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192 of 196 people found the following review helpful
Within the last 30 years, after working in the health field as a medical professional and obtaining a copy of the first edition of this very helpful guide, this book is outstanding in every aspect as a valuable reference to emergency situations, where no other help is available. Although I have collected hundreds of books that cover this topic, I felt this one is extremely useful for my daughter to have in her home. This handbook outlines several conditions for one to identify with as it offers step-by-step instructions, with solutions for unexpected health problems. This informative guide also prepares for any disaster, where help is not on the way. It is specifically designed for the non-medical professional to help deal and cope with unexpected issues during emergencies. Some of the topics covered are fractures, nosebleed, chest pain, and much more. Dr. Joseph Alton highlights several medical conditions, covering over 100 medical issues. In addition, he provides information on how to handle different situations, what to look for, and how to treat. This is a valuable, essential reference book for every home. Highly recommended!
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241 of 256 people found the following review helpful
on August 7, 2013
This is probably a decent book to have for most preppers, but I'm really not certain it was worth $35.00. It reminds me a little of "Where There is no Doctor" ($20.00), but for preppers . There are a lot of western, orthodox concepts that are very applicable to post-disaster medicine, as well as some that aren't, I believe due to lack of austere medicine experience on the part of the authors. All of the information in here is available from other sources, but if it's worth it to you to have it all in one book, then by all means, spend the money.
The place that the book is extremely weak is in the area of alternative medicine, which would very likely be the area that a person needs to be strongest in if there really is a full collapse. Simply stocking up on pharmaceuticals is just not any kind of answer for the long-range disaster, primarily because of the fact that every single medical situation has to then be judged from a standpoint of rationing whatever you have, all orthodox pharmaceuticals will be looted before anything else, and in a nationwide (or worldwide) collapse, there will be a LOT of need for medical help.
Although the authors stress the need for hygiene, sanitation, wound cleansing, etc., the part that people really need to know is plant medicine. This is no fault of the authors - they just don't have the experience in the area, so the herbal "remedies" they list (and it is just that - bare lists) read like the typical plantain-on-bug-bites 'advice' that you can find on even the least herbal-literate websites. In other words, useless plant medicine knowledge if you really want to try to put it to the test that a post-disaster puts everything to.
This kind of thing isn't an empty field of information in the USA. There are herbalists out there who are using plant medicine for serious acute trauma and illness care every day and in the field, and have been doing so for decades, such as Sevensong, Doc Garcia, Sam Coffman, Kiva Rose, etc. I'm waiting for any or all of them to come out with a book on how to really deal with a full post-disaster collapse using plant medicine because nobody else really is doing this. There is unfortunately a big hole where there needs to be a collective volume of information on this kind of subject specific to plant medicine. So it's good that it's at least mentioned a little in this book, but it falls far short on actual usable depth or experience.
Nothing against the authors - they're coming from the typical allopathic-approach to plant medicine (and they're much more open-minded about it than most of their peers, so kudos for that), but I don't think they really have the experience of dealing with post-disaster medicine in any modality.
So - it's one of the best books out there on the subject (which unfortunately isn't saying much), but still falls way short in a lot of areas that it should be addressing more from direct experience than copy/paste and organize from rescue/trauma manuals, etc.
One other note: I also think the approach to wound closure is a bit liberal toward the side of closing a wound in the field. Post-disaster settings are environments rich with pathogens in the way that one will find nowhere else. Rather than bowing to the uneducated hue and cry by preppers who want to know how to suture, I'd like to see the authors really stress the need for non-closure in any kind of post-disaster field environment. At least any kind of wound that the layman would be able to suture anyway.
Again, this is more a question of post-disaster experience, and is typical for most US doctors. For instance in Haiti after the earthquake, orthopedic surgeons were using external fixation for broken bones left and right. Within months after this type of initial care, this treatment was a disaster in itself in reality as there was no follow-up care available and horrible hygiene issues.
These are the kinds of little things that it takes experience in order to really write about in a fully useful manner. I'm giving it 4 stars instead of 3 because at least these 2 are trying, and very few others are even doing that much.
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83 of 94 people found the following review helpful
on February 20, 2014
This is a thick paperback. Its not something you can simply toss into your BOB and take with you. Its very easy reading but if Im in an emergency situation, all the verbage is a waste of precious time. I bought this so I would know how to use my fish biotics and they give a general one-size fits all for about eight recommended drugs but then says I should refer to the PDR or internet for specific diseases. That's not much help since I am definitely not hauling a PDR in my BOB. I returned it because of all the extra words and lack of content. I gave it three stars for ease of reading. As the many listed recommended reading list at the end suggests; this is just a companion book, not an all-inclusive medical survival manual. $35.00 is too much for that kind of book, in my opinion.
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77 of 88 people found the following review helpful
on July 3, 2013
After I started my journey into preparedness, I soon realized that there was one category that I didn't feel comfortable in, medical preparedness. I could buy "stuff" and learn and practice skills, but the medical aspect of preparedness; not just acquiring first aid supplies, but knowing what to do if ___ (fill in the blank) happened, bothered me.
I was really excited when I found Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy's website. They post articles on medical preparedness from a collapse scenario perspective. I still read (and link) their stuff...religiously!

