if they choose to have them.

The big solution for this kid is to teach him the value of fairness. Great, but honestly, that discussion at a younger age might have prevented a lot. For instance, could she not have introduced this concept when the whole family was busy destroying rented houses? Honestly, I pity their many landlords.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Sandra D. Peters on June 29, 2001
Format: Hardcover
For anyone who has ever had a child they believe to be out of control, this is a must read book. As a counsellor, it is a known fact there are not many parents who would abandon conventionial methods of therapy for the non-traditional. Deborah Digges did just that when she sought help from a non-traditional therapist for her thirteen year old son, Stephen, who was alrady toting guns, stealing, and doing drugs. In the words of her therapist, "Join him in his anger at life. Don't educate him in what he should have done. Let him figure it out." The world could certainly use more therapists with this type of modern-day philosophy - it would open endless possibilities, particularly in dealing with teen-related issues.
What follows is a bizzare lifestyle reminiscent of the Bohemian trend of the 60's - virtually anything goes! With the aloof attitude, "you sleep where you drop," munching on fast food and pizzas as the fair-of-the-day, and opening her home to gang members who would give most mothers an acute panic attack, the book is full of surprises. Ultimately, they are surprises that work. It is a modern day version, of "if you can't beat 'em, join 'em" philosophy.
The most enjoyable element of this off-beat, true-to-life tale is the author's light-hearted, witty writing style. Faced with overhwhelming adversity from teachers and law enforcement officers, her incredible determination will win the hearts of any parent who happens to think no other parent on Earth could possibly be going through "this insane pile of sh..!" Hats off to Deborah Diggs. She is a woman with a purpose and a mission, clearly treading where few mothers dare to go. The book teaches a powerful message in a rather unorthodox manner.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 12, 2002
Format: Hardcover
We just finished THE STARDUST LOUNGE in my reading group-- we were divided half and half-- some hated it, some loved it. I was one of the ones who loved it! Maybe because I didn't believe Digges meant this book as a "How-to" but more a "this- is- how- we- did it-,this- is- how- we- got- through" book. What a fantastic story-teller Deborah Digges is! I read this book cover to cover and then re-read, and will some more. I loved THE STARDUST LOUNGE for its honesty, from time to time its sense of hopelessness in the face of her son's adolescent horrors and terrors. Two thumbs up for Digges!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?