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Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Used in Worn Condition. No CD or Access Code. Ex-library books. Some Markings. Small tears and wear on corners and edges
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The Table Where Rich People Sit Hardcover – September 1, 1994


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Hardcover, September 1, 1994
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 7 - 10 years
  • Grade Level: 2 - 5
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers; 1st ed edition (September 1, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684196530
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684196534
  • Product Dimensions: 10.3 x 8.3 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.3 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,858,829 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

With the same prose poetry and sparsely colored line drawings that mark their other collaborations, Baylor and Parnall tell the story of Mountain Girl, who begins to see the wealth in her family's simple lifestyle. Ages 6-9.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From School Library Journal

Grade 3-5-A simple, philosophical, thought-provoking piece. Mountain Girl (nicknamed for her place of birth) would like her parents to earn more money so they could have nicer things. At a family meeting around their "...old, scratched-up, homemade kitchen table," her parents, who work outdoors for a living, convince her and her younger brother that the enjoyment of their natural surroundings and the richness of one another's company are worth a fortune. The girl's first-person account has the feel of a diary. Parnall's familiar, stylized line drawings, colored here with hues of ochre, turquoise, and apple green, provide a dreamlike accompaniment to Baylor's words of wisdom. A devotee of nature, the author reminds readers that, despite the fact that many people may not choose this free-spirited, nonmaterialistic lifestyle, an occasional pause to reflect on personal values is a worthwhile effort. A sound piece of advice.
Susan Scheps, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Baylor lives and writes in Arizona, presenting images of the Southwest and an intense connection between the land and the people. Her prose illustrates vividly the value of simplicity, the natural world, and the balance of life within it.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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That is what this book illustrates.
bookclub girl
I love this story, personally, because it not only reflects my own values so perfectly, but it has served as a reminder of the really Important Things in life.
B. Estorga
This is certainly one of those books that should and will cause the reader, both child and adult, to stop for a moment of reflection.
D. Blankenship

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 47 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on July 1, 2004
Format: Paperback
You may not be able to tell from where you read this, but at this moment in time I am punching myself roundly. Why? For the simple reason that I made a bizarre and irrational assumption about this book when I first heard about it. Picture this... it is 1997 and I'm rooming with a dear hippie friend in a Quaker college dorm. She's describing to me her favorite book: "The Table Where Rich People Sit" by Byrd Baylor. As she explains the plot of the book to me, even (I now sigh) handing me a copy, I jump to what I felt was a logical conclusion. Obviously this book was originally published in the 1970s. After all, it deals with the price of happiness, the glory of the natural environment, and the beauty of the world around us. Flash forward some seven years later and I'm reading "The Table Where Rich People Sit" once again. It is, undoubtedly, a magnificently beautiful book in all respects. Then I flip to the publication page and find the year "1994" staring me in the face. 1994? This book... this lovely free-flowing book about leaving "civilized" society to accept the world on your own terms... this was written in the 1990s? Well there you have it. I made the ridiculous assumption that this tale simply was a part of a larger social upheaval when, in fact, it was a small rebellion in and of itself. My bad. My bad.

In this story Mountain Girl has called a meeting of the members of her family. She lives with her mom, dad, and brother in a home outskirting cliffs, canyons, deserts, and mountains, and it has just occurred to her that they are by no means rich. To make her case, Mountain Girl insists that the family recognize that they are seriously lacking in funds.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By B. Estorga on February 27, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I checked this book out for my son (4.5 y.o.) at my college's library, and every day since I brought it home, he has wanted me to read it to him. I love this story, personally, because it not only reflects my own values so perfectly, but it has served as a reminder of the really Important Things in life.

Money isn't what counts ~ it's the sunrise... the colors of the shadows on mountains... the feel of squash on hands dusty with earth... the stretch of blue sky overhead. I cannot think of a book that better illustrates these than The Table Where Rich People Sit.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on October 8, 2006
Format: Hardcover
The Table Where Rich People Sit touched my heart. It made me realize that I have more riches than I knew. Simple riches like the colors of Autumn. Mountain Girl didn't understand about her riches either. But by the end of the story she knew that nature and family were the best kind of riches. Read this book so you can realize what your riches are, too.

Brielle age 9 parker, colo.
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Format: Paperback
This is certainly one of those books that should and will cause the reader, both child and adult, to stop for a moment of reflection. The question here is asked, in a thoughtful, yet mellow way, just what in life is truly important and by inference, what is not. Every so often we adults need to take to take inventory and what a better way to do it than with your child?

This is the story of a little girl; "Mountain Girl," whose parents live in and near the mountains in the South West part of our country. They live a very simple existence, raise their own foods, train horses and do what ever other job comes along...but it MUST be outdoors; they MUST be able to work and live under the open sky! The little girl in our story notices that there are patches on her little brothers pants, that their house is not very nice, their table is hand made and rather run down and their entire image is that of being "poor." During a family meeting she brings this subject up and asked the question "why are we poor." It should be noted at this point that this so called poverty her parents have placed them in is a self imposed poverty; and as the story progresses the question is asked, and answered I might add, as to whether or not the family is indeed poor. Of course each adult and child must answer this question for themselves, but I must say the answer was easy for me to come to as I am a bit like the parents in this story anyway.

What price do you place on a sunset, the image of an eagles nest, listening to the coyotes speak at night, watching an eagle soar, seeing a cactus bloom from bud to finished flower, to hear the wind speaking through the rocks and sand...in general, to have the freedom from the drudgery of working in an office cubicle day after day and chasing after "things?
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 15, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Mountain Girl complains that her family is poor. They sit at a ramshakle table they made themselves as the family discusses what they do have and discover that they are wealthy beyond belief. They have sunsets, eagles, mountins, etc. A good reminder of what is really important.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on October 7, 2006
Format: Paperback
The young girl in this story doesn't notice that her family is rich. I think her family is rich because they get to sit under the stars so shiney at night and there is always a shining start of the day in the morning and they get to watch nature grow and on having a family right there for her. And that's how I think she is rich.

Malia... age9
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