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The Stump's On Fire And I'm Naked Paperback – November 15, 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Global Authors Publishers; First Edition edition (November 15, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0974216186
  • ISBN-13: 978-0974216188
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,871,045 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
50%
4 star
20%
3 star
0%
2 star
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1 star
30%
See all 10 customer reviews
The worst disappointment was the ending, which was supposed to be inspirational.
John Cook
As adults, though, most of us remember our childhoods as a time of innocence and exploration -- memories conveniently colored through the lens of time.
Harris Parkell
Vivid, explicitly written scenes denote this a book to be enjoyed by mature readers.
Myra S. Johnson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Elaine C. Mcever on January 31, 2006
Format: Paperback
This book was so incredibly honest I wanted to know more about those in the story and the author. It may have happened in the south but I have heard a similar story from the child of a migrant worker out west. Oakes' use of words and conversational style added mystery and kept me reading and wondering "how could anything good come out of this...?" Each character suggests another book. Foremost is his mother who is continuously seeking her own way out of a bad situation by affairs outside the home. His father drifts aimlessly through life by moving from field to field trying to get something out of the dirt beneath his feet. It would be interesting to know the thoughts of the other siblings. Each one takes a part of both parents with them into their lives as adults. At best it makes me wonder what parts of my life were taken from family members and what parts have been planted in my children. It is not a Sunday-go-to-meeting book nor is it knee slapping funny but it gives some laughs and helps you accept your past.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Harris Parkell on March 9, 2005
Format: Paperback
Childhood is that time of life when most children, through learning, experience upsets - such major events as seeing a sibling get a larger piece of dessert, not getting one's way and, of course, the occasional nightmares. As adults, though, most of us remember our childhoods as a time of innocence and exploration -- memories conveniently colored through the lens of time. As with most life experiences, however, people tend to forget both pain and unpleasantness, choosing instead to remember what was good and fun. Even the occasional memory of something not nice can cause an adult to laugh at its absurdity. But what happens to an adult if there were no good times to remember? What happens if a child grows up in such dire circumstances that each new school year brought with it unrelenting parental pressure to quit studies and work in the fields? What if each new month brought with it haunting fears -- both real and imagined - fears so bad that school, instead of home, became a sanctuary? And what if each night brought with it desperate attempts to breathe along with those special terrors that exist in a child's reality and can only be inflicted by those who are supposed to care for and nurture us? Such was the childhood of Don Oakes. In his book, The Stump's On Fire and I'm Naked, he describes a world that is unimaginable to most of us - from abject poverty and sexual abuses to the crazed fears of a mother as she, in her way, sought to keep her family safe and together while maintaining her own individuality. This book spans a lifetime. We see a young boy's determination to get an education in spite of ridicule heaped upon him because of the exploits of his family.Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Myra S. Johnson on October 28, 2004
Format: Paperback
As an avid reader of non-fiction, I found The Stumps On Fire and I'm Naked both inspiring and mesmerizing; a book written with such emotion that the reader lives right alongside Donald Oakes as he struggles through a childhood of unspeakable poverty and emotional trauma, wrapped in adult situations and dark secrets. Never losing faith that there was "something better out there" Oakes perseveres for education and eventually escapes his life of poverty as a sharecropper/moonshiner's son by joining the Air Force. On the other side of the world, Oakes realizes he carries emotional scars from his childhood as he searches for love and normalcy. While successfully `climbing the corporate ladder', supporting his family, and striving for the `American Dream', he is plagued by tormenting nightmares, anger, and illnesses; both physical and emotional. Oakes is finally forced to confront the demons of his childhood face to face in order to survive. A `must read', this poignant and inspirational autobiography is a result of years spent in therapy from which Oakes has successfully emerged. This book reads like a novel with its unforgettable characters and first-hand descriptions of life in the rural South. Vivid, explicitly written scenes denote this a book to be enjoyed by mature readers. Reviewed by Myra Johnson, author of God Feeds The Crows; A Labyrinth of Lees; Across The Miles; The Legacy of MDL Crawford; Grandma's Apron Strings; Mary's Children and contributing writer for Wetumpka Area Magazine, River Region Magazine and Lake Martin Living.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John Cook on June 20, 2009
Format: Paperback
From looking at the author's website, you'd think his book is the great work of our time. Instead the writing is passable but amatuerish. The only reason you keep reading is out of a bizarre fascination due to all the vulgar and perverted sexual content. In the end its just a cheap, dirty soap opera. And it is immediately clear that the author has a massive ego. The worst disappointment was the ending, which was supposed to be inspirational. Instead you get vague references to metaphysical principles. And the "mystery" is not ever solved. The long and the short of it is that no respectable person would want anyone to know they own this book (its that vulgar-dozens of F-words and endless sexual encounters etc.) and the storyline is dull.
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By Jan Elmy on October 26, 2009
Format: Paperback
Donald Oakes was very brave to expose aspects of his former self that more than likely much of humankind keeps hidden, even from themselves on some level. I know for myself that before reading his book I could not have been quite so forthcoming with aspects of the self I once was that I carried with me from an extremely dysfunctional childhood into my adult years, and seemingly, with a vengeance that was out of my control, and like him, to have catch up with me in adulthood, and learning from my fall, with the help of one good friend and one good therapist, that the buck could stop here. Much of his book I read with my mouth agape, and suddenly my story didn't seem so tragic after all. Mr. Oakes shows us that it is okay, and good, to forgive our parents, and ourselves for shame that was not of our own making, and that to look toward a Power greater than ourselves is a Mighty huge reward. I recommend his book to all adults of a dysfunctional childhood for it's ability to show us that in the end, it really doesn't matter, so long as we are able to pull ourselves up and take ownership of our own behavior and potential, versus those lacking and dysfunctional aspects of our parents.
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