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The 9 Steps to Financial Freedom: Practical and Spiritual Steps So You Can Stop Worrying Paperback – December 5, 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 338 pages
  • Publisher: Three Rivers Press; 1st edition (December 5, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0609801864
  • ISBN-13: 978-0609801864
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 3 x 12 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (203 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #400,989 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

When Suze Orman was 13 she watched her father dive into the flames of his burning take-out chicken shack in order to rescue his cash register. In that moment Orman learned that money was more important than life itself. And so it became her quest to be rich. But years later, when Orman became a wealthy broker with a huge investment firm, she was profoundly unhappy. What went wrong? She had not yet achieved financial freedom. In her nine-step program, Orman covers the ingredients to financial success--confronting our beliefs and fears, learning the nuts and bolts (and insiders secrets!) of savvy management, and finding the spiritual trust that leads to abundance. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Orman is the head of her own financial-planning firm, a certified retirement specialist, and a best-selling author (You've Earned It, Don't Lose It, LJ 1/95). In her latest work, she analyzes the psychological and spiritual factors involved in how we perceive money. Her definition of financial freedom is "when you have power over your fears and anxieties instead of the other way around." Through case studies, Orman illustrates the psychological importance of money and its effect on our lives. She offers practical guidelines for investing, preparing a budget, purchasing a home, getting out of debt, and writing a will. A helpful financial worksheet is included. Orman's insightful guide is highly recommended to public libraries.?Lucy T. Heckman, St. John's Univ. Lib., Jamaica, N.Y.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Suze Orman has been called "a force in the world of personal finance" and a "one-woman financial advice powerhouse" by USA Today. A two-time Emmy Award-winning television host, #1 New York Times bestselling author, magazine and online columnist, writer/producer, and one of the top motivational speakers in the world today, Orman is undeniably America's most recognized expert on personal finance.

Orman has written seven consecutive New York Times bestsellers and has written, co-produced, and hosted six PBS specials based on her books. She is the host of the award-winning Suze Orman Show, which airs on CNBC and XM and Sirius radio, and a contributing editor to O: The Oprah Magazine.

Orman was twice named one of the "Time 100," Time magazine's list of the world's most influential people, and was the recipient of the National Equality Award from the Human Rights Campaign. In 2009 she received an honorary doctor of humane letters degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Orman, a Certified Financial Planner™ professional, directed the Suze Orman Financial Group from 1987 to 1997, served as Vice President--Investments for Prudential Bache Securities from 1983 to 1987, and was an account executive at Merrill Lynch from 1980 to 1983. Prior to that, she worked as a waitress at the Buttercup Bakery in Berkeley, California, from 1973 to 1980.

Customer Reviews

I recently read the book, "9 Steps To Financial Freedom" by Suze Orman.
LaDonna D. Vick
I read her book years (took it out of the library) and I've gone back to it so often, for reference, that I finally decided to buy it.
Julie C
Unfortunately, I give it negative (-3) stars for the eastern religious themes and general bizare moral relativism.
cvu777

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

542 of 558 people found the following review helpful By James L. Grubb on January 3, 2000
Format: Hardcover
The book sets the premise that you never learn to deal with money successfully until you overcome your fear of money...of not having enough, and fear of taking action with your money. It's about how to make money work for you so you have more than enough because you learn to devote energy, time, and understanding, to money. The three ways of getting money in this world: (1) Work for it (2) inherit it (3) invest the money you save (the most powerful, respectful way to get money there is).
Here are the 9 steps to financial freedom: 1. Step back in time to see how your feelings about money can be traced to your past. We all have "money messages" passed down from generation to generation. 2. Face your money fears and create new, positive truths. 3. Be honest with yourself. Ouit using plastic cards for money. They are addictive and destructive as drugs, giving you a quick fix by satisfying temporary desires. 4. Be responsible to those you love. Establish life insurance, wills, power of attorney, estate planning, etc. 5. Be respectful of yourself and your money. If you do what needs to be done with money, you will attract money to you. 6. You and your money must keep good company. Credit cards are never good company. Get out of debt. Respect yourself and your money by making every penny work for you. 7. Trust yourself more than you trust others. Find the "little voice" inside you; listen to what it has to say. 8. Be open to receive all you are meant to receive. When you are in control of your money and have enough to be generous, money flows to you. 9. Understand the ebb and flow of the money cycle. Money has natural cycles as it ebbs and flows through your life.
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167 of 174 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 16, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Just finished reading this...and then immediately went into work and changed my 401(k) contribution to the maximum. Also am looking for a money market account and will begin managing my own IRA stuff...now that I feel more comfortable doing it. Plan to lend the book to friends, and called my parents to tell them to get a copy and start getting things in order...such as getting a trust instead of a will, getting LTC insurance, etc. I liked her straightforward writing style; she has a knack for explaining the "mysterious" world of investing and finance in a way you can quickly and easily understand. She makes you feel more confident...that you can indeed manage your money. In today's often confusing world, it was very helpful to hear that you can trust your intuition and you don't have to "fall prey" to financial advisors. Also, from personal experience, I know that her advice about "good brings good" and "respect of money will bring you more money" is true. My husband got in a serious accident a year ago and at the time we were in a bad bad financial position--no emergency funds, high credit card debt, prospects of little or no income. This "kick in the pants" helped me to take control of my money and now a year later our credit cards are paid off, we have 4 months of bills in the bank, and I am maxing out my 401(k). Suze Orman's book came to me just when I was ready for the next step, and I am putting it to good use. I highly recommend!!!
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110 of 114 people found the following review helpful By Theresa & Mike Brennan on March 4, 2000
Format: Hardcover
A very successul friend once told me that you can live off your income but you can't get wealthy off you income, you only get wealthy by investing and properly managing yourmoney.This book will kickstart you and help make you money smart.I also suggest Financial Self Defense and More Wealth without Risk to add more financial strategies to your arsenal.All three books are must reading.
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61 of 62 people found the following review helpful By Michael Mendenhall on May 27, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This was overall a pretty good book. A lot of the information I've heard before, but I like the author's writing style.
The advice is pretty standard: Pay off your credit cards, pay down your mortgage, invest for the long term. What I liked about this book is that it's readable. The examples make sense. It's easy to say "pay off your credit cards" but she shows in black and white just how much money credit cards are costing you. Her comparison of a 30 year mortgage to a 15 year mortgage was quite compelling. I had no idea how much difference paying a little extra each month toward a mortgage makes. It's a lot more than I thought.
Can you become financially free reading this book? Yes, you can. But you have to follow the steps. You have to do it. Don't read this book and then put it away thinking it was great and wouldn't it be nice if I changed my lifestyle and habits. Do it. I have, and I can say it's worth it.
I'm giving this book 4 stars. I'm not giving it 5 because I've read much of the information elsewhere. This isn't the first financial book ever written. I give it a high rating because it's very readable. It's not dull at all. I felt like the author was talking to me like a human being. It's worth buying. I highly recommend it. I also highly recommend "Rich Dad Poor Dad" by Robert Kiyosaki. His book has some similar concepts, but I found it even more readable. His book is about acquiring income producing assets as opposed to just paying down debt and acquiring paper assets. Buy both books.
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