The Tattooed Girl and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
  • List Price: $14.99
  • Save: $8.99 (60%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Book may have moderate creases and wear from reading. Item qualifies for ** FREE ** shipping and Amazon Prime programs!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Tattooed Girl: The Enigma of Stieg Larsson and the Secrets Behind the Most Compelling Thrillers of Our Time Paperback – Bargain Price, May 10, 2011


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, Bargain Price
"Please retry"
$6.00
$4.50 $1.52

This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but could include a small mark from the publisher and an Amazon.com price sticker identifying them as such. Details



Frequently Bought Together

The Tattooed Girl: The Enigma of Stieg Larsson and the Secrets Behind the Most Compelling Thrillers of Our Time + "There Are Things I Want You to Know" about Stieg Larsson and Me + The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest: Book 3 of the Millennium Trilogy (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard)
Price for all three: $21.57

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The Bone Clocks
David Mitchell's hypnotic new novel crackles with invention and sheer storytelling pleasure. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin (May 10, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312610564
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312610562
  • ASIN: B006LWE1RO
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.5 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,368,661 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Dan Burstein is an award-winning journalist and author of thirteen prior books. He and Arne de Keijzer are the cocreators of the Secrets series, which includes the bestseller Secrets of the Code.

 

John-Henri Holmberg is a nonfiction writer, translator, and editor. He met Stieg Larsson in 1972, and over the years they became good friends. Before Stieg Larsson’s untimely death, he shared with Holmberg tantalizing details about the new book he was working on.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

 
PART ONE
THE MAN WHO CONQUERED THE WORLD
With all my defenses as a reader and critic leveled by the hurricane force of his story, I just spent a few weeks reading Stieg Larsson’s Millennium trilogy. It left me with the happiness and excitement of febrile children and adolescents who read the series on the Musketeers by Dumas or the novels of Dickens and Victor Hugo, wondering at every turn of the page “What now, what will happen?” and the foreboding anguish of knowing that the story was going to end soon.
—Mario Vargas Llosa, 2010 Nobel Prize winner for literature

 
Like everyone, I’m reading the Stieg Larsson trilogy. I’m addicted. We’re in glorious Santa Barbara, but I don’t want to leave the house, or fall asleep at night so caught up in the web of books am I.
—Lesley Stahl, 60 Minutes

 
The political honesty, the rage at sexism, the suspense, the overpowering narrative, the focus on modern sexual mores, the sexual tension between Mikael and Lisbeth have made the Millennium trilogy not only a runaway commercial success but perhaps the best, most broadly focused examination of modern politics in popular fiction. To have written these three novels may have killed Larsson, but he left a monument behind, a modern masterpiece.
—Patrick Anderson, The Washington Post
1. THE AUTHOR WHO KICKED THE HORNET’S NEST
THE PROFOUND PRESCIENCE OF STIEG LARSSON
by Dan Burstein
Most recent crime novels don’t call out to be read a second time for at least a few years, if ever. But in the case of the Millennium trilogy, I couldn’t wait. There’s so much in Stieg Larsson’s books that, like a good film you immediately want to see again, and in which you “see so much more” the second time around, they proved even more interesting to me on the second read than they were when I rushed through them the first time, compelled along by the plot, the perils, and the cliffhangers. Taking The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played with Fire, and The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest together as the single whole trilogy that they compose, you can see that just below the surface of potboiler action there lie deep veins of Stieg Larsson’s cosmology. Lisbeth and Blomkvist walk the streets of Stockholm engaged in the plot of the book, while just beneath them, like the city’s vast tunnelbana metro system, Larsson elaborates, argues, and explores his social, political, moral, technological, economic, and psychological themes. His early-twenty-first-century critique of the world as we know it, as well as his vision for changing it, is interlaced with his plot. His worldview is there to reflect on, debate, and learn from—or not—at the reader’s discretion (although it occasionally surfaces in the reader’s face with a little too much didacticism). The best reviews of the Millennium trilogy highlight the breadth of Larsson’s vision. Writing in the Washington Post in May 2010, just after the publication of Hornet’s Nest, Patrick Anderson wondered out loud how these books, by an obscure and now deceased Swedish writer, who had never published much fiction before, came to capture the attention of the world. Arguing that, “The trilogy ranks among those novels that expand the horizons of popular fiction,” Anderson offered several reasons for the author’s posthumous success:

