The Strength of the Wolf and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.95
  • Save: $1.79 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Tuesday, April 22? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Gently Used Book, Clean Pages, No Markings, Tight Binding, Minor Wear, Ships Now
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

The Strength of the Wolf: The Secret History of America's War on Drugs Paperback


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$16.16
$9.28 $3.99 $17.95

Frequently Bought Together

The Strength of the Wolf: The Secret History of America's War on Drugs + The Strength of the Pack: The Personalities, Politics and Espionage Intrigues that Shaped the DEA + The Phoenix Program
Price for all three: $58.26

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 554 pages
  • Publisher: Verso; First Paperback Edition edition (October 17, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1844675645
  • ISBN-13: 978-1844675647
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.1 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #923,050 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Before the Drug Enforcement Administration was created in 1973, before the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs was founded in 1968, the Federal Bureau of Narcotics (FBN) served as the country’s primary drug law enforcement agency. In this thoroughly researched history, Valentine (The Phoenix Program; The Hotel Tacloban, etc.) offers an in-depth look at the FBN’s obscure organization and its various activities, which lasted from 1930 until the end of the ‘60s. Valentine writes extensively about Harry J. Anslinger, the commissioner whose "personality, policies and appointments" defined the agency and the government’s war on drugs for more than 30 years. He describes how FBN officers were trained to "make arrests, gather evidence for presentation in court, test and handle seized narcotics, tail suspects without being seen, and rule their informants with an iron fist." Drawing upon interviews with former agents and federal officers (such as Howard Chappell, George Gaffney and Col. Tully Acampora), Valentine also provides firsthand accounts of bureau operations both at home and abroad, and of business relationships fostered among FBN ranks. Despite the volume’s ambitious premise and Valentine’s hard work, however, this lengthy history will probably fail to engross most casual readers since its material proves dense and, occasionally, difficult. But for political historians and those already interested in the history of the war on drugs, Valentine’s unearthing of rare primary sources should prove invaluable. 16 pages of b&w photos
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

“Valentine’s book is an important and necessary story that reads like a coherent speed freak’s monologue.”—Counterpunch

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
1
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 10 customer reviews
Very well documented.
steve banyai
They eventually corrupted the entire Italian government and even the Vatican bank!
Joseph Balletti
Very good book but you need some insight into the organization.
Flyfisherman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By D. G Wood on July 28, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Based on exhaustive research and interviews, this detailed and extensively footnoted history of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics is both a fine reference work for scholars, and an eye-opening, exciting narrative for the general reader. The book itself is the highest quality, made to last for generations, and includes a section of rare photographs, and an appendix consisting of a rogue's gallery from the FBN's files. The FBN, headed by Harry J. Anslinger, was the precursor agency to today's DEA. The War on Drugs that has been waged for years now, with a price is no object mentality, is now being reconsidered by more and more people as either an ill-considered mistake, or perhaps even as a Big Government/Big Brother monkey on the public's fiscal back. The War has surely not stopped the supply of drugs, and if you have ever thought that it was never intended to, but wondered why that was so, The Strength of The Wolf, will provide some answers. There are many books about drug enforcement (or lack thereof) in the recent past, but this work is unique in that it looks at what might be called the dawn of drug enforcement.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By R. C. O'Brien on March 19, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Given how much money this country spends to fight drug dealers and to lock up drug dealers & users both, I am amazed how little I hear people question the War on Drugs.

This book provides the historical framework critical to understand this, with the War on Drugs beginning as an attempt to provide what equates to trade protection to the pharmaceutical companies (who competed with the real thing of the day, opium/heroin), and how later racism led to marijuana users being targeted as well (Black Americans in Harlem and Latinos in the SW and California), and of course the violence fueled by the cocaine/crack trade made it a national buzzword.

It is a crime that this assault on our own citizens continues today - one would think that after the dismal failure of Prohibition that we would have learned our lesson.

Hopefully this book can start raising a consciousness to question it, at the very least more public debate (without the hysteria) is long overdue.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Matthew C. Kenny on October 15, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is packed with great information. It is, however, very sloppy. As someone familiar with Kennedy assassination literature, the chapter referring to the FBN's various connections to the Big Hit is particularly telling (there is a crazy part on CIA Agent Desmond Fitzgerald that is loaded with implication and woefully inadequate in context that was just irresponsible). Valentine hops around incoherently and speculatively, overshadowing some of the great stories he's found. That said, I would say those great stories are worth it. I've read it twice, developed a deep skepticism and still enjoyed the book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By H. Campbell on June 30, 2011
Format: Paperback
Valentine promises to blow the lid on the involvement of the CIA and FBI in coddling and protecting organized crime mobsters in the drug biz. But unfortunately the book is mostly about the internal politics and personal pecadilloes of the FBN agents, with just a hint of the CIA complicity in the drug business. Of course, the book is about the Federal Bureau of Narcotics, but Valentine's style annoys more than it informs; he repeats himself more than a few times and offers a lot of admitted speculation about motives and unexplained events. Even the dissolution of the FBN, supposedly because the agents were meddling too much in the CIAS's clandestine mob ties, is weakly handled. All in all, I'd suggest passing on this one if you're looking for the dirt on America's biggest drug peddler, the Cocaine Importation Agency.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By steve banyai on January 30, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I Highly recommend this book. Very clear evidence of why drugs are everywhere. 'NATIONAL SECURITY' trumps war on drugs- The CIA wins every time. Goes into great detail about the US GOV working with the Mafia, POPPY Bush, BAY OF PIGS CUBANS, JFK, RFK, CRACK COCAINE, IMPORTING HEROINE, Using our troops as a market. Very well documented. I have given copies to many friends.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search
ARRAY(0xa5ac6864)