The Strongman and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $28.00
  • Save: $6.83 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Tuesday, April 22? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Used book in very good condition THANKS FOR YOUR BUSINESS
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $2.00
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Strongman: Vladimir Putin and the Struggle for Russia Hardcover


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$21.17
$13.97 $7.50

Frequently Bought Together

The Strongman: Vladimir Putin and the Struggle for Russia + First Person: An Astonishingly Frank Self-Portrait by Russia's President
Price for both: $35.57

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: I. B. Tauris (February 28, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1780760167
  • ISBN-13: 978-1780760162
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.6 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #166,634 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A solid foreign correspondent narrative of Putin’s behavior" - Bill Keller, The New York Times

"The considerable value of this book lies in his painstaking and empathetic effort to understand how Mr.. Putin came to power, why many Russians still support him today, and how the West's approach to Russia has helped to shape his rule." – The Wall Street Journal

"A serious book that portrays a Russian administration at sea in a world most of its officials did not comprehend. Putin himself emerges as a more complex character than the epithet "strongman" would suggest…Every chapter of this book is worth reading.” – The Independent (UK)

“[A] lively and absorbing study of the Putin years.” - The Guardian (UK)

"As a former adviser to the Kremlin in 2006-09, working for the Brussels based consultancy GPlus, Roxburgh had an excellent vantage point, and here he offers a stellar cast of sources, drawn from those closest to Putin and Western leaders. Their accounts make this is a valuable book." - European Voice

"Roxburgh is a talented journalist and writer...a useful history of the Putin era....with views from Russian politicians, and some of the key players from the world of international politics, it is a book firmly rooted in fact and analysis. This means that Roxburgh’s approach is refreshingly free from some of the usual polemic, and he is to be congratulated for giving credit where credit is due and for underlining Putin’s role in stabilising Russia after the free-fall of the Yeltsin years." - Good Book Guide

About the Author

Angus Roxburgh is one of Britain’s most distinguished foreign correspondents. An author and renowned journalist, he was the Sunday Times Moscow Correspondent in the 1980s until he was expelled from the Soviet Union in a tit-for-tat espionage row. He returned in the 1990s and was the BBC’s Moscow correspondent during the Yeltsin years. Subsequently, he worked as an advisor and speechwriter for Putin’s communications team, a role which gave him unrivalled access to the Kremlin’s inner circle.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
9
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 15 customer reviews
This book is very well written and informative.
Virginia M Byers
It was very surprising to "digest" the information contained in this book especially as the author is a mainstream western journalist.
H. Williams
The author shows a true understanding of Russian politics and government; especially of that concerning Putin.
Eric Wilson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 17 people found the following review helpful By H. Williams on May 7, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I must say that that this book was a well researched , balanced and ground breaking study of Putin as a Russian leader. It was very surprising to "digest" the information contained in this book especially as the author is a mainstream western journalist. Whilst there is criticism of Putin, the author instead of needlessly demonizing him like other western analysts and journalists, provides a lot of perspective in Putin's upbringing and KGB training as well as an explanation of Russia's experience in the 1990s to show that Russia was not going to become a democracy overnight. He provides criticism of western policies toward Russia and his style of doing so is shocking , well written, groundbreaking and candid. Thus phrases like "what the west missed in Yeltsin was a leader who was pliant" are a good way of phrasing an accurate view. He also provides interviews with key insiders that provide a lot of insight into events concerning Russia, NATO ,the west and the globe over the last 20 years. We hear from Dmitry Peskov how Khodorkovsky was plotting to take over the Kremlin by buying off the duma and we hear from Sergei Markov about the Kremlin's effort to fix the election in Ukraine in 2004 by stating a view that was absurd and conspiratorial in nature (the west was plotting to put an anti Russian candidate to rule Ukraine).Most importantly of all, we hear from Nicholas Burns , one of the architects of NATO expansion that NATO expansion was targeted at Russia. He basically says that he knew Russia would try to become strong and dominate Europe again and that they had to protect Eastern Europe.For me, this was a shocking revelation and it is astonsihing to see this view making it into a work by a mainstream western journalist.

That being said, the flaw of this book is that Mr.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Eric Wilson on January 22, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The author shows a true understanding of Russian politics and government; especially of that concerning Putin. He offers his beliefs on why US-Russian relations have failed. A must read for those interested in Russian affairs.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By R. Land on October 26, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I found this book very informative, giving a long range perspective on Russia and it President. The author is fair to both Putin and the West, and shows errors and miscalculations on both parts, and leaving the reader with the feeling that things could have been so much different ... and better. There was a window of opportunity to truly engage the former Soviet Union and improve relations, but a failure to understand the history of the Russian people and assuming that they would embrace democracy as anyone does in the West proved fatal. Rebuffed and somewhat dismissed, Putin turned to what he knew ... autocratic power ... turning what might have been a budding democracy into a sham democracy that hides a totalitarian regime. It is hard to review without going into details, so I will recommend this book to anyone interested in post-Soviet Russia and its 'strongman' President, Vladimir Putin.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By John Martin on February 22, 2013
Format: Hardcover
This book generally covers the recent history of Russia from the end of the Soviet era and focuses primarily on the time in office of Vladimir Putin and Dmitry Medvedev. It provides a lot of information but is written from an outsider's (western) viewpoint. It is difficult to know what Putin is really like unless you are like George W. Bush and can see into their souls! Putin is contrasted to Medvedev and describe as more hard-line than the latter who is presented as more democratic. But who knows for sure? Medvedev is younger and more technology oriented and does not have the KGB mentality. What is most worrisome is that Russia under Putin has regressed away from a more open, democratic society toward an authoritarian state that is rift with corruption. Recently I spent three months in Moscow and it was clear to me that the mentality of Russians is different now from what it was when I was there in 1988-92 and the end of the Gorbachev years and beginning of the new Russia. Perhaps we have no right to expect Russia to be dramatically different from the time of the Tsars. Judging what is happening in the Kremlin is a fools game. No one can really know. Read the book and get some insights but do not expect to really understand Russia.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By John E. Drury VINE VOICE on July 15, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Of the two most recent Putin books, I bought this one based on its more favorable review in the Wall Street Journal describing Angus Roxburgh's "The Strongman" as the less histrionic assault on Russia's controversial leader. Roxburgh, an experienced journalist wholly familiar with Russia and its movers and shakers, "and numerous takers," makes up for his lack of passion with a convincing, journalistic and anecdotal drumbeat of facts and keen observations portraying Vladimir Putin as a clever, quixotic, frightening thug. Published in Britain, ahistorical in treatment, it lacks the historical scope and perspective of Timothy Colton's superb biography "Yeltsin." Putin's rise to power is not particularly informative; a deeper analysis how he was chosen in 1999 as the heir apparent to Yeltsin is needed. The last part of the book focuses on Dmitry Medvedev; Roxburgh convincingly contrasts the two leaders, and in a quiet way, makes Medvedev his preference for a more democratic and less corrupt Russia. While interesting, informative and contemporary, its annoyances are poor editing, missing articles ("the") and the use of some British street clichés.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa429851c)