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106 of 111 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Epic novel about war and remembrance
Short summary and review - no spoilers.

This novel jumps around in time and place - from 1930's Manchuria to 1980's New York and Italy. We start off in Korea in the early 1950's during the Korean War. We are introduced to one of the main characters in the book - a young girl we come to know as June, who is one of the many refugees who are fleeing their homes...
Published on February 17, 2010 by sb-lynn

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73 of 80 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Arms and a woman
In "The Surrendered," Chang-Rae Lee examines the effects of the Korean War on two survivors: a child, June, who loses her entire family in the flight of civilian refugees southward down the Korean peninsula, and, an American soldier, Hector Brennan, caught in the same retreat. Nearly starved, she follows him to safety, and then to a Korean orphanage, where Hector works...
Published on February 7, 2010 by M. Feldman


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106 of 111 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Epic novel about war and remembrance, February 17, 2010
By 
sb-lynn (Santa Barbara, California United States) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Surrendered (Hardcover)
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Short summary and review - no spoilers.

This novel jumps around in time and place - from 1930's Manchuria to 1980's New York and Italy. We start off in Korea in the early 1950's during the Korean War. We are introduced to one of the main characters in the book - a young girl we come to know as June, who is one of the many refugees who are fleeing their homes. She is only 11 years old, and seeking shelter, food and safety for her and her younger siblings.

This first chapter is just an extraordinary opening - and it is one of the most harrowing descriptions I've ever read of the refugee/wartime experience.

Other key characters include Hector, an American soldier who joins the army to get away from his small town after a tragic event involving his family. Hector is a wonderful character - he is a noble, decent man put in war time situations that could break anyone's spirit. We also meet Sylvie Tanner, the daughter of missionaries, who ends up in Korea just after the war taking care of Korean orphans with her husband. It is here that Sylvie meets up with Hector and June.

We know from the early chapters that take place in 1980s New York that June is trying to locate her her son and that she wants Hector to go with her. By going back and forth between time and place, we can see how early horrific wartime experiences changed their lives forever .

There is a tremendous amount of foreshadowing in this novel - in seemingly every chapter we are made aware of secrets and horrors from each character's past, and it is only at the end when we find out the whole story. In some ways this felt a bit manipulative, but not overly so and it did add to the book being a page-turner, especially towards the end. (And there is a good twist for people who like this sort of thing, and I do.)

This book is not for those who are squeamish about violence and tales of war. For anyone else, and for those looking for a big epic book that will transport you to several other (dark) times and places, this is for you.

Recommended.
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73 of 80 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Arms and a woman, February 7, 2010
This review is from: The Surrendered (Hardcover)
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In "The Surrendered," Chang-Rae Lee examines the effects of the Korean War on two survivors: a child, June, who loses her entire family in the flight of civilian refugees southward down the Korean peninsula, and, an American soldier, Hector Brennan, caught in the same retreat. Nearly starved, she follows him to safety, and then to a Korean orphanage, where Hector works as a handyman. Years later, their lives intersect once more, in the U.S., where Hector, who lives on the edge of down and out, still handles a mob and broom, and June, suffering from cancer, begins a journey to understand--if not solve--more than one mystery.

The scenes in the novel that are set during the war and afterward, at the orphanage, as well as a sub-plot set during the Japanese occupation of Manchuria, run like a vivid thread through "The Surrendered." Here, Lee conveys, in compelling detail, the cost of the war not only in lives but in emotional suffering. These scenes, taut and well plotted, are the best part of the novel.

The depiction of the adult lives of Hector and June is less successful, primarily because Lee utilizes long passages of interior consciousness that add little to the characterization of either one of them. After a while, I found my eye sliding over these. Even descriptive passages are sometimes too prolix, as if the narrator could not bear to leave out a single detail, however irrelevant. A sheet of dryer fabric softener, for example, smells of lilacs, and then of the memory of Hector's mother's lilacs. As the characters pass through Siena, the narrator offers a tourist's guidebook sidebar on the festival of the Palio. Details of illness, addiction or even drunkenness--retching, nausea, injections, the growth of a tumor, the look of someone's vomit, and so on--recur, to excess. The book, nearly 450 pages long, would have been better if it had been shorter.

