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The Stingray Shuffle Hardcover – February 4, 2003


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow; 1st edition (February 4, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060520450
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060520458
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.3 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (69 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,094,881 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In the frenetic tradition of the film It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (1963), train buff and maniacal killer Serge A. Storms and his druggie pal, Lenny, chase a briefcase containing $5 million, which surfaced in Florida Roadkill (1999), in Dorsey's fifth over-the-top crime novel. Others trailing it include Russian hoodlums posing as Latinos, in the employ of the incompetent head of the world's only bankrupt drug cartel. The discombobulated mobsters end up on the NY-Miami supertrain, the Stingray Shuffle. The briefcase eventually lands in deserving hands-but will it remain there? The hurtling plot often gets sidetracked by Dorsey's self-indulgent set pieces and history lessons, leaving the reader out of breath, rather than breathless. Lenny says, "All my friends up north keep asking me, does the freak show ever take a break down there?" Not in Dorsey's Florida.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

In his latest bizarre concoction, Dorsey picks up--sort of--various plot strands from his earlier books, including Florida Roadkill (1999), Hammerhead Ranch Motel (2000), and Orange Crush (2001). There's still the matter, you see, of the briefcase full of cash, and still unresolved are the stories of Serge Storms, the serial killer and history buff; Johnny Vegas, the startlingly handsome virgin; Jethro Maddox, the Hemingway look-alike; and Paul, the Passive-Aggressive Private Eye. Fans of Dorsey's magnificently off-kilter adventures will be thrilled to rejoin these characters and to meet a host of new ones, including Mr. Granda, the leader of a down-and-out drug cartel who is looking to buy a submarine, and Ralph Krunkleton, one of America's very worst novelists, whose novel The Stingray Shuffle features prominently in the goings-on. A brilliantly constructed romp that is part thriller, part farce, and entirely, gloriously, deliriously wacky. David Pitt
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

Tim Dorsey was a reporter and editor for the Tampa Tribune from 1987 to 1999 and is the author of ten previous novels: Florida Roadkill, Hammerhead Ranch Motel, Orange Crush, Triggerfish Twist, The Stingray Shuffle, Cadillac Beach, Torpedo Juice, The Big Bamboo, Hurricane Punch, and Atomic Lobster. He lives in Tampa, Florida.

Customer Reviews

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  • "Writing" 10
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By David W. Straight on February 7, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Having just finished Shuffle (after reading Triggerfish Twist),
and now rereading Florida Roadkill, I can say that Dorsey is
better than Hiaasen's weaker novels, but still is a ways from
Hiaasen's best work (Tourist Season, Skin Tight). With Hiaasen's
best work, the characters and events from each novel stick in
mind for years. With Hiaasen's second-tier work, the characters
and events tend to blur together, so at this point I remember
very little about what went on in, say, Sick Puppy. Tim Dorsey's
work comes closer to this latter situation: I can remember some
good bits and pieces, but there's a lot of blurring, even with
Stingray Shuffle, which I just finished last night. That doesn't
bode well.
Like Hiaasen's work, Tim Dorsey's novels are entertaining. filled
with a dark humor and scathing views of some of the less pleasant
aspects of Florida. Dorsey is primarily the Tampa area, in
contrast to Hiaasen's Miami. Both writers have very sharp
and witty episodes with politicians, tourists, businesses that
cater to tourists, the drug-trade side of the state, etc.
Hiaasen's hero-types tend to be reluctant about killing:
Dorsey's Serge Storms (featured in all the novels so far) is an
enthusiast, usually killing in bizarre ways--entertaining in
small quantities, but not quite as appetizing when done several
times in each book. Dorsey is also fond (to the point of
getting a bit tiresome at times) of having Serge Storms digress
at length on historical and cultural details and minutae.
In Stingray Shuffle, he also has some other detail freaks
expounding in the same fashion as Storms--which doesn't help the
novel.
Still and all, it's an entertaining novel, worth reading.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By lazza on March 27, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
'The Stingray Shuffle' by Tim Dorsey is really more of a series of comedy skits than a novel. The so-called plot involves a madcap chase of briefcase containing $5 million in cash. While there are a few gratuitous murders this is hardly be called a crime story. Yet like Carl Hiaasen novels 'The Stingray Shuffle' contains plenty of Florida-isms; locals like me will love the historical references to Henry Flagler, the pioneering railroads of a century ago, etc. Too bad Tim Dorsey doesn't seem to have the satiric wit of Hiaasen. His humour is very childish in comparison.
Bottom line: a very silly yet often funny book. Passable.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Susan Williams on May 7, 2003
Format: Hardcover
To anyone who thinks the description of laughter as "side-splitting" is an exageration, I have only one response: Read chapter 3 of The Stingray Shuffle. (Actually, read the entire book.) I was literally in tears, laughing uncontrollably, trying not to wake up my sleeping family as I read late into the night of the antics on the minature golf course/driving range, including the true goal of hitting a bucket of balls and the misadventures of Johnny Vegas, the Accidental Virgin. Tim Dorsey has written a series of zany adventures set in the ripe-for-satire Florida scene, further honing his literary skills with each ensuing book. I thought it would be hard to top the comic absurdity of his last effort, Triggerfish Twist, but this entry delivers the early promise so evident from the beginning. Read it and meet (or meet again, if you are already a fan) Serge A. Storms, the bad guy you just have to love. Find out what happens to the briefcase with $5 millon, careen all over Florida from the Keys to Tampa, West Palm Beach, Fort Lauderdale and points beyond all the way to NY City. Enjoy the forgotten pleasure of true belly laughs....but be prepared for the aching side effects of laughing until it hurts.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By E.R. on January 25, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This whole series of books by Tim Dorsey can be described as a twisted and funny study on the dark side in all of human beings. Tim Dorsey manages to take everyday situations and make them incredibly funny. Based in Florida, the series follows the twisted life of Serge Storms (one of the best characters ever created) and all his sick, violent and disturbed adventures. Of course, along the way you will get to meet every kind of character you can imagine.

The interesting thing about this series is that behind all the funny stories, there are tons of social and political criticisms. I have read all the books in the series, and each one keeps getting better. If you are a fan of Quentin Tarantino movies, or South Park cartoons, you will love these books. A must buy.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A. M. Sulkin on April 7, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Picking up plotlines from each of Dorsey's previous books, the Stingray Shuffle follows the continuing adventures of Serge A. Storms and his pursuit of five million dollars he originally conned from a crooked insurance company in the first book of the series several years ago, Florida Roadkill. Tim Dorsey writes Serge A. Storms as a likeable pyschopathic serial killer. Charming one minute, insane killer the next. His main obession in the new book are trains, and the reader will learn a lot of archaic information about the topic while Storms pontificates every once in a while about the topic.
The Stingray Shuffle brings back several of the whacky characters from earlier books, such as Johnny Vegas, provides an explanation for Serge's amnesia in the third novel Orange Crush, while continuing the plotline from the ending of the Hammerhead Ranch Motel book. The new book features many new characters who drop in and out of the plot, including more than a few who die a tragic, but funny, death. Dorsey folds the book into itself by including a subplot about a book called "The Stingray Shuffle" with a similar plot as the real book itself. It becomes hard to know when you are reading about something in the "real" book as opposed to the "ficticious" book, both with the same name. As the plot moves from Florida to New York City, and back to Florida, most of the living characters collide on an Amtrak train ride where several of the loosely connected plotlines reach their climax.
Anyone interested in spending a few hours reading and laughing out loud should grab this book.
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