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The Tale of the Devil Hardcover – June 3, 2012


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 330 pages
  • Publisher: Woodland Press, LLC (June 3, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0985264012
  • ISBN-13: 978-0985264017
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #744,632 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

This collaborative effort of Coleman C. Hatfield and Robert Y. Spence, The Tale Of The Devil, is the factual biography of Devil Anse Hatfield, and the role he played in the infamous and brutal Hatfield and McCoy feud. Coleman Hatfield is Devil Anse Hatfield's direct descendant and brings a special and personal expertise to this project. The Tale Of The Devil candidly examines this figure's early life, the origins of the Hatfield and McCoy feud, its brutal toll, denouement, and ultimate conclusion, as well as the impact it has had on subsequent generations of Hatfields and McCoys. A profound, sometimes dark, yet often insightful life story, The Tale Of The Devil is a very highly recommended addition to American History and Biography collections. --Midwest Book Review

There is exciting news for all lovers of local folklore and American history alike. The fascinating tale of the life of one of West Virginia's most colorful figures, the patriarch of the famed feuding Hatfields, is available to the public. The Tale of the Devil is the story of the legendary Devil Anse Hatfield, beginning with his childhood in frontier Appalachia, describing his Civil War days as a Confederate soldier, painting a richly detailed background into just who this man was and from where he came. Then it gives a captivating and enlightening bird's-eye view of the Hatfield-McCoy feud, the killings, and the post-feud years when the shooting subsided. Because this manuscript gleans much of its information from grandson Coleman A. Hatfield's exhaustive manuscripts, journals, and audiotapes, which were compiled and collected over a lifetime, the story is fresh and entertaining to read and offers additional insider information, which has never before been published. Finally, the book features an index, bibliography, endnotes, and thirty pages of photographs many rare, including one particular photo of Devil Anse never before published, taken when he was about 35 years old. The authors have sorted through the fables and exaggerations, studied Hatfield family accounts and documented history, and created a noteworthy biography. The story of Anderson Hatfield is appropriately told through a direct descendant. Likewise, the co-author, Robert Spence, is a resident of Logan County, and distantly related to Devil Anse, as well. --The Logan Banner, Logan, WV. As you've most certainly heard, a truce was signed on June 14th, 2003 at the Hatfield & McCoy Festival at Pikeville, KY, that received worldwide attention. As the ink was drying on the symbolic document, which announced the end to Appalachia's most infamous and violent family upheaval, the great-grandson of Anderson Devil Anse Hatfield, released additional evidence and historical facts surrounding the notorious family fuss. There is excitement around the Mountain State, and across the nation, among lovers of Appalachian folklore and American history alike. This long-awaited hardbound volume about the fascinating life of one of West Virginia s most colorful figures, Anderson Devil Anse Hatfield, the patriarch of the famed feuding Hatfield family, is the first of its kind. Because this manuscript gleans much of its information from Dr. Hatfield s father, C.A. Hatfield, and his exhaustive manuscripts, journals, and audiotapes, which were compiled and collected over a lifetime, the story is fresh and entertaining to read and offers insider info, which has never before been published. The book features an index, bibliography, endnotes, and thirty pages of rare family photographs. As surprising as it might sound, there has never been a biography of Anderson Devil Anse Hatfield. We believe this is an important scholarly offering for history bookshelves, being that it is authored by the grandson and great-grandson of Devil Anse Hatfield. If you enjoy American history, it just doesn't get any better. --Williamson Daily News, Williamson, WV

There is exciting news for all lovers of local folklore and American history alike. The fascinating tale of the life of one of West Virginia's most colorful figures, the patriarch of the famed feuding Hatfields, is available to the public. The Tale of the Devil is the story of the legendary Devil Anse Hatfield, beginning with his childhood in frontier Appalachia, describing his Civil War days as a Confederate soldier, painting a richly detailed background into just who this man was and from where he came. Then it gives a captivating and enlightening bird's-eye view of the Hatfield-McCoy feud, the killings, and the post-feud years when the shooting subsided. Because this manuscript gleans much of its information from grandson Coleman A. Hatfield's exhaustive manuscripts, journals, and audiotapes, which were compiled and collected over a lifetime, the story is fresh and entertaining to read and offers additional insider information, which has never before been published. Finally, the book features an index, bibliography, endnotes, and thirty pages of photographs many rare, including one particular photo of Devil Anse never before published, taken when he was about 35-years-old. The authors have sorted through the fables and exaggerations, studied Hatfield family accounts and documented history, and created a noteworthy biography. The story of Anderson Hatfield is appropriately told through a direct descendant. Likewise, the co-author, Robert Spence, is a resident of Logan County, and distantly related to Devil Anse, as well. --The Logan Banner, Logan, WV

