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The Sum of All Fears (O.S.T.)

December 28, 2004 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:30
30
2
5:57
30
3
2:55
30
4
2:45
30
5
1:33
30
6
3:36
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2:34
30
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2:27
30
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2:12
30
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1:51
30
11
2:58
30
12
1:52
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2:51
30
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6:05
30
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2:01
30
16
3:34
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: June 4, 2002
  • Release Date: December 28, 2004
  • Label: Elektra Records
  • Copyright: 2002 Elektra Entertainment for the United States and WEA International Inc. for the world outside of the United States.Warner Music Group, An AOL Time Warner Co.. Allrights reserved. Unauthorized dup
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 48:41
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0011ZWOEI
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #90,090 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Brandon Cutro on December 19, 2002
Format: Audio CD
With Basil Poledouris and James Horner that did previous Tom Clancy films, Jerry Goldsmith steps in and delivers a great score to the latest film, The Sum of All Fears. The soundtrack starts and ends with a song written by Goldsmith (he wrote the music, which becomes the theme) called "If We Could Remember" which is performed by Yolanda Adams. This song should be nominated for an Academy Award because of its outstanding music and lyrics. The second track "The Mission" includes "If We Could Remember", this time performed by Shana Blake Hill, with a 2 note middle eastern theme thrown in. Goldsmith uses a chorus throughout several of the tracks in a Russian like manner to convey the setting of the film. "The Bomb" is a great track which features chorus, low brass, percussion, and synths. "That Went Well" features the choir and brass playing that haunting Russian theme that I talked about earlier. Really the only 2 action cues are found in "Clear the Stadium" and "Real Time" which represent the suspense styles Goldsmith used in Air Force One and possibly U.S. Marshals with sixteenth note string passages. "The Same Air" concludes the score with the "If We Could Remember" theme and that 2 note middle eastern theme. "If We Could Get Through This" is a decent song thrown in the middle of the score that should have been at the very beginning or very end so it doesn't get in the way of the score. The same thing can be said about "Nessun Dorma" which is a great piece performed by Bruce Sledge in an opera like fashion. Concluding the soundtrack is a reprise of "If We Could Remember". To sum it all up, this is a great soundtrack that shows Goldsmith at his best. I wish the 2 themes were used much more often than they were, which is why a 5 star rating is lacking. But, a great soundtrack and a must have.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By G M. Stathis on June 5, 2002
Format: Audio CD
Jerry Goldsmith's work is showcased in the soundtrack recording for "Sum of All Fears," both in terms of the orchestral score and vocal songs. It all works quite well, in the film and on the soundtrack, but with three tracks devoted to the same song, and another to a much less memorable addition, one might say enough. Actually, the main vocal is very good and is used in a different, quite sombre form (in Latin) to open the film (effectively, it should be noted), but it also appears as a "reprise" which might be one vocal too many...the other vocal is just that. As a dramatic score for a Tom Clancy thriller, Goldsmith seems very much at home and he produces one of his best main themes which appears in several forms (including two different renditions in the vocals). There are haunting uses of Middle Eastern idioms throughout the music on the album and they work. The opening music, "The Mission" is a masterful combination of dramatic score and the title song forming what could easily have been an oratorio for September 11, 2001, as the opening music for this film. One cannot fault Goldsmith for wanting to showcase a very good piece of music, but three versions of the same vocal is one too many. Overall, this is a very good effort with one absolute gem..."The Mission," which may become one of this great composer's more remembered achievements; for this cut alone, bravo, indeed!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Colin L. Aitken on February 6, 2007
Format: Audio CD
The opening track is great, however, I bought the cd in anticipation of hearing the rendition of the fourth verse of the Star Spangled Banner from the football game and it wasn't there at all. I have never heard the that piece of music performed so magnificently! But I guess this is a characteristic of "sound tracks"; some items in the movie soundtrack don't seem to make it to the soundtrack you buy from the store.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
One of the late, great Jerry Goldsmith's final scores was 'The Sum of All Fears', in which a young Jack Ryan tries desperately to stave off nuclear war after neo-Nazi terrorists detonate a low-yield nuclear bomb in a Baltimore, MD football stadium, killing thousands. The score, alternately ominous/chilling and very moving at times, suited the movie very well.

Having said that, there are some issues; the tracks are (mostly) out of chronological order which makes it a bit difficult to follow; there are also too many vocals on the CD - I would have preferred to have heard more of Goldsmith's score, especially the score for the attack on the carrier. Although I think some of this music was heard on 'Snap Count', it seemed to be missing most of it.

'The Mission', heard as the film opens, is one of the most stirring tracks of the score - this is heard as we see the Israeli plane take off, then see it attacked by a surface-to-air missile and destroyed before the pilot can take evasive action. 'Changes', an ominous theme, uses low strings & brass as we see neo-Nazi Dressler address a webcam broadcast while the bomb is smuggled into the football stadium, disguised in a cigarette machine. My personal favorite is, despite its short length, 'Clear the Stadium'; in this one, bellicose yet ominous low piano & kettledrum rolls signal a frightening realization to Bill Cabot - that the bomb is in their city! As he signals the Secret Service agents to get the President out, a panicked tone of violins & cellos takes over, followed by the distinct French Horn rendition of the main theme as the motorcade swiftly leaves the stadium.
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