The Stream & the Sapphire: Selected Poems on Religious Th... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $13.95
  • Save: $2.40 (17%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 18 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Open Books
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Open Books is a non-profit literacy organization and all proceeds go towards funding literacy programs.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Stream & the Sapphire: Selected Poems on Religious Themes (New Directions Paperbook) Paperback – May 17, 1997


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.55
$7.49 $6.50
Year-End%20Deals%20in%20Books


Frequently Bought Together

The Stream & the Sapphire: Selected Poems on Religious Themes (New Directions Paperbook) + This Great Unknowing + Selected Poems
Price for all three: $34.69

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Year-End Kindle Daily Deals
Load your library with great books for $2.99 or less each, today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: New Directions Paperbook (Book 844)
  • Paperback: 88 pages
  • Publisher: New Directions (May 17, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0811213544
  • ISBN-13: 978-0811213547
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #227,500 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Agnus Dei
Altars
Annunciation
Ascension
The Avowal
The Beginning Of Wisdom
Caedmon
A Calvary Path
Candlemas
Conversion Of Brother Lawrence
Dom Helder Camara At The Nuclear Test Site
Flickering Mind
A Heresy
The Holy One, Blessed Be He, Wanders Again
Human Being
I Learned That Her Name Was Proverb
Ikon: The Harrowing Of Hell
'in Whom We Live And Move And Have Our Being'
Of Being
On A Theme By Thomas Merton
On A Theme From Julian's Chapter Xx
On Belief In The Physical Resurrection Of Jesus
On The Mystery Of The Incarnation
On The Parables Of The Mustard Seed
Poetics Of Faith
Primary Wonder
Psalm Fragments (schnittke String Trio)
Salvator Mundi: Via Crucis
The Servant-girl At Emmaus (a Painting By Velazquez)
The Showings: Lady Julian Of Norwich, 1342-1416
St. Peter And The Angel
St. Thomas Didymus
Standoff
Suspended
The Tide
To Live In The Mercy Of God
Variation On A Theme By Rilke
What The Figtree Said
-- Table of Poems from Poem Finder® --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Denise Levertov (1923-1997) was a British born American poet. She wrote and published 20 books of poetry, criticism, translations. She also edited several anthologies. Among her many awards and honors, she received the Shelley Memorial Award, the Robert Frost Medal, the Lenore Marshall Prize, the Lannan Award, a grant from the National Institute of Arts and Letters, and a Guggenheim Fellowship.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Volkert Volkersz on January 29, 2005
Format: Paperback
This collection of "selected poems on religious themes" is not to be confused with religious poetry, or inspirational poetry. Here we have a renowned modern poet from the late 20th Century, who embraced the Christian faith late in life, interacting with spiritual sources that crossed her path while on her journey of faith.

Often one only gets out of a poem what one brings to it, at other times the poem speaks for itself. Both are the case here. Levertov develops a personal dialogue with various texts, personages and paintings, such as Thomas Merton, Julian of Norwich, the Mass for St. Thomas Didymus, Caedmon from Bede's "History of the English Church," Velazquez's "The Servant Girl at Emmaus," Brother Lawrence's "Practice of the Presence of God," "Hail, space for the uncontained God" (from the Orthodox Christian Akathist hymn), as well as numerous New Testament passages.

Some of these poems presuppose at least a nodding acquaintance with the original source. Others, such as those dealing with Christ's suffering on the cross, will be more accessible, since most of our culture still retains an awareness of the life of Christ.

While I struggled through some of these works, knowing that if I took the time I could get much more out of them, others demanded to be read a second and third time immediately.

Such was the case with "Annunciation," which draws on the Gospel account of when the angel Gabriel announces to Mary that she is to bear the Son of God: "But we are told of meek obedience. No one mentions/ courage./ The engendering Spirit/did not enter her without consent./ God waited./ She was free/ to accept or to refuse, choice/ integral to humanness."

Many still believe that modern poetry and the Christian faith don't mix. Here is proof otherwise.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 13, 1999
Format: Paperback
The need for simple groupings of poems into thematic clusters may be too convenient and decpetive of the complexities of the poems themselves. But with Levertov, as with others, there is such a compelling predeliction towards specific themes and subjects that to do so can be useful.Here we have her major religious poems in a separate volume, just as there has been a volume of her poems on nature and a deserved volume of her political poems (if one hasn't been published already). These poems do chart Levertov's progressive understanding and acceptance of Christianity, but at their best they do something else. Their focus is often on natural scenes which have a humbling effect. The level sought isn't always that of the often over-mystified religious ceremony, though there's plenty of mystery to the poems. In "The Avowel" this effect is achieved through analogy, the submissive posture of lying on one's back hearkening not only a religious submission but one which the speaker is reminded of by the natural world. "As swimmers dare/ to lie face to the sky/ and water bears them,/ as hawks rest upon air/ and air sustains them,/ so would I learn to attain/ freefall, and float/ into Creator Spirit's deep embrace,/ knowing no effort earns/ that all-surrounding grace."
The "free-falling" that occurs is much like that effect of flight in George Herbert's concrete poem "Easter Wings," which takes the shape of a bird. Here the use of a center alignment (which is hard for me to approximate) gives the impression of both the "deep embrace" and the fall, each line arrising not from a speakerly margin but from a need more like song.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 34 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 27, 1997
Format: Paperback
This set of books frighten me. Both are powerful and wonderful and deserve
your immediate and lasting attention. The poems are not new, they are a
themed selection. Interestingly enough placed in seperate but equal volumes.

The Stream and the Sapphire is a selection of poems that elucidate the
growth of Denise as a Christian. And an exciting growth it is. My favorite
of the moment are words I use as prayer: "How can I focus my flickering,
perceive at the fountain's heart the sapphire I know is there?"

The Life Around Us is subtitled "selected poems on nature". In "A Reward",
we live a harried day with the narrator and watch with her as "the heron,
unseen for weeks, came flying widewinged toward me."

What is probably a marketing tool, a most wise one by the publisher, is
what scares me about these two volumes. In theme, the power of God is told
in lush detail in both volumes. The heron in the nature selection is the
holy spirit of the religious selection, and in our natural state both can
and will be the same. Those brief moments of recognition of something
outside ourselves.

So with these two volumes to recommend, why should I be trepiditious? The
marketing folks know us so well, and as poets we cannot overcome the
marketing department. "Christians" are right winged slobs that grow fat and
salute the flag and make fools of themselves on TV. They have absolutely no
regard for nature because they are Republicans bound and determined to
destroy the rainforest.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?