As you've most certainly heard, a truce was signed on June 14th, 2003 at the Hatfield & McCoy Festival at Pikeville, KY, that received worldwide attention. As the ink was drying on the symbolic document, which announced the end to Appalachia's most infamous and violent family upheaval, the great-grandson of Anderson Devil Anse Hatfield, released additional evidence and historical facts surrounding the notorious family fuss. There is excitement around the Mountain State, and across the nation, among lovers of Appalachian folklore and American history alike. This long-awaited hardbound volume about the fascinating life of one of West Virginia s most colorful figures, Anderson Devil Anse Hatfield, the patriarch of the famed feuding Hatfield family, is the first of its kind. Because this manuscript gleans much of its information from Dr. Hatfield s father, C.A. Hatfield, and his exhaustive manuscripts, journals, and audiotapes, which were compiled and collected over a lifetime, the story is fresh and entertaining to read and offers insider info, which has never before been published. The book features an index, bibliography, endnotes, and thirty pages of rare family photographs. As surprising as it might sound, there has never been a biography of Anderson Devil Anse Hatfield. We believe this is an important scholarly offering for history bookshelves, being that it is authored by the grandson and great-grandson of Devil Anse Hatfield. If you enjoy American history, it just doesn't get any better than this title, The Tale of the Devil. --Williamson Daily News, Williamson, WV

About the Author

Dr. Coleman C. Hatfield was a uniquely talented, creative and brilliant man. Storyteller, author and historian, he unexpectedly passed away on Monday, January 14th, 2008, at age 81. He was born in Logan, West Virginia, on September 25, 1926. Coleman was not only a noted historian, writer and president of Hatfield Historical Associates, he was also a dedicated optometrist, genealogist, gemologist, botanist, bee-keeper and storyteller. A true Hatfield, he loaded his own ammo and was a master with a pistol or rifle on a target range. He was an exceptionally learned man who was passionate about many things, including the preservation of Hatfield family history. Coleman graduated from Logan High School, Concord University, and Illinois College of Optometry. At Illinois College of Optometry he was a professor and chairman of the vision therapy and children s clinic. He was also the author of the vision therapy book, The Joy of Optometry. He served as president of the West Virginia Optometric Association and was a member of the examination board of the College of Optometrists in Vision Development. He practiced optometry in both Chicago and Logan with his daughter, Dr. Arabel E. Hatfield, and son, Dr. R. Mark Hatfield, until his retirement. As a writer and historian, Coleman was named West Virginia Author of the Year, a prestigious award presented by Tamarack, The Best of West Virginia, for this biography, The Tale of the Devil, about his great-grandfather, Anderson Devil Anse Hatfield.

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Customer Reviews

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Bought this book and another one about them for my wife.
Bill
A profound, sometimes dark, yet often insightful life story, The Tale Of The Devil is a very highly recommended addition to American History and Biography collections.
Midwest Book Review
The first book that I read seemed poorly written, had disorganized and confusing content.
Garry A. Casson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

57 of 58 people found the following review helpful By Kenneth F. Anderson on November 21, 2005
Format: Hardcover
A collaborative effort of Coleman C. Hatfield and Robert Y. Spence, The Tale of The Devil purports to be a biography of Anderson Hatfield, more commonly known as Devil Anse Hatfield, of Hatfield and McCoy fame, but it's more than that. Assisted by original manuscripts from Coleman A. Hatfield, a grandson of Devil Anse, the authors describe several significant members of the Hatfield family in their changing mileaus.

Not intended as an account of the infamous Appalachian feud, The Tale of The Devil nevertheless describes the issues surrounding the feud from an insider's perspective, admittedly from the vantage point of a Hatfield, yet respectful of the McCoys, and written with an awareness of the existence another point of view.

