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The System of Liberty: Themes in the History of Classical Liberalism Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 231 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (July 4, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521182093
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521182096
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #234,611 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"George Smith's lectures on classical liberalism had a profound effect on my thinking. Now, at long last, others may profit from his prodigious learning in this absolutely 'must read' book for anyone interested in modern libertarianism and its historical roots. Clear, accessible, balanced, and powerfully reasoned."
--Randy E. Barnett, author of The Structure of Liberty: Justice and the Rule of Law

"This is a lucid, concise, but at the same time a deep overview of the origins and structure of classical liberal thought. With a fluid and engaging style, Smith corrects many of our modern misconceptions about how early liberals understood themselves and the terms on which they debated. Anyone interested in liberal thought, whether in its 'classical', modern 'high liberal', or libertarian forms, will find this a valuable resource. Even critics of classical liberalism will find, thanks to Smith, that classical liberal thought contains a great deal of forgotten wisdom."
--Jason Brennan, author of Libertarianism: What Everyone Needs to Know

"George H. Smith is an independent scholar who for many decades has lectured and written about the history of classical liberal and libertarian ideas. The System of Liberty is his first extended take on this history to be published by a high-level academic press-a tribute both to Smith's dogged scholarship and to the rise in the respectability of the libertarian tradition he explains and espouses...the information and analysis are always interesting." -Brian Doherty, Reason Magazine

Book Description

Liberal individualism, or "classical liberalism" as it is often called, refers to a political philosophy in which liberty plays the central role. This book demonstrates a conceptual unity within the manifestations of classical liberalism by tracing the history of several interrelated and reinforcing themes.

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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Mike Mertens on May 27, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed George H. Smith's The System of Liberty and I highly recommend it to anyone interested in the history of ideas generally and classical liberalism specifically.

The book is very well written and is truly an intellectual page turner. The ideas it covers are very relevant in many of today's political/intellectual discussions and there are several sections of the book that I re-read in order to think the ideas through more thoroughly.

The book covers "Themes in the History of Classical Liberalism" and it has chapters that cover: "Liberalism, Old and New", "Liberalism and the Public Good", "Liberal Ideology and Political Philosophy", "The Idea of Freedom", and "Conflicts in Classical Liberalism" among other topics. I learned a lot in each chapter but there are 3 chapters that I want to focus in on in this review.

The chapter on "Liberalism and the Public Good" covers some key ideas related to natural rights, utilitarianism and the public welfare. John Locke and the early liberals believed in the compatibility of natural rights and the public good. Smith explains 4 roles that the public good plays in John Locke's political philosophy and he makes the key point that "Locke indicated that concern for the public good restricts what a government may do." He then proceeds to cover the early utilitarians by discussing the ideas of Joseph Priestley. He concludes the chapter with a discussion on the vagueness of the concept of the public good including an insightful discussion of the US Constitution and the general welfare clause.

The chapter on "The Radical Edge of Liberalism" is my favorite chapter in the book.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Ryan Young on July 5, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Most works of political philosophy stick to the big names - Locke, Hobbes, Bentham and Mill, and the like. This book offers fresh insights into these important thinkers, which alone makes it a worthy contribution to the literature. But for this reader, the real value of this book was an introduction to unfamiliar names such as Thomas Hodgskin, William Graham Sumner, and Georg Simmel.

The book also provides a public service by correcting popular misconceptions of liberal thinkers. While Herbert Spencer used the term "survival of the fittest" in his writings, he was no social Darwinist. He explicitly rejected that term and what it stands for. He used "fit" to mean "fitted to one's environment," without any of the normative implications his opponents so eagerly ascribed to him. There is also a valuable discussion of why individualism does not imply atomism, but rather the opposite.

Smith has packed a lot of knowledge into a short volume (225 pages). This is the kind of book where multiple readings would continue to pay dividends. Highly recommended.

(Edited to correct a minor grammatical error.)
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By PETER D TAYLOR on August 1, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Excellently written from a Libertarian perspective. I hope to soon read a sequel covering later events from the 1900's until today for without the history of "liberty" we will make the same mistakes over and over again.

There were some tantalizing hints in the chapter entitled, "The Anarchy Game," that need to be explored. Where does George H. Smith now stand? Has he reconsidered constitutionalism? In the chapter, "Sovereign State, Sovereign Self” he writes that the State is a normative institution and that, “This means that a moral claim (specifically a claim about rights) is implicit in every coercive measure it takes.” So, is the “constant consent” required by Rational Anarchism doomed to fail? Is a “better” Constitution required for a more perfect union?

Specifically what amendments or rewriting of the U.S. Constitution are needed to stop and reverse the encroachment of government upon our individual rights? What are the hazards of a Constitutional Convention? Is “The Repeal Amendment” which is a proposed amendment to the US Constitution designed to restore the balance of power between the federal and state governments that our Founders originally envisioned really needed?

Thomas Jefferson wrote:
“Each generation is as independent of the one preceding, as that was of all which had gone before. It has then, like them, a right to choose for itself the form of government it believes most promotive of its own happiness . . . .”
end quote

The recent war of words between mainline Republican Governor Christy and libertarian Senator Rand Paul show us we need the ammunition to fight a political and moral war in 2016. So, Mr. Smith, are you ready to go to Washington?
Semper cogitans fidele,
Peter Taylor
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Timothy A. Starr on August 13, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
No one knows the intellectual history of classical liberalism better than George Smith, and this is a splendid introduction to its major themes.
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