The plot of "The Surrendered" is intricate and ambitious. Its action occurs on three continents, over a span of decades, as it moves from Korea to Ilion, classically-named Hector's classically-named upstate New York hometown. (Lee sings of the real Ilion, where Remington Arms made the town.) It ends in Italy, in Solferino, site of a monument to a bloody 19th century Italian battle. There are also parts of the novel set in in Fort Lee and in Manhattan. So much happens that at times the plot strains credulity: an automobile accident is just too convenient, a passport fraud too easy, an unlocked cottage too handy.

At the center of the novel is June, the mostly unloved Korean orphan who achieves little happiness in her adult life. She is a sympathetic character. Her unnaturally smooth palms, the outward sign of a terrible physical injury, suggest that the trauma of her childhood is only superficially healed. If you are interested in Korea, you will not want to miss this story, which traces the impact of war not just on soldiers, but on civilians like June. It would make interesting reading alongside David Halberstam's fine history of the Korean conflict, entitled "The Coldest Winter." In "The Surrendered," June has set out on a journey in order to achieve a necessary reconciliation. Does she find it? One can only think of the Korean War itself, which to this day has no peace treaty, only an uneasy armistice.
M. Feldman
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25 of 28 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Damaged Lives, March 12, 2010
This review is from: The Surrendered (Hardcover)
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Chang-Rae Lee has written an ambitious novel containing scenes of undeniable power. His ability to capture the collateral casualties of war was obvious from the first, and I found myself admiring both his writing and narrative technique, even as I was repelled by the grimness of the picture he was painting. But I could not fully warm to any of the characters. As the book went on, I found myself reading with growing impatience, as his skill at jumping around between time periods began to look like delaying tactics, making a long novel even longer without significantly deepening his character portrayal or developing his theme.

The setting of the novel ranges from China in 1934 to Italy in 1986, but the central events take place in an orphanage in Korea in 1953, where the lives of three people intersect. June is a young Korean girl who lost her parents and siblings during the flight from the advancing Communists in 1950. Hector is an American GI, a psychological casualty of the Korean War, now working as a handyman. And the lovely Sylvie, herself the daughter of missionaries, is the wife of the director of the mission orphanage. Both June and Hector become attracted to Sylvie, who has herself been traumatized by her experiences during the Japanese invasion of China in 1934. They are three damaged people trying in vain to find healing in one another.

Lee's handling of the back-stories is extraordinary. The opening sequence with June fleeing South is gripping; Hector's adolescence in upstate New York looking after his bar-brawling father is merely grungy, but his encounter with a young Korean prisoner is riveting; and Sylvie's violent introduction to love and betrayal is incandescent, far and away the strongest chapter in the book. Moving forward, the scenes in the mission, interspersed throughout the book, are generally well told, although it can be difficult to get a clear sense of the passage of time.

But it is in the after-story that Lee fails. The first flash-forward is intriguingly mysterious, but the facts soon emerge: June is dying of cancer and sells up her successful New York antiques business, heading for Italy to track down her son Nicholas, the fruit of her brief marriage of convenience to Hector. It soon becomes obvious that this later story is created solely as a framework to contain the flashbacks. Nicholas never gets fleshed out as a human being, and Lee is astoundingly cavalier in manipulating events to suit his purposes, introducing characters only to dismiss them on a whim, and stretching credulity to its limits. The book ends in the ossuary in Solferino, the 1859 Italian battlefield that is mentioned several times earlier in the novel, with the sole apparent purpose of having somewhere to end it.

