Customer Reviews


174 Reviews
5 star:
 (98)
4 star:
 (48)
3 star:
 (17)
2 star:
 (9)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


154 of 160 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Useful introduction, but there's more ...
It took me some time to warm to this book. Nothing much happens in the initial 80 pages. The first chapter develops two fairly tortuous case studies - the vicissitudes of fortune in the recording industry in the last decade and the struggle of the Apaches against the Spanish invaders - to introduce the theme of the book. Then follows a discussion of the morphology of...
Published on August 29, 2007 by Philippe Vandenbroeck

versus
18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great book, but conveniently ignores contrary evidence
First of all, this book is well written and does a good job of articulating the characteristics and strengths of highly decentralized (so-called "leaderless") organizations. However, Mr. Brafman fails to include evidence that does not support his thesis that highly decentralized organizations are superior to highly centralized organizations. This review is focused on...
Published on September 16, 2011 by Malcolm Haynes


‹ Previous | 1 218 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

154 of 160 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Useful introduction, but there's more ..., August 29, 2007
By 
It took me some time to warm to this book. Nothing much happens in the initial 80 pages. The first chapter develops two fairly tortuous case studies - the vicissitudes of fortune in the recording industry in the last decade and the struggle of the Apaches against the Spanish invaders - to introduce the theme of the book. Then follows a discussion of the morphology of decentralised organisations (in terms of power distribution, funding, etc). Chapter 3 illustrates these formal characteristics with a series of examples, ranging from Skype over Wikipedia to Burning Man. There is honestly not a lot of meat to chew on in these first chapters and some patience is required from the reader.

It becomes more interesting in Chapter 4 where Brafman and Beckstrom discuss operational principles behind decentralised organisations (the need for pre-existing networks as a substrate, the role of catalysts and champions to activate leaderless organisation, "circles" as their chief co-ordination mechanism, and "ideology" as the glue holding everything more or less together). The role of the catalyst as a "servant leader" (term, however, not used by the authors) is further elaborated in the fifth chapter.

In chapter 6, the discussion turns to the question "What do you do, as an incumbent, when you are under fire from a starfish?" It transpires that there is not an awful lot to be done: you can try to morph them into a spider by activating internal cancer cells (greed and competition), you can try to dissolve or change the glue, the ideology that keeps the structure together or you can join them and become decentralised too (then it's starfish against starfish).

Brafman and Beckstrom maintain that it is not always necessary to go all the way and radically decentralise. There is such thing as a "hybrid" organisation (Chapter 7), which mixes principles of centralisation and decentralisation. Here the discussion suddenly gets denser and this is a part of the book that warrants repeated reading. A distinction is made between centralised organisations that give customers a voice (eBay with its peer-to-peer feedback is an example), those that put their customers to work (IBM developing open source applications) and those that decentralise parts of their internal structure. Towards the end of the chapter, however, the discussion peters out. "Appreciative Enquiry" is invoked as an approach to bring a whiff of decentralisation into companies who want to hang on to their centralised bureaucracies. It's a dangerous example that may tempt people into crass opportunism (that is, however, bound to backfire on them).

Finally, the authors hypothesise that in a given ecosystem there is no static equilibrium in terms of right mix of centralised/decentralised characteristics ("right" in terms of securing survival and the ability to extract economic rent). The "sweet spot" changes as a function of time, sometimes dramatically so. The desire for anonymity and the free flow of information are forces that push towards the decentralisation end, whilst the desire for security and accountability pull the system back to a more centralised mode of operation.

The book closes with a short epilogue that lists 10 simple guiding principles to make the most out of decentralised organisations or to defend yourself from their attacks.

On the whole, I enjoyed this book. It provides an intelligent and accessible discussion of a complex issue. With respect to the latter, the authors do a laudable job in keeping thing simple, but sometimes it's over the top. Particularly in the first halve of the book, their penchant for telling anecdotes and stories makes them err on the side of the trivial (a discussion on Wikipedia starts with "we all remember doing school reports in the sixth grade. Back then, research meant going to the library and hoping the that the Encyclopaedia Brittanica wasn't checked out ... and so on, and so on.) I was irked more than once by the patronising and befuddling prose of Brafman & Beckstrom. Admittedly, sometimes they hit it right. The title of the book, for example, is a very strong and aptly chosen metaphor for decentralised and centralised organisations, respectively.

