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The Taoist I Ching (Shambhala Classics) Paperback – May 3, 2005


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Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English, Chinese (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Inside Flap

The "Book Of Change" is considered the oldest of the Chinese classics. A book of fundamental principles by philosophers, politicians, mystics and others. To be read as a guide to comprehensive self-realization. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Series: Shambhala Classics
  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Shambhala (May 3, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590302605
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590302606
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #414,396 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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See all 21 customer reviews
I love Thomas Cleary's translation.
cweber
I think that even a little experience with meditation would go a long way in helping the reader grasp the point of the book.
James
This is a good to great book for those who have some knowledge of the I Ching and/or Taoism.
thomas foster

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Adrienne Godsmark on June 29, 1999
Format: Paperback
This poetic, enigmatic rendering has the capacity to illuminate the difference between the human mind and the mind of Tao for the reader in situations of daily life, and offers profound Taoist methods for self awareness. I have used this book for five years and feel more than any other, this book has altered my life. For any who wish to use the Book of Changes as a guide for living with the aid of the wisdom of the Tao, I reccomend this translation of the I Ching.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By JOHN on September 22, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have several editions of the i-Ching, but this is the one I would take to a desert island. This iteration of the text and commentary is relatively recent -- 18th century -- and very well developed.

Each book in Cleary's i-Ching trilogy -- Buddhist, Taoist and the Tao of Organization -- offers something unique and appealing. The Taoist i-Ching is the most metaphysical of the three and the most developed. Although the Buddhist i-Ching is a bit more human and friendly, Taoist thinking tends to mesh better with the underlying concepts.

The Taoist i-Ching is based on Complete Reality Taoism, which is very adaptible to beliefs from all walks of life. The processes of yin and yang rising and falling are most prominent in the commentaries. Overall, the edition reads as a very modern take on the ancient text.
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27 of 30 people found the following review helpful By thomas foster on April 17, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is a good to great book for those who have some knowledge of the I Ching and/or Taoism. Thomas Cleary has made many books available to the non-Chinese reader. However, he provides little commentary, no footnotes, and I sometimes find his translations suspect or lacking. It is important to understand that when Liu speaks of "eliminating Yin" and returning to the "pure Yang body" he is not speaking of Yin and Yang as light/dark, male/female, positive/negative oppositions, but to the simple fact that the Yang line is whole and the Yin line is broken. Thus, the goal is to heal the dualist fracture of the "latter heaven" condition and return to the integrated whole being of "earlier heaven." Understanding this, the "Taoist I Ching" becomes a fascinating guide to self transformation and transcendence.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Hakuyu on July 28, 2005
Format: Paperback
There seems to be a certain amount of confusion over the purpose of this version of the Yi-Ching. The publisher's blurb leaves it equaly uncertain. Liu I-ming's text-commentary which appeared in 1796, effectively used the symbols of the Yi-Ching to indicate inner processes based on Taoist yoga. To put it another way, Liu I-ming's commentary, alludes to microcosmic energy cycles which mirror the macrocosmic cycles reflected in the Yi-Ching. Without the 'nei-kung' or inner teaching which animates the process, as it were, it is hard to see how anyone could make sense of Liu I-ming's comments. In Chinese Taoist circles, the need for such supplementary teachings would have been taken for granted.

Up to a point, Cleary's translation of 'The Secret of the Golden Flower' satisfies such a requirement. He clearly disliked Wilhelm's version - not only stylistically, but because its material was a strange composite and incomplete. But - far better than either of these, is Lu K'uan Yu's (Charles Luk) translation of Chao Pi Chen's 'Secrets of Cultivating Essential Nature and Eternal Life.' (Weiser). Chao Pi Chen (b. 1860) was a practising Taoist, who not only had access to authentic Taoist materials, but Taoist masters in remote mountain locations, who had mastered the teaching. Lu K'uan Yu (b. 1898) also practised the Taoist yoga. His command of English - combined with his experience of the Yoga, enabled him to coin understandable English equivalents, helping to make the processes involved clear. It must be said that Taoists such as Liu-I-Ming or Chao Pi Chen did not intend to make their teachings too explicit. But knowing the threat to teachings such as Taoism and Buddhism - owing to the social climate in China, Lu K'uan Yu endeavored to make them available to Western people.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By James on September 16, 2005
Format: Paperback
The I Ching is considered by many a guide book for life. The book contains a sequence of 64 "hexagrams." Each hexagram is accompanied by an explanation of its meaning and sayings for each of it's 6 lines. Also, each of the hexagrams in this translation includes commentary composed by the Taoist adept Liu I-ming in 1796.
The book can be read in many ways, for example; reading one or two of the hexagrams a day. This is the type of book that is better taken in bits as opposed to being read in long sections.
Over all I am pleased with Mr. Clearys translation of the I-ching and found his introduction to be helpful. The only other version that I have read is Brian Walkers version.
I think it would be helpful if the reader was a little familiar with Taoist or
any form of meditation before reading this book. I think that even a little experience with meditation would go a long way in helping the reader grasp the point of the book. That said, I think that if you are interested you should go for it. Enjoy
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 7, 1998
Format: Paperback
The Taoist I Ching, translated by Thomas Cleary, was written by Liu I-Ming in the eighteenth century. It is an application of Taoist energetics to the 64 hexagrams and 384 lines of the I Ching. When used as a tool for self-cultivation, this work can aid the practitioner in an immediate understanding of the requirements that given energy formations place on one's daily life.
If you are a serious student of the I Ching, seeking insight into the subtle operation of yin and yang, this text can aid in your search for understanding by illuminating a pathway through a given situation to balance and harmony. It is less of a divination oracle than many I Ching texts, but is one of the most applicable to engaged daily cultivation.
The Taoist I Ching may seem a little wierd to use at first (it's definately different!) but has proven to be wholly rewarding in my life. Use it in conjunction with another translation - look for the commonality between the two - and gain the understanding that Master Liu encrypted within the pages.
Ancestor Lu, the immortal Lu T'ung Pin, wrote of the I Ching in the ninth century " The shallow may take the I Ching to be a book of divination, but the profound consider it the secret of the celestial mechanism." Liu I-Ming's "Taoist I Ching" is most certainly a rendering of Ancestor Lu's vision. Thomas Cleary's gifted translation of this work must certainly echo his virtue all the way to the Subtle Origin.
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