In tracing the long-term effects of warfare, Chang-Rae Lee has a powerful theme. But it is difficult to maintain interest in damaged characters who, even through no fault of their own, are only half functioning as human beings. Sylvie is addicted to drugs; Hector is a compulsive drinker; June is so far gone in her sickness that her actions are unpredictable, and even in the orphanage it appears that her moral compass is damaged or missing. They are all half-people at best. Although we sympathize with their tragedy, and even discern glimmers of goodness among the psychic rubble, they make poor companions on a long journey to a place that is not very meaningful anyway.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Too Literary For Its Own Good, June 4, 2010
This review is from: The Surrendered (Hardcover)
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June Han was orphaned in the Korean War. She barely escapes becoming a casualty of the war when she meets Hector Brennan, who leads her to the orphanage where he currently works. Although she's saved, she is solitary and beligerant and is avoided by the other children. Hector, a former soldier, has witnessed and participated in more than enough war time atrocities, and he tries to lose himself through self-destruction. But he seems to be immortal, harming those around him instead of himself. When a missionary couple, the Tanners, arrive at the orphanage, both June and Hector find solace in the wife, Sylvie. Sylvie helps others, but she has her own dark secrets dragging her down. In the present day, June is suffering from stomach cancer and doesn't have long to live. She has one task to complete before she dies, and she needs Hector's help. Together, they must face their demons as they work toward their goal.

The story is interesting at times, especially when it focuses on the orphanage, but it's much too long. The pace is slow and the chapters long, and I had to force myself to stick with it. Lee has a nice writing style, but he often uses too much description, with sentences sometimes going for an entire paragraph. These long sentences are usually so complex that they become hard to understand. Also, though I liked the writing style in general, I felt it was inappropriate for the story. It's poetic and philosophical when the characters are just trying to survive, and it seems academic and removed. This is not a book for the weak of stomach; there are plenty of gory details. But I could tell right away that Lee himself hadn't actually experienced the things he writes about in this book. Also, some plot twists were just too unreal, especially an accident around half way through the book (though I was impressed by another, later twist).

I was ambivalent about the characters. I liked June as a child. She's independent and willful, and she thinks like I would imagine a girl in her situation would. I could relate to some of her thinking myself. But as an adult, her willfulness is less appealing. She acts childish, refusing to listen to reason and having to have things her way. She did get better once she met up with Hector, though. Hector was a pretty good character, though he was kind of stereotypical. I liked the association between him and the Greek hero Achilles. He's a gritty man who spends his days drinking and working menial jobs. But when he begins a relationship with a woman named Dora, things start to turn around for him. This was a bit of a problem for me, as Hector was starting to redeem himself before June came back into the picture. It kind of defeats the purpose of his facing the past with her. The relationship between the two is complex and touching, however, and I enjoyed their interactions. Sylvie was an interesting character, especially in her younger years. She, too, seemed to think as a real girl would, though she seemed to willing to act on sexual impulses for someone at her age and in her position (there was a lot of sex in the book overall, and though I think sexuality was a theme, this wasn't the only instance that seemed unrealistic). But her story was a good one. The relationship between her and June was heartfelt, and the relationships with her parents, husband, and othe figures were also interesting.

But all the characters have some kind of huge problem, even the minor ones. Most of them have dark pasts, and those who don't react dramatically to small things. I can believe that June and Hector have problems, but when everyone is damaged and drifting... well, I can only suspend my disbelief so far. Even June and Hector have an awful lot of bad things happen to them, aside from the things they suffer in the war. Also, the characters' feelings are often described in strange ways. I got the impression that Lee was trying to make their feelings seem unique and realistic, but it made them seem more ficitional than ever. They spend too much time trying to describe their feelings poetically to be believable.

I did enjoy the themes here, about the purpose of life and survival. I already know what I think about those things, but Lee raises more questions than he gives answers. That's always a good thing. I was also interested in some of the motifs, like how certain characters who seem unrelated are linked by an item. This occurred more than once, and I'm sure it was no accident. I also liked the symbol of Sylvie's book on a bloody battle in the Italian city of Solferino and of the church there. These things all seem to have deeper meanings, but the meanings seem to be complex.

"The Surrendered" certainly had its good parts. I enjoyed the parts about the orphanage and about Sylvie's past. It had good themes and some interesting characters. However, it's too long and slow, and too literary for its own good. It takes on a lofty tone that's not appropriate for its main theme of survival. Though the characters did think and behave realistically at times and some plot points were compelling, the book was just too overwrought. It's too self-aware of its status as literuature, making the story seem unrealistic and pretentious. Some authors have used this to their advantage by creating abstract novels, but it doesn't work with a book that's intended to be realistic.
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Magnificent prose gone a bit haywire, March 22, 2010
This review is from: The Surrendered (Hardcover)
(light spoilers)

Chang Rae Lee's power of prose has just grown and grown over the years and I had been eagerly awaiting a new novel from him ever since his "Aloft," which I thought was one of the most extraordinary books of that year. It is with great relief to me then that this novel contains some of the best writing Chang Rae Lee has ever produced. Some of the phrases literally sing off the pages and make the heart weep with longing and wistfulness in its imagery...moments that are just perfectly crystallized in words and structure. It is this reason that made me finish this book in just one day and wanting to re-read passages again to savor those well-crafted and ethereal sentences again.

