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The Starry Wisdom: A Tribute To H.P. Lovecraft Paperback – January 1, 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Creation Books; Revised edition (January 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1840680873
  • ISBN-13: 978-1840680874
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 7.2 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,246,565 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Over twenty Lovecraft-inspired visions of cosmic transformation present fantasies and visions of social collapse, genetic engineering, and some chilling portraits of the future. These new, unpublished prose pieces and graphic works accompany some reprints to present a diverse spectrum of contributor talents; from Ramsey Campbell and Brian Lumley to J. B. Ballard. -- Midwest Book Review --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Member of underground band 'Photographed by Lightning from 1984 to the present, releasing music on Fierce (home of the Pooh Sticks), Situation Normal and ONEIROS MUSIC labels. Author of "Savoy - A Serious Life", a biography of Savoy Books and a study of the New Worlds 60s SF scene and its legacy. (pub Savoy Books) ("Winner of the International Horror Guild Award for Outstanding Achievement (best nonfiction title), 2004"). Short fiction, interviews and articles have appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies including 'Rapid Eye', 'Beat Scene', 'Nox', 'Cold Cuts III', and 'Impulse'.

John Ramsey Campbell (born 4 January 1946 in Liverpool) is an English horror fiction author. Since he first came to prominence in the mid-1960s, critics have cited Campbell as one of the leading writers in his field: T. E. D. Klein has written that "Campbell reigns supreme in the field today". Campbell's supernatural horror novels include Incarnate (1983), in which the boundaries between dream and reality are gradually broken down; and Midnight Sun (1990), in which an alien entity apparently seeks entry to the world through the mind of a children's writer. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

The worst part of it all are the four essays.
Dieter Nagy
The artwork was exquisite, but it was presented in very cramped panels.
Matthew T. Carpenter
Nothing else could match it, too bad for the rest.
lifeless1

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By TorridlyBoredShopper VINE VOICE on March 19, 2003
Format: Paperback
Within the confines of Lovecraftian tributes there are sometimes successes that combine elements of the fantastical with the bizarre, mixed results that couple the failings of one author with the successes of another, or - in the most rare instances - there are failures that can be found utterly without merit. These are the wonderful worlds that we throw ourselves into whenever purchasing a set of names attributed to a larger creator, and its something I normally fear because I've touched the eye of the proverbial oven one too many times. Still, within The Starry Wisdom, you have something of the middle man of the bunch, giving you pieces of the lore that are actually well-written and concise, as well as pieces that have no redeeming qualities, however. Unfortunately that is the lifeblood of many collected pieces, however, and everything has to be taken as such because of this. Happily, though, I have to say that there are some things in the book that I wouldn't want to be without.
Of all the stories within the chronicled tales here, there is an artistic adaptation of Lovecraft's Call of Cthulhu done by John Coulthart that is immaculately done. The quality of the work is fantastic and captures the visions within the madness so very well. Few things merit praise as much as this does, and it truly makes the book worth buying by itself. Still, there are other noteable contributions that add to this as well, including a little Robert M. Price (A Thousand Young), some Brian Lumley (The Night Sea-Maid Went Down), David Conway (Black Static), Ramsey Campbell (Potential), William S. Burroughs (Wind Die, You Die, We Die) and a little Allan Moore (The Courtyard).
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15 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Dark Mechanicus JSG on December 14, 2004
Format: Paperback
"The Starry Wisdom: A Tribute to H.P. Lovecraft" is far more than a tribute. It is an update, a confirmation of the First Article of Faith of the Esoteric Order of Dagon: that with strange aeons, even Death may Die.

It is a collection of illustrations and poems and wickedly twisted tales that pay homage to the Grandmaster, the Old Man of Providence---and then venture further into the darkness, without an oil lamp. Here you will find stories of a world inverted, of reason cast into the mad grinning abyss of the Universal and Uncaring, of a universe itself unhinged and gone mad. The writing is mad; the illustrations themselves, with which this nasty little volume is peppered, scream their insanity. This is not a safe volume. Here you will find no reclusive bachelor scholars penning correspondence to other sequestered academics.

This book will not comfort you. It will not give you a whiff of the familiar. It will not tuck you into bed at night. Quite possibly, it will pull itself across your floor with its toothy, fleshy suckers, crawl into bed with you, and introduce you to the glory of the polymorphous Azazoth. Here are 21 short tales (two of them pen-and-ink depictions), four "essays" on Lovecraft (penned, evidently, by deranged former academics in rubber rooms) and the collection's crowning glory, John Coulthart's masterful graphic adaptation of Lovecraft's seminal "Call of Cthulhu". This is a black tome of infestation, sexual evil, corruption.

Think back to the first time you read H.P. Lovecraft; what disturbed you?
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Blair Cordero on August 14, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A really good book & must have for any Lovecraftian or Necronomicon fan! Has many diverse authors saying their piece about The Cthulhu Mythos & even has part of a B&W comic. This collection is almost a Necronomicon in it's own right!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jesse J. Salens on July 1, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am an avid reader of Lovecraft's works, but tend to stay away from many of the extensions to his mythos cycle. Many writers in the mythos tend to twist old stories and introduce concepts such as "good and evil" which are absent from Lovecraft's works. This book though tends to be more independent and with elements which pay tribute to Lovecraft without being direct take-offs. I found the majority of the works fun to read and would definitely recommend this book to any fan of the master of the short-horror.
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By lifeless1 on March 15, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The first story was too good. Nothing else could match it, too bad for the rest. A few of the others came close.
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5 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on September 29, 2001
Format: Paperback
I'll start with the positive aspects of the volume. Couthart's illustrated version of "The Call of Cthulhu" is really fantastic, and it's honestly almost worth the price of the entire volume. Without it the book would not have been worth publishing. As far as the tributes to Lovecraft go, Lumley's contribution is an interesting take on the encounter at sea theme. Also, Burroughs' "Wind Die. You Die. We Die." is excellent. They both capture the spirit of Lovecraft - there's something that's incomprehensibly terrible close by but never fully exposed. Some readers may find some of the other more traditional Lovecraft adaptations to be worthwhile reading, but these three pieces stick out as the best of the volume.
I didn't like the rest of the volume. Readers' opinions of this volume will vary with their attitudes toward the newer styles of Lovecraft adaptations. Those who like a more traditional and faithful approach will find the rest of the volume lacking. On the other hand, those who like modern, and even postmodern, interpretations of the Lovecraftian mythos will appreciate the rest of the book.
Many of the stories in "The Starry Wisdom" have graphic depictions of the violence and corruption that always takes place slightly out of view in the more traditional Lovecraft adaptations. Other stories have nothing to do with the Lovecraft mythos, and a few are almost nonsensical. While this is fine, the traditional Lovecraft fan should be forewarned. I have always enjoyed Lovecraft and certain of his imitators not because of what they include in stories, but because of what they leave up to the imagination. People who agree with this last opinion will most likely be disappointed by much of the volume.
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