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The TNIV and the Gender-Neutral Bible Controversy Paperback – January 1, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 528 pages
  • Publisher: B&H Academic; 1st Edition edition (January 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0805431934
  • ISBN-13: 978-0805431933
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,851,525 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Wayne A. Grudem is Professor and Chairman of the Department of Biblical and Systematic Theology at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. He received a Ph.D. in New Testament from the University of Cambridge, England, an M.Div. from Westminster Seminary, Philadelphia, and a B.A. from Harvard University.He has published seven books and is a co-founder, past president, and currently vice president of the Council on Biblical Manhood and Womanhood. He and his wife, Margaret, live in Libertyville, Illinois.

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Customer Reviews

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Women are NOT men but are compelled to feel comfortable being referred to in the masculine.
LDM
On the other hand, if TNIV folks did not exist, our Bible translations would remain using language that does not address the changes of today's language.
Rufus123
This is perhaps the most intricate and detailed critique of inclusive language translations that is available.
Steven H. Propp

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Rufus123 on March 2, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
All of this book's critiques are based on the TNIV's 2002, release. If the reader of this book looks carefully at this book's examples of where the TNIV goes wrong, you'll notice it references the 2002 edition. But there are differences between the 2005 and 2002 edition. These changes were probably made because of people like Grudem!

This book does explain their side well. They did expose some questionable parts of the 2002 edition, and their critiquing of the TNIV is probably what drove some updates to be made of the 2005 edition.

I think this book illustrates why it is good to always have two opposites arguing an issue. Just like in politics, each side's constant critiquing of the other, only drives the final product to be stronger! If the Grudem like people did not exist, some real problems could have remained in the TNIV 2005 edition. On the other hand, if TNIV folks did not exist, our Bible translations would remain using language that does not address the changes of today's language. We wouldn't realize that "he\man\brothers" no longer means both male and females to those using today's language.

The TNIV does have some issues, but so do all Bible translations. Just like with any other Bible translation, you should have one or two others that you read also. Grudem's picking apart of the TNIV does not invalidate it as a translation, anymore than picking apart the nasb or kjv would invalidate them as translations also

Read this book, so your views on this issue can be sharpened. Then go buy a book favoring inclusive language and read that too!
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Format: Paperback
Vern Poythress (born 1946) is a Calvinist philosopher and theologian, who teaches New Testament at Westminster Theological Seminary; he has written books such as The Returning King: A Guide to the Book of Revelation, What Are Spiritual Gifts? (Basics of the Faith), Symphonic Theology: The Validity of Multiple Perspectives in Theology, etc. Wayne Grudem taught for 20 years at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, served on the committee overseeing the English Standard Version translation of the Bible, and in 1999 was the president of the Evangelical Theological Society; he has also written books such as Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine.

They wrote in their Preface to this 2004 book, "Some people might wonder, 'Why do you spend so much time arguing about the Bible, for goodness' sake?'... Our reply is that when accurate translation of the Bible is at stake, it is hard to think of anything in the world that is more important to argue about..." They note that the dispute is primarily about the translation of only five terms: father; son; brother; man; and he/him/his. They authors note that neither the Greek words, nor the meaning of those Greek words have changed, so that "the real question (is) mostly one of English usage." (Pg.
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8 of 13 people found the following review helpful By LDM on February 15, 2011
Format: Paperback
After reading several documents and sources on the gender-neutral controversy, I find critics of these new translations baffling. Even in English, the use of masculine pronouns and the word "-man" (i.e. chairman) is used in our language to connote both male and female applicability.

Christians must face the reality that masculine pronouns and male representation historically has been the standard method of male/female referencing.

Has it ever occurred to us that it's dismissive to lump women with men but wince at the thought of lumping men with women. Women are NOT men but are compelled to feel comfortable being referred to in the masculine. It's gone on so long most of us don't realize how dismissive it is.

The arguments and refutations are not concerns of misapplication, but refusal to admit that the dignity and personhood of women should actually be acknowledge and not co-opted into male identity in written language.

Most men would be absolutely insulted to be referred to collectively with feminine references yet most men truly believe women should be comfortable with masculine reference.

If traditionalists truly believe biblical truths apply to everyone, it's best to get over the fear of using language to include everyone. Translations like these are NOT about inclusion, but are about using language to respect, address and acknowledge each gender.
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