The Survival Medicine Handbook is different in that the premise is no one is on the way! Most medical survival books will give the reader information on how to stabilize an injured person until they can receive professional medical treatment. But what if you are in a situation where that is not possible?

to read more of the review, visit - [...]
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60 of 68 people found the following review helpful
on July 23, 2013
I have only read about half of the book, but I am extremely impressed. It provides straight forward, and helpful information on a variety of medical topics. As a healthcare professional myself, I was afraid it would be too basic, but that fear was unfounded. I already have a list of items that I would not have thought to get, & I suspect I will be adding to that list as I continue to read. I highly recommend this book to anyone who would like to be prepared for a time where medical help is unavailable or non-existent.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on December 23, 2013
Book is well written and easy to read.
Book is great for basic emergency treatments.
Think of it like an advanced Boy Scout Handbook for medicine.
It is not a how-to guide to be looking at while you are trying to perform aid on a screaming, bleeding patient.
It's a book to read, learn, and know before you need to use it so you know what to do "just in case".
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
on October 19, 2013
Not a bad book for someone with a medical background to use as a review. Also good to give ideas for improvisation in off grid situation. Would strongly recommend William Forgey's book,"Wilderness Medicine",and the Hesperian Foundation's book, "Where there is no Doctor" as foundation works. They have not failed me in real world situations.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on February 7, 2014
I was surprised by how much of this I already knew, but then I am not the normal customer I think. If you need to develop a basic understanding of first aid and survival medicine, especially some tricks on what to stock and what to grow, this is a good book for you!

If you are already know basic first aid, you are pretty far down the road. The book is still useful, because of the tips the nurse gives about gardens and medical herbs. Further the Doc give you some pre-made letters for your Doctor to view. These are helpful in winning over a Doctors confidence in allowing you to stockpile critical meds, like diabetic sugar control, blood pressure control, etc.

Lastly there is a section on recommended books and research that will be really helpful for advancing your knowledge.

All in all, it was good to read the words of a Doctor and Nurse team that get it. They don't think anybody is a kook for preparing for a societal meltdown. They understand that within 48 hours, disease will be the greatest killer of people and build the book with that in mind.

One more "neat" thing is the Doctor maintains a website where he demonstrates many of the techniques that will be useful in survival medicine.

Four stars instead of five because I thought the book would have a bit more detailed information. But now I realize I should have read the title more clearly. It does say, "Survival Medicine Handbook," not "Doctorate Degree in Surgery." My bad.

This IS the place to start if you have no real knowledge of medicine. Ordering this book is recommended just for its resources on purchasing much needed supplies from "unusual sources."

You won't be sorry you bought it in any case.

Jeff
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18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
on July 21, 2013
This is more than a reference book. Don't just stash it away somewhere out of sight. This updated and expanded edition is solid evidence that Joe and Amy Alton (aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy) listen to the feedback they get from readers, and that they have a heart for those who truly wish to be prepared. In addition to covering more topics than the first book, they've included many more illustrations in this edition. Some may be disappointed the pictures aren't in color. But Joe and Amy stated in an interview on DestinySurvival Radio with me that color photos are much more expensive to produce. They've kept the price down by self publishing. That also gave them the control they wanted to have regarding the book's content. To me that's a real plus and makes this book an asset to have on the shelf both now and for the future.
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30 of 38 people found the following review helpful
on June 17, 2013
This book is a upgrade from the fist one, that is for sure. There is a lot more info on the extreme stuff that was not in the first. 100% good.
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