Also I believe this book does not exhaust the potential of this fascinating subject matter. I think the discussion would have gained significantly in clarity and power if only a number of well known systems science principles (such as Ashby's Law of Requisity Variety, see Introduction to Cybernetics (University Paperbacks)) had been invoked to give the whole discussion a rock solid footing. I also missed a solid link to the burgeoning literature on the P2P movement. It is clear that the issue of property rights in central in making leaderless organisations work (Brafman discusses this as a way to sabotage starfish only) and people like Lawrence Lessig ("Free Culture: The Nature and Future of Creativity) and Yochai Benkler ("The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom") have a lot to say about these issues.

A small point, but a fairly irritating one, is the use of the word "ideology" in the book. The authors ostensibly use this to refer to any set of beliefs that underpin a decentralised organisation. From my point of view, the word "ideology" refers to a more elaborate and closed system of abstract thought (and as such has a pejorative tinge to it). Many starfish (also amongst those mentioned in the book) thrive on a much more vague and fluid set of beliefs, norms and values. It's worthwhile to be more nuanced about this.

Morally speaking, the book leaves the reader in suspension. From an internal point of view, leaderless organisations are unquestionably superior - morally and aesthetically - to centralised organisations, not only because of their structural simplicity and elegance, but also because they rely so openly on trust (in my opinion THE key word in the book), on the belief that man is fundamentally good and ultimately because they are capable of drawing the best from people and providing them with truthfulness, meaning and purpose in their life. Problem is that not only Alcoholics Anonymous operates as a decentralised organisation, but Al Qaeda does too. So starfish can server all kinds of purposes, some more constructive than others. It all depends which side you're on.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


48 of 50 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A handbook for world changers, October 16, 2006
By 
Kathleen Hawk (Beautiful Mid Hudson Valley, NY) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
No matter how you identify yourself in the human ecosystem -- worker bee, sheriff, manager, capitalist, entrepreneur, politician, healer, parent, activist or consultant -- this book is going to turn on lights in your brain. It's that multi-layered. It's also that packed with the kind of simply brilliant insights that are totally familiar, and you wonder why you didn't remember that you knew that.

The Starfish and the Spider is about the power of individuals coalescing in groups of common interest and goals. It is about people doing things because they are important and meaningful to them. And how, under these circumstances, hierarchical control just isn't necessary.

Using an eclectic group of examples that range from the guerrilla tactics of the Apaches against the colonial Spanish army to the network of independent AA groups to a variety of Internet-driven modern companies, the book distills some clear principles about the structure, roles and ultimate "unstoppability" of healthy starfish organizations in surviving, growing and getting things done.

Promoted as a business management book, this book has just as much value in many other realms. Specifically, it leads to interesting ideas in psychology, religion and spirituality, government, social activism, global diplomacy, and certainly no less, to individuals who are poised to become more active in their communities, local and global.

The fundamental concepts are not new. The tribal system of collaboration and cooperation, based on trust and kinship, undoubtedly predates the emergence of power-based heirarchies. The effectiveness of grassroots movements is well known. The achievements of these organizational systems -- often against heirarchy-based organizations with massively more wealth and power -- are detailed throughout the book.

However, the authors offer some new interpretations and suggestions about these laterally networked human systems can be used. To improve business performance in conventional, heirarchically organized firms. To achieve social change. And even to fight other laterally organized systems.

The overwhelming messsage of the book is the goodness of people, their willingness to step up and help better a situation. The only "dark" spot is the section about Al Qaeda and the stresses it creates not only on foreign nations it targets for terrorism, but on its home communities. The discussion in that section about ways to weaken the incentives for hate-based groups and then a story about what one community did about its embedded terrorists are sobering and fuel for debate.