It is comprised of a trail of beautifully written moments which certainly kept me chugging along until my next fix (the 3 haunting war set pieces for Hector, June and Sylvie are masterful, the simple dinner prepared by a woman in love and the effect it has on the man was a wonderful little moment, the luxurious and almost travelogue descriptions of Italy, the taste of food to a dying woman...etc etc...I can go on and on). Certain minor characters (Sylvie's parents, Benjamin, the latter-Dora, Min, to name a few) were wonderfully sketched and realized.

Sylvie was also a fully constructed and realized character--it didn't matter that you knew she was doomed--her character was so rich that the suspense lay in whether she found peace or if she were damned. Her struggle and war with herself was probably the most compelling aspect of the novel and she is a real creative achievement for Lee.

But the first of 2 big flaws to this novel were the 2 central characters of Hector and June. Both characters, June moreso than Hector, have moments of sheer unlikeability. They are both frozen in time and unable to move forward because of their individual tragedies and the shared tragedy which I suppose, makes them the eventualeponymous Surrendered. June has moments where her motivations of certain actions, especially later in her life, are somewhat unclear. I get it--she is "surrendering" after a lifetime of fighting defeat. But it would have benefitted her character a greatly if Lee could have filled in just a few more of the gaps. With Hector, the man who was born to be a hero but who could not fulfill his birthright's destiny, it is almost too much pathos and weakness. His continually broken character veers into the maudlin and the pathetic which makes him into merely a sad sack nurse in the latter parts of the novel where his big moment of breakthrough is defined as putting his beer down. I imagine this is intentional from Lee, but at times, I just wanted to move past these two characters to mine the pages for more prosaic gems or hear more about the past.

The second big flaw are the plot devices Lee chooses to move the events along. Examples:
- the mostly-angelic lot of orphans who I think in reality would all be a little more like the damaged and antisocial June and a little less like bratty moppets.
- the Nicholas WTF moment
- the very quick transformation of Dora from blowsy bar floozy to self-help book reading housefrau
- the Dora/Cline WTF moment
- the rush to the end (I was really surprised by how rushed the last scenes in the orphanage seemed...maybe that's just me)
- the NJ gambling subplot which I thought added nothing to the novel (this includes Hector's buddy Jung and the old man)
- the repetition of nausea and rot from June...it became just a bit too many times and felt heavy handed
- the fact that June and Hector had a son---it is extremely vague as to why June wanted to at all

These things, while having again beautifully observed and written passages, just seemed either excessive plot points or not fleshed out motivations.

In closing---I know that despite the 3-star review, I have to really recommend this book as a wonderful read. It WILL move you and the prose is something to marvel at. However, this is absolutely a novel which has some deep narrative flaws and my hope is that Mr. Lee's future novels (which I breathlessly await) are better structured plot wise and are more prudently edited.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful language and engrossing plot, May 4, 2010
By 
Trish D'imperio (Oneonta, New York USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Surrendered (Hardcover)
This amazing novel is about three people who meet at an orphanage in Korea right after the war there. These three characters could not be more different, but each of their stories is wonderful. June is an orphan who has lost her family in the war. Hector is an American soldier who decides after the war to stay in Korea and work in the orphange, and Sylvie is a missionary wife whose love Hector and June compete for. The book goes back and forth from their childhoods to their time at the orphanage and afterward. The bulk of the novel takes places in the 80s, when June, who is dying, takes Hector to Europe in attempt to find her estranged son.

The book contains some extremely descriptive and intense depictions of the horrors of war (rape, torture, etc.), so pass on this novel if you can't handle violence.

