Buy New
$15.39
Qty:1
  • List Price: $22.50
  • Save: $7.11 (32%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 18? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Trade in your item
Get a $2.00
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

The Taste of Blood: Spirit Possession in Brazilian Candomble (Contemporary Ethnography) Paperback

ISBN-13: 978-0812213416 ISBN-10: 0812213416 Edition: 0th

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.39
$15.00 $9.86

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Frequently Bought Together

The Taste of Blood: Spirit Possession in Brazilian Candomble (Contemporary Ethnography) + Gender's Place: Feminist Anthropologies of Latin America
Price for both: $52.29

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Series: Contemporary Ethnography
  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press (May 1, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812213416
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812213416
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 5.9 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #283,925 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"An excellent story, rich in ethnographic material, untraditional in form, courageous in personal revelations, and with definite qualities in the attempts to guide the reader through insights, recognitions, and increasing understanding, without hiding the researcher's own confusion and doubts. It gives us more than a slight glance into the fascinating, earthly, puzzling, and still too little known world of Brazilian Candomble."—Ethnos.



"Well written and rich in ethnographic detail, the book makes an engaging story with sometimes touching accounts of personal experiences with fellow initiates who have "tasted the blood" of a religion that traces its roots to Africa and Brazilian folk traditions."—Society of Lesbian and Gay Anthropologists Newsletter



"A narrative full of almost novelistic devices, attempting to evoke the full reality of this complex, unknown, exciting and somewhat frightening way, or concept, of life."—British Bulletin of Publications



"Succeeds as an innovative ethnography. . . . Intriguing and scintillating . . . The Taste of Blood brilliantly explores both Condomble and the representations of ethnographic research."—Folklore Forum

About the Author

Jim Wafer works as a consultant anthropologist in Central Australia.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
0
3 star
3
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
In his book, Jim Wafer explores not only Candomble from an anthropological standpoint, but from his very personal experience in Bahia, Brazil. Wafer skillfully weaves academic arguments with an enjoyable narration, which keeps the reader invested in his account on many levels. Wafer structures his book, appropriately, on the different Candomble spirits, and so his journey in the book leads the reader not only through his experience as an outsider but the experience of the Candomble ceremony as well, first calling the exus, then the caboclos, then the orixa. Wafer also manages to hit on key issues within Candomble: gender relations, sexual orientation, "Africanness" and racialization, class, etc. My only complaint is that Wafer does not explore these aspects of life in Bahia and Candomble enough. Despite a somewhat sensational title and a final chapter that seems to be out of place in Wafer's personal account, this book is solid, and I recommend it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Joseph Morales on September 21, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A trained anthropologist, Jim Wafer spent a year in Brazil researching Candomble for his doctorate. The result is a thought-provoking but often difficult and sometimes frustrating account. He alternates between narrative passages where he describes people he met and things he observed, and other analytical passages where he discusses theories of anthropology. Those theoretical passages are particularly dense, and leave one wondering whether specialists only seem to write obscurely because they assume so much expertise, or whether it is actually important for them to write obscurely in order to establish their insider status to other specialists. The narrative passages bring to light many aspects of Candomble that have not appeared in more popular accounts of Afro-Brazilian religion. Wafer focuses on the Exus and Caboclos, the least exalted of the Cadomble pantheon, and shows that their possessions often come outside of any ritual context. He also suggests that the personalities of the medium and those of the possessing "entity" are not entirely distinct, but tend to blur together. And he gives much valuable insight into the personality and political conflicts that go on in a terreiro. You could say he's giving the least flattering view of Candomble, in which neurotic and self-centered people use a complex religion as a semi-successful coping mechanism in their lives. What is missing is any vivid sense of the transcendant mood of the experience, or the joyful energy so evident in Candomble and Umbanda recordings. Wafer seems often to feel guilty or depressed by his status as a pretend-devotee, given unusual attention by a leader who hopes to exploit this foreign intellectual for publicity.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
is how you should take this text. It's a great first hand account of one man's very specific experience in one terreiro (that seems equal parts Umbanda & Candomble) during a very specific time. Being that it's one of the few books in English about Candomble, folks interested in Candomble tend to flock to it. Be careful, because this isn't a book about Candomble in general and your experiences are likely to be different than his own. He also goes into great detail about things that happen to him while he's in ritual, and that could ruin your own experience if you hope to have one.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search
ARRAY(0xa3d29894)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?