Today, the ease of bringing together people and sharing information and plans is dramatically facilitated by the Internet and wireless telephones. That is also the message of this book. Starfish organizations are coalescing all around us, both in formal intent and casual happenstance. If the authors are correct about the goodness and inherent compassion in human nature, there has never been a time when there was so much potential to change the world for the better.

For individuals looking for inspiration and support, this is a crucial takeaway from this book. There is no excuse for complaining anymore about almost anything, because it is possible to gather people of like minds and do something about it. It requires learning to speak up. If requires learning to trust each other. It requires believing that things can be different. After that, the almost magical nature of these groups kicks in, and what can be accomplished is often more than anyone expected.

Sound too airy fairy? It's not. It's the most practical treatise on change management and individual empowerment I've ever read.

It's also a quick read and very entertaining. Read the book. You won't be sorry.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


52 of 61 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars an organizational behavior book for bloggers and green berets, October 5, 2006
By 
Auren Hoffman (San Francisco, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Simply a great book.

Brafman and Beckstrom make a very compelling case for decentralization in organizations, businesses, causes, and life. They contrast the spider (top-down management) with the starfish (which is essentially headless ... all its "legs" go in any direction it wants to ... but the starfish still moves and is effective).

The book discusses the management techniques of wikipedia, craigslist, al Qaeda, the blogosphere, and more. Though these are first time authors, I found the book mimics the unique observations of someone like Malcolm Gladwell.

Overall: the book packs a big impact ... especially given that it is short and I was able to read it in one cross-country trip. It will certainly changed the way we thought about managing our organization.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Starfish and the Spider ... Yes!, October 16, 2006
I have a childhood memory of building a go-cart. Every kid in the neighborhood was involved. Who was in charge? Whoever had the right answer in the moment of the next right thing to do. Hands, hearts, minds worked together, one idea building on another. It was an emergent experience in every sense of the word. The go-cart was more beautiful and functional than any one of us could have built alone.

Before beginning to read The Starfish and the Spider, recall your own memories of magical groups in self organizing action. Whether you are a teacher, community leader, business owner, NGO officer, or corporate executive, this is a book worth reading.

This is a book about the power and magic of groups engaged in self-organizing, non-hierarchical projects. Using stories of business, politics, activism and common interest groups, the authors show how such groups coalesce, grow and effect change, often in the face of tremendous "conventional" opposition. Some of the examples include Wikipedia, eBay, Skype, Napster and P2P sharing, al Qaeda, and many open source and decentralized projects which are ... starfish like.

From the book: "Starfish have an incredible quality to them. If you cut an arm off, most of these animals grow a new arm. And with some varieties, such as the Linckia, or long-armed starfish, the animal can replicate itself from just a single piece of an arm. ...They can achieve this magical regeneration because in reality, a starfish is a neural network - basically a network of cells. Instead of having a head like the spider, the starfish functions as a decentralized network..."

For me, one message of this book is that this "new" form of leadership does not need to be learned. Rather, it is a matter of unlearning our cultural training that a hierarchical organization is required to accomplish anything of importance. Once you understand the dynamics that authors Ori Braufman and Rod Beckstrom identify, you will begin to notice starfish-like organizations springing forth in many remarkable places.
The authors tell the story of Dave Garrison's (CEO of Netcom, 1995) attempt to engage French venture capitalists in investing in Netcom. Trying to understand his business model, the investors wanted to know, "Who is the President of the Internet?" "Who decides?" They could not grasp that the Internet had many contributors and no central leadership. It went against everything taught in the best business schools. Thus, the French investors declined to invest, and lost an incredible opportunity.

There is no question that there are stresses within starfish organizations. A go-cart is a short-lived project; a new business is in it for the long term. The games can be intense and the tactical agreements fluid. But common interests and shared objectives enable people to undertake the initial creative act of letting go, and learning to trust each other. With that, the locus of power and control shifts, and the results challenge everything we have been taught in our schools, MBA and management courses.