If you're looking for a really engrossing read, give this one a try. The language is incredibly beautiful and poetic, and the characters' stories are truly riveting.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Just About Too Much to Bear (spoiler alert as well), April 5, 2010
By 
J. L. Rubenking (Cleveland, OH USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Surrendered (Hardcover)
This is a deeply, profoundly depressing book. The characters are all, as one character says late in the novel, "a sack of broken things." I thought that sticking it out to the end would bring some comfort, some positive resolution; but be warned, it's not here.

June Han is dying and sets out to re-connect with the man who saved her life in war-time Korea, and bring him with her on her last journey, to find her son. Hector Brennan, the former soldier and life-saver, finds his solace in a go-nowhere job and the arms of a kind woman who is a fixture at the local bar they both frequent. If Hector, who is very unwilling, joins June on her quest, they will both have to deal with long-buried ghosts, especially their time in Korea with the missionary's wife, Sylvie, they both loved.

Much of the book is set in Korea, and involves tragedy on a war atrocity level. Hard to take, hard to read. The backstory of the missionary's wife is also horrifying and is told in bleak detail. It's a miracle of sorts that June survives long enough to be taken to the missionary orphanage by Hector. We know at the beginning of the book that she did make it out, that she married and had a successful business and outlived her husband, but that's small comfort in the bigger scheme of this story. June is broken, Sylvie is broken, and Hector becomes broken. As the story is brought out in slowly building segments, it's obvious that the train wreck is coming, but hard to look away.

As a reader, I almost put the book down halfway, so unhappy was I with its relentless tone. But I held out hope that there would be some relief in the end, some reclamation of gentleness and humanity. Chang-Rae Lee writes so very well, but I wonder if this examination of wrecked and wretched individuals is good for me or anyone else. Provocative, yes. Is that all the author wanted?
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Literature at its Best, March 20, 2010
This review is from: The Surrendered (Hardcover)
Lee's superlative writing makes this tragic novel about the profound and inescapable effects of war a must-read for fans of great literature. The story is revealed through masterfully crafted flashbacks to the events that shaped the lives of the three main characters. June Han's life is ruled by her struggle for survival that began with the horrific loss of her entire family during the Korean War. Haunted by guilt over his father's death, American Hector Brennan enlists in the Korean War, unwittingly setting his life on a never-ending path of self-loathing and destruction. Never able to measure up to the ideals set by her missionary parents, Sylvie Tanner is doomed to a life of failure following their murder by Japanese soldiers in Manchuria. Unable to escape the horror and devastation of the past, all three spend their lives searching for redemption that will never come. Lee's haunting, lyrical prose unerringly conveys the tormented thoughts and feelings of the characters. The Surrendered is a poignant novel that will leave you unsettled, yet yearning for more.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars La Blanche Traversee, August 26, 2010
This review is from: The Surrendered (Hardcover)
In "Flood", the 1999 composition by avant garde composer Jocelyn Pook wrote "I am the white crossing; which touches without shadows". It makes no sense, but its a lovely song, especially sung in French by Kelsey Michael. Chang-Rae Lee's epic "The Surrendered" recounts the tale of a former American Army soldier's entanglement in the lives and affairs of missionary wife and a young Korean War refugee as told decades after the event. It vaguely reminds me of "La Blanche Traversee", as the book is an excellent (sometimes lovely) example of the writer's craft (as might be expected from a faculty member of the Princeton University Creative Writing Department). But somehow, despite the cleverly constructed plot, vivid writing style and "timeless" theme, it fails to be emotionally engaging, unlike the song. While it is intellectually sophisticated no doubt, it is emotionally uninvolving, detached and occasionally sterile.

Whilst in Korea (circa 1950), Hector a combat veteran who later transfers to Graves Registration, encounters June, an adolescent girl who is fleeing southward from the battlefront. June has already lost her parents and one brother and, during the course of a train ride, loses her two younger siblings whom she was contemplating ditching, anyhow. Naturally, psychological trauma has left an indelible implant on June who, after arriving at an American missionary orphanage operated by the idealistic Ames Tanner and his improbably narcotics-addicted wife, engages in various off-putting behaviors which culminate in a gruesome escapade (featuring a purifying immolation, but otherwise not to be revealed in a review). Hector, also psychologically scarred, works as a handyman around the mission, becomes a heavy drinker, has a dalliance with the Mrs, returns to a grubby New Jersey city and an equally grubby apartment where he continues to drink heavily, hangs out in a slimy bar, works in a dilapidated strip mall as a janitor, meets a possible female redeemer (who has an unfortunate end) and ends up traveling with June (she is rapidly dying of stomach cancer, this after a lifetime of relentless, ambitious striving, culminating as a successful antiques dealer) on a quest for their missing son. The missing son, on a European escapade of theft and deception, is estranged from June and his existence was previously unknown to Hector.