The most obvious is the brilliance of Larsson’s narrative. It’s a rich, exciting, suspenseful story, with a huge cast, and involves us deeply in Lisbeth’s fate, even as it carries us into all levels of Swedish society.
Another reason for the trilogy’s success is its political message. There are neo-Nazis, criminals and corporate villains in these books, but finally the enemy is corrupt government officials who wage war not only on individuals but on democracy itself. Readers throughout the world have recognized that rogue elements of government do operate in secret. To some degree, Larsson based his plot on real scandals in his own country, but the dangers he exposes are universal … .

The third reason, Anderson hypothesized, is the passionate attack on sexism.

All this—the political honesty, the rage at sexism, the suspense, the overpowering narrative, the focus on modern sexual mores, the sexual tension between Mikael and Lisbeth—has made the Millennium trilogy … not only a runaway commercial success but perhaps the best, most broadly focused examination of modern politics in popular fiction (emphasis added) … . To have written these three novels may have killed Larsson, but he left a monument behind, a modern masterpiece.

Like a twenty-first-century version of the best Norse sagas, Larsson’s tales are infinitely complex and feature a multiplicity of characters, plots, and subplots. Indeed, a family tree of the fictional Vanger family (worthy of a reader’s guide to a Tolstoy novel) is depicted in Tattoo to help keep all the players straight. But in addition to their plots, subplots, and clever mixture of crime and thriller genres, the books also tackle many real-world themes. Here are some of the most important ones.
Men Who Hate Women
Stieg Larsson’s stated intention was to call all three books Men Who Hate Women and then give each volume of the trilogy a relevant subtitle. As we know from published correspondence, Norstedts, the Swedish publisher, lobbied him to change this title, but he was insistent on it. In fact, he told his editors in essence that they could change many things about the books in editing, but not the title. The first book was published in Sweden accordingly. But the U.K. publisher who acquired the English-language publication rights after Larsson’s death (MacLehose/Quercus) changed the title to The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. In doing so, they made a brilliant commercial decision. But at the same time undercut the key statement the author was trying to make.
Larsson is often described as a feminist; Eva Gabrielsson, his partner in life, said he described himself that way ever since she first met him as a teenager in the early 1970s. But his feminism was a different, more political, and more passionate feminism than what most readers would think of as a modern male who calls himself a feminist. In the first place, he dared to paint a detailed, thorough, and hyperrealistic picture of the pervasiveness of violence, abuse, rape, and murder of women. He attacked Sweden’s sacred cow of its self-image and its complacent pride in its gender-equalizing achievements. Yes, almost half the Parliament is female and yes, huge progress has been made in empowering women over the last several decades. But Larsson refused to accept the general progress in society as a reason not to excoriate that society’s deficiencies. He tracked numerous cases of women beaten, brutalized, raped, murdered, and systematically denied their rights and the protection of the state even in genteel Sweden. Several well-known real-life cases are mirrored in the plots of his books.
We don’t know what Stieg Larsson would have thought if he had lived to learn about Göran Lindberg, but let’s just say when I read about this case in the summer of 2010, I thought I had fallen headfirst into a Larsson novel. Tragically, it was a true story. A former police chief and director of the Swedish National Police Academy, Lindberg presented himself as the consummate supporter of female members of the police force. He lectured and convened workshops designed to raise male policemen’s consciousness about working with their female partners, prevent sexual harassment, and make it easier for women to progress through police ranks. But when he was arrested in 2010, it was reported that even while he had been acting as such an enlightened figure, he had been a serial rapist (including raping a seventeen-year-old girl) and had been involved in procuring, prostitution, and various kinds of dehumanizing sexual acts with numerous women.
Larsson wanted us to “get it” that people like Lindberg are not all that unusual in our cultures. The amount of abuse and violence that takes place is much greater than what is reported; the conviction percentages for the crimes that are reported are way too low; and the jail sentences are way too short and trivial. There was no condescension or do-gooding in Larsson’s approach to feminism. He wanted readers to be uncomfortable. He wanted us to experience, even for just a brief moment, the brutalization and suffering faced by women who are violated and abused.
Stieg Larsson wanted to challenge us: how often do we see a horrific, gruesome story on TV about a serial rapist or killer, about a girl held hostage for years, about the operations of a sex-trafficking ring? Why don’t we connect the dots? Our culture becomes fascinated with tawdry tabloid stories about famous and powerful men who become involved with prostitutes and seamy relationships, or who abuse the women they live with. Whether it’s Elliot Spitzer, Tiger Woods, Mel Gibson, Senator David Vitter, Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, or O. J. Simpson, we profess shock and decry the specific incidents, but we don’t face up to the pattern.
While I was researching this book, I came across a New York Times report on sex trafficking in the middle of Manhattan. “Americans tend to associate ‘modern slavery’ with illiterate girls in India or Cambodia. Yet there I was the other day, interviewing a college graduate who says she spent three years t...