Throughout the book the authors illustrate and compare many aspects of both hierarchical "spider" organizations and leaderless "starfish" organizations. Simple graphs, role definitions and lists make it easier to see and feel the difference between these two ways of organizing.

This book is aimed at the business management market, but I believe it is worth serious study in universities and even elementary schools where principles of management and human relations are taught. Many aspects of starfish-like behavior are counter-intuitive to what we have learned in our schools, not only about how companies work but about how anything is accomplished.

For existing "spider" enterprises, it may be a challenge to embrace the starfish principles as a means to improve performance. As a spider cannot simply decide to change the design of its neural network and decentralize, neither can a top-down, centrally controlled organization or school. But in promoting and training the concepts of group genius in big corporations, I have seen the successes of "experimental" projects create a ripple effect on the entire corporate culture. Over time, even the most conventional firm can reframe its thinking and work towards the unstoppable engagement, commitment and achievement that can be found in leaderless organizations. This book promises that we will see more of it in the near and distant future.

The Starfish and the Spider is a celebration of the power of human beings taking their destiny into their own hands, and a welcome break from the artificial, mechanical-like treatment of human attributes that has saturated "management" theories based on hierarchal organization. Beyond describing a much more natural way of employing human talents, this book is particularly noteworthy because it is about the success and achievement of starfish in a world that seems to be dominated by spider organizations.

Enjoy the book, study the stories, use Brafman's and Beckstrom's "Five legs of the Starfish" as design parameters for your organizations, your work and your life. Though arguably as old as the tribal way of life, this way of organizing is still young in terms of formal research and mainstream attention. There is much room to mature the concepts and to become part of the ongoing emergence that is clearly being powered by the capacity of Web and wireless communications to link us all together. Enjoy the journey. It can be wonderful, rewarding, long-term child's play!
Gail Taylor, Tomorrow Makers, Inc.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A starfish organization can overtake your industry by storm!, January 22, 2008
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
In this book, the authors address the differences between starfish and spider organizations. A spider has a tiny head and eight legs coming out of a central body. If you chop off the spider's head, it dies. A centralized organization has a clear leader who's in charge. Get rid of the leader and you paralyze the organization. A decentralized organization is a starfish. The starfish doesn't have a head. The major organs are replicated throughout each and every arm.

In 2005, MGM sued Grokster because it allowed the sharing of music and movies over the Internet. Five years earlier, Napster was sued for allowing file sharing. The recording industry went after the people who were swapping the music as well. But this did not prevent the problem of music piracy. The harder they fought, the stronger the opposition grew. The best explanation for these events comes from a book by Tom Nevins about the Apaches.

Spanish explorer Cortes fought the Aztec, who had a central government, and took their gold; killed their leader; and starved the city's inhabitants. Two years later the entire Aztec empire had collapsed. The same fate befell the Incas. But they lost against the Apaches. It was all about the way the Apaches were organized as a society. The Apaches distributed political power and had very little centralization. They persevered because they were decentralized. A centralized organization has a clear leader who's in charge. In a decentralized system there's no clear leader and no hierarchy. The power is distributed among all the people and across geographic regions. Instead of a chief, the Apaches had a Nant'an--a spiritual and cultural leader who led by example. As soon as the Spaniards killed a Nant'an, a new one would emerge. No one person was essential to the overall well-being of Apache society. When attacked, a decentralized organization tends to become even more open and decentralized. Every time the labels sue a Napster, a new player comes onto the scene that's even more decentralized and more difficult to battle. The harder you fight a decentralized opponent, the stronger it gets.