There is a certain element in the writer's craft which transcends the plot, the style, the "wordcraft" and the topicality of a book, whether a work of fiction, semi-fiction or pure fact. This is the element which engages the reader on both a "visceral" as well as an emotional and intellectual level. For some reason, Lee's book fails to engage beyond the intellectual and artistic planes. In my estimation, the closest recent parallel to Lee's book is "War Trash", by Ha Jin. While this is not "genre" fiction, it comes close to it. Since "Surrendered" is a work of fiction with aspirations to artistic greatness, it should be compared with great works and it falls a bit short. Lee does an artful job of unfolding the intertwined fates of these various ad disparate characters and, particularly in the cases of June and Hector, is quite convincing in his depictions. The end of the book is melodramatic and forced in its striving toward great symbolic content and arch symbolism. The sex (love?) scenes are arty, contrived, vague and too plentiful. Nonetheless, "Surrendered" is a fine example of the writer's art. What it isn't is a book which rests at the pinnacle of the novelist's craft.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Living in the past, March 30, 2010
This review is from: The Surrendered (Hardcover)
The incident told at the start of Chang-rae Lee's latest novel was inspired by the experience of the author's father as a child in 1950, a North Korean citizen evacuated as the war intensified between North and South. His father's experience here transmogrified into the attempt of June Han to flee with her younger brother and sister, it's a heart-wrenching episode that sets the tone for what is to follow. Unexpectedly however, much of the remainder of the novel relates to an older June living in New York in the 1980s, who is suffering from a terminal illness and has just sold up her antique business, planning to go searching not for any of her lost siblings during the war, but for her son Nicholas - a young boy with a troubled childhood who has disappeared and is suspected to be living a life of fraud and petty crime in Italy.

The location and time period may change, but essentially the characteristics set out at the beginning of the novel remain constant. This is a book about damaged people - people who have seen things and undergone experiences that no-one can be expected to come through unscathed. There are several other characters who would appear to be peripheral to June in their shared experience of the war - Hector, an American GI posted on the unenviable duty of grave detail in the Korean war, and Sylvie, the wife of the minister running a Korean refugee camp with a traumatic experience of the war in China - but in reality their stories and backgrounds are just as important, opening out the story considerably, examining their own troubled backgrounds that bring them all together at one point in the same refugee camp. It's the coming together of the people with their own individual personalities, past experiences, problems and expectations that creates a dangerous powder-keg of complex emotions that are to have a huge importance on the direction of their lives.

The Surrendered consequently is certainly complicated, the author having to navigate and interweave the personalities of each of the main characters and their backstory experiences, but Chang-rae Lee handles this masterfully, structuring the novel brilliantly. There's no simplified alternate chaptering system here between past and present, from character to character and, barring one central incident (an unnecessary and bizarrely staged accident that reunites two of the characters), the author lays everything out in the most natural way possible. The present often gives way to memories of the past, since everything is of course interrelated - which is evidently what the author wants to show. It's not June's story, and her condition and experiences are not standalone experiences - they involve others and the experience of others dictate how they relate to her.

The Surrendered can be tough going then, the author taking on quite a lot in his in-depth examination of several personalities, their back stories and their interconnectedness - particularly when those stories are highly traumatic ones that have left the characters permanently damaged. But any difficulties with reading the novel lie not within the fine writing or the expert structuring, but within the weight of horrendous wartime experiences of the characters and their struggles to adapt to a normal life. This is such a powerful and well-written book however that the misery is something worth enduring for the dazzling and inspirational rays of light that ultimately shine through the gloom.
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The Surrendered
The Surrendered by Chang-Rae Lee (Paperback - March 1, 2011)
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