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Margie Read VINE VOICE on May 28, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a collection of many comments, essays, and articles about Stieg Larsson and his trilogy which has been so popular over the world. Readers who enjoyed The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl who Played with Fire, and The Girl who Kicked the Hornet's Nest will find a lot of information about the author and the events which have happened since his untimely death just before the trilogy was published. What a shame this brilliant writer is gone from the literary scent. How sad he did not live to see his fame blossom. How ironic his long time live in girl friend of thirty years is being subjected to so much anguish by his father and brother who suddenly return to the scene when the million dollar estate is involved. Sweden needs a common law marriage law.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Jack Ruskin on May 27, 2011
Format: Paperback
I enjoyed both the original books and the Swedish movies of the books. Yet, they are very different. The books are complex and very thought-provoking. A film has to simplify, but adds a visual appeal. Some people do not like to read the book AND watch the film. A commentary like this adds yet another perspective. It is valuable to those who really want to know the "back-story" of the books. It is not meant to replicate anything about the books, yet to add a perspective, which it does well. It is enjoyable, and can be read in chunks. If you hunger to know the minutiae of the book (which I did), then this book will enrich your enjoyment of the books.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Happy Reader on May 29, 2011
Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed reading this book and getting deeper into the issues presented in Stieg Larsson's book series. Thoughtful and timely, I was surprised by the various facets of Larsson works and how they reflect a very different Sweden than what I pictured. I also learned about some connections that I never ever imagined, such as the influence of Pippi Longstocking on the character of Lisbeth. I don't want to give away too much - read the book for yourself and have fun.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By SaCha1689 on February 25, 2012
Format: Paperback
Love it or hate it, Stieg Larsson's Millennium series has a ubiquitous presence not only in pop culture but also in political theory, feminist theory and Swedish tourism, as illustrated by The Tattooed Girl: The Enigma of Stieg Larsson and the Secrets Behind the Most Compelling Thrillers of Our Time. Complied by Dan Burstein, Arne de Keijzer and Larsson's friend and colleague John-Henri Holmberg, this ought to be required reading for fans of the series, as it not only provides trivia behind the publication and translation of the three novels; it also explores in depth the social and political context in which they were written.

Made up of essays and critical evaluations, the book is divided into four parts: "The Man Who Conquered the World," about Larsson himself; "The Climate is Cold, the Nights are Long, the Liquor is Hard and the Curtains are Drawn," which is about the history of Scandinavian crime noir and its integration into Western markets; "How Stig Became Stieg: An Intimate Portrait," which details significant events of Larsson's life, including his changing his name; and "The Millennium Files," which summarizes various themes and motifs within the series and concludes the book with a timeline of Larsson's life and career. The many contributing authors are journalists, feminists, book critics, editors, interviewers, and close friends of Larsson, covering a wide range of contextual material within scholarly and philosophical treatises.

Several essays reveal Larsson's lifelong love of science fiction, and one provides summaries of his earlier writings: short stories published in sci-fi magazines long before the Millennium trilogy came into being.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tami Popoff on December 11, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
WOW really puts all three books The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and others in to prospective and wish there were more books to read by Stieg Larsson.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search