Some examples of starfish organizations:

(a) The Internet is a decentralized starfish network where no one is in charge. Spider organizations have structures, hierarchies, and a president.
(b) At Alcoholics Anonymous, no one is in charge. If you were to ask how many members or chapters it has, there'd be no way to tell because it is an open system. An open system doesn't have centralized intelligence; the intelligence is spread throughout the system. Spider organizations weave their webs over long periods of time, but the starfish can take over an entire industry in the blink of an eye.
(c) Craigslist attracts three billion page views a month. The way craigslist runs is that people who use it post, and if they find something inappropriate they flag it for approval. So the people who use the site run it. It allows users to interact with each other directly without anybody telling anybody else what they can and cannot do. In an open system, what matters most isn't the CEO, but whether the leadership is trusting enough of members to leave them alone.
(d) The first popular browser for surfing the Web came from the University of Illinois. But the University did not respond when engineers sent patches to be integrated, so they decided to post the patches on their own and called the project Apache. The software was completely open-source, and Apache quickly became the industry standard, with 67 percent of websites running on it.
(e) Wikipedia allows website users to easily edit, police, and contribute the content of the site themselves. Put people into an open system and they'll automatically want to contribute! When you give people freedom you get incredible creativity and a variety of expressions.

Differences between Spider organizations and starfish organizations:

(a) Most centralized organizations are divided into departments. If a spider loses a leg, its mobility is significantly affected. Units of a decentralized organization are completely autonomous. Cut off a unit and, like a starfish, the organization does just fine.
(b) In spider companies, power is concentrated at the top. In starfish organizations, power is spread throughout.
(c) Decentralized organizations are fluid. Centralized organizations depend more on rigid structure. It is possible to count the members of any spider organization, but members of starfish organizations are impossible to count because anyone can become a member.
(d) Information in centralized organizations is processed through headquarters. In open systems, communication occurs directly between members.
(e) In decentralized organizations, the founder plays the role of a catalyst. He would lead by example, but he never forces his views on others. A catalyst gets the decentralized organization going and then cedes control to the members.

Strategies to combat a starfish invasion:

(a) Ideology, the shared philosophy among members, is the glue that holds decentralized organizations together. If the ideology can be successfully changed, the results are detrimental.
(b) The Apaches remained a significant threat until the Americans prevailed by giving the Nant'ans cattle. Once people gain a right to property they quickly seek out a centralized system to protect their interests. The moment you introduce property rights, the starfish organization turns into a spider.
(c) If you can't beat them, join them. The best opponent for a starfish organization is another starfish.

This is by far the best business management book I have read this year!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great book, but conveniently ignores contrary evidence, September 16, 2011
This review is from: The Starfish and the Spider: The Unstoppable Power of Leaderless Organizations (Paperback)
First of all, this book is well written and does a good job of articulating the characteristics and strengths of highly decentralized (so-called "leaderless") organizations. However, Mr. Brafman fails to include evidence that does not support his thesis that highly decentralized organizations are superior to highly centralized organizations. This review is focused on what the book leaves out.

Primarily, the book fails to address the weaknesses associated with leaderless organizations. While there are multiple tradeoffs associated with decentralization, one is that leaderless organizations cannot conduct complicated operations. For example, al-Qaeda (post-9/11), became extremely decentralized. They essentially became a leaderless organization. Since that time, they have been unable to achieve significant impacts. They used to have the ability to coordinate simultaneous attacks on multiple targets. Now, they are largely reduced to uncoordinated lone wolf operations. Synchronization generally requires some kind of guiding hand (i.e. centralized authority). Consider NASA. Would you really want a decentralized, leaderless organization building and operating the space shuttle? Ironically, one of the explanations for the shuttle disaster is that NASA had become too decentralized to effectively monitor and control shuttle operations. The more complicated the endeavor, generally, the more centralization is required.

Also, in my opinion, the author often confuses the business with the service it provides. Consider Craiglist or E-bay - two example used in the book. Both provide a service that essentially links buyers and sellers. But, then again, the local flea market does the exact same thing. The difference between the flea market and Craigslist is Craiglist takes advantage of the power of the Internet while a flea market generally speaking does not. The organizations (which is what the book is about) that run e-Bay and the auction house are fundamentally both hierarchical and centralized. It is the marketplace (i.e. the service they provide) not the organization that is fundamentally decentralized.