"Geography explains people." The story goes on, beyond this opening statement in the forward to prove the truth of it, including a description of the geography in which the events will take place, and of the people who lived there, in the area along the Appalachian mountain chain, near the Kentucky border in what is now known as Logan County, West Virginia.

The authors depend heavily upon research conducted by Coleman Alderson Hatfield, the son of William Anderson (Cap) Hatfield, and the eldest surviving grandson of the legendary Devil Anse Hatfield. Coleman A. Hatfield was a lawyer with a photographic memory and a passion for the truth of his heritage, even when it wasn't pretty.

Chapter one begins where you might expect, with the birth of Anse Hatfield in a log cabin on the Straight Fork of Mate Creek, a tributary of the Tug Fork of the Big Sandy River which marked the border of western Virginia, now known as West Virginia, and Kentucky.
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35 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Chad Coleman Simpson on February 2, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I grew up around the tales of Devil Anse Hatfield because Dr. Hatfield happens to be my grandfather as well. They way he told them to me when I used to sit on his lap is exactly as they are portrayed in this book. I was reluctant at first to read it, because his storytelling is so vivd and I didn't think the page would capture that. It has, and I'm proud to see such a meticulously researched account of my ancestors being praised as it should. My grandfather put an infinite amount of work into this account, history buffs enjoy!
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Sgt. Pepper on October 6, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I read this hardback book, and I have to candidly admit this biography is great! I love pioneer and American history, and this work vivedly portrays the mountain life of Appalachia in the 1840s through the turn of the century. These Hatfield family members were tough hombres, and the McCoys were hardheaded as well. The thing that makes this a real unusual story for its time is the inter-state rivalry, the WV Hatfields and the KY McCoys. For instance, Cap Hatfield, the son of Devil Anse, spent the rest of his life worried about being deported to the Kentucky side of the Tug River. The time period is expertly displayed through Dr. Hatfield's prose, and the words of Robert Spence. In all, this is a magnificent biography of historical proportions. Although I suppose the chances are slim, I still hope that this work earns literary accolades and a solid place in the library of great American biographies. I recommend this book for everyone who wants to know more about this country and its people.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 10, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Okay, this is a book everyone should own, especially those who like frontier American history. I received this book as a gift for Christmas. Up until then, I had never heard of it. Boy, I never dreamed it would be so thorough and exciting. I want to know more about these people along the Tug River and Logan County, WV. The book I have says that it's already in its second printing -- no wonder! It's a great book by two great writers, Coleman Hatfield and Robert Spence. After I read the book, I had the opportunity to meet Coleman Hatfield in Montgomery, Alabama during a book-signing. He is a scholar, and a great story-teller.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on October 14, 2003
Format: Hardcover
The collaborative effort of Coleman C. Hatfield and Robert Y. Spence, The Tale Of The Devil is the factual biography of Devil Anse Hatfield, and the role he played in the infamous and brutal Hatfield and McCoy feud. Co-author Coleman Hatfield is Devil Anse Hatfield's direct descendant and brings a special "insider's" expertise to this project. The Tale Of The Devil candidly examines this figure's early life, the origins of the Hatfield and McCoy feud, its brutal toll, denouement, and ultimate conclusion -- as well as the impact it has had on subsequent generations of Hatfields and McCoys. A profound, sometimes dark, yet often insightful life story, The Tale Of The Devil is a very highly recommended addition to American History and Biography collections.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Melvin G. Hatfield on May 7, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I have had this book on my shelf for a few years now. I refer to it often when friends ask questions about the story.

My grandfather was Ewing Hatfield, who crossed the Tug River into Kentucky as a young man from West Virginia. He bought land in Rogers Gap, KY (between Georgetown and Lexington), and grew tobacco, raised cows, chickens, hogs etc. He sired 11 children, four boys and seven girls all who helped work the farm. Three of the four boys served in WWII and the fourth served in Korea. I recall grandpa Hatfield taking me on his knee, as a child (I'm now 65), and telling me about his memories of the feud. It was always a treat to visit when I was young.

So many stories related to this infamous tale make this a rich and exciting venture for the reader and lover of American history.

With the airing of "The Hatfields and McCoys" on the History Channel starring Kevin Costner as Devil Anse Hatfield, I suspect the story will become even more popular. I cannot urge enough the reading of this biography for those who value American folk history.
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