While there are more flaws, I have highlighted two. In the final analysis, ask yourself, if leaderless organizations are so powerful, than why haven't they taken over the world? For every e-Bay there is an Amazon. For every al-Qaeda a United States or China. The truth is the decision to centralize or decentralize is dependent upon a variety of factors and each situation will be unique. Pick the form that makes the most sense for your organization.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding and Thought Provoking, December 26, 2006
By 
Donna Gooding Rossi (Springfield, VA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is an exceptional book addressing how decentralized organizations flourish. It is easy to read, yet stimulates exploratory thinking beyond its words. The suggestions in the Starfish and the Spider can impact society on the grand scale from fighting terrorism worldwide to defeating alcoholism. As a university professor, I read many business books. This is one of the best. I have recommended it to my graduate students, and they have unanimously agreed it is great.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Challenging Thoughts for leaders, February 4, 2007
The thesis of the book is that organizations that are organized in autonomous cells are unstoppable and require different competitive techniques than those that are centralized with a leader. The analogy he uses is the starfish. If you cut a starfish in half, you get 2 starfish. If you cut it into 5 parts, you get 5 starfish. Unlike a traditional organization (the spider) where you cut off the head and you kill the organization.

Starfish - decentralized, get stronger if broken up, decentralize more when attacked, smaller win (diseconomy of scale), flat is better than heirarchy.

Spiders - centralized, die if the head is cut off, centralize more when attacked.

The books cites many examples of leaderless organizations (or ones that have some characterisitcs of one) including Al Qaida, Napster, Kazaa etc, the Apaches during Spanish times, Craiglist etc.

Good book, interesting read. Challenging thoughts.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sometimes the obvious gets missed, February 6, 2007
By 
H. Soza (San Jose, CA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I wish that more of our elected leaders / business leaders had the mental aptitude to grasp the implications of the theories put forward in this short book. Many of our problems today are the result of leaders who try to defeat "starfish" entities using "spider" techniques (e.g. shock and awe, surges, lawsuits, hostile takeovers, etc..) We waste energy, treasure and lives because we have been too lazy to truly understand what we are fighting, or the actual opportunity that stands before us.

History has shown that people are actually quite clever at solving problems once the situation has been properly explained. This book goes a long way to explain and categorize a type of social organization that will defy certain forms of force, and thrive in specific environments, regardless of the external forces. To deal with a new entity, in politics / business / society, we must first understand what we are confronting. Otherwise, we're sort of in a Ready - Fire - Aim mode. This book promotes and defines a mindset that is desperately needed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Elusive Nodes, July 31, 2007
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This book offers an excellent discussion of the extremely elusive concept of networked type of organizations which social scientists refer to as organizations where decision making power is distributed and whose structure is flat. Such an organization consists of semi-autonomous nodes or cells linked and given cohesion by one or more factors such as kinship, mutual experiences, ethnic culture, or common ideology. In the 21st Century the Global Telecommunications Network (sic) serves as an enabler to networked type of organizations. The book, "Networks and Netwars" (Rand 2001, Amazon.com) provides a formal explanation of networked type of organizations, but will leave many folks still wondering about the anatomy of a networked type of organization.

The book quit effectively uses examples and the analogy of a starfish to both demonstrate and explain how networked type of organizations actually work in practice. This is very important and helpful because such organizations are becoming increasingly more common, but are very difficult for persons used to hierarchical organizations to understand. The book explains for example how the command and control system for al Qaeda cannot be knocked out because it does not exist. More ominously the book notes that as the U.S. increasingly centralizes its efforts against al Qaeda the harder it will be to cope with terrorist operations and threats.

There are now several first rate books available now on networked type of organizations, but this one is probably the best because of the clarity with which it explains what networked type of organizations are and how they really work. It is a shame that the U.S. Intelligence and National Security Communities appear unable to come to grips with geographically dispersed cell of one or more individuals using distributed decision making, and linked by such tenuous ties as personal relationships and shared ideology. This book offers some suggestions for dealing with networked type of organizations, but one is left with the impression that nobody is listening.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 218 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

The Starfish and the Spider: The Unstoppable Power of Leaderless Organizations
$16.00 $11.93
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.