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The Templar Salvation Hardcover – October 19, 2010

106 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Khoury's entertaining sequel to The Last Templar (2006) offers characters and plot lines that hew closely to the conventions of the religious thriller subgenre. In 1310, Templar knight Conrad of Tripoli stumbled on a trove of writings documenting the early days and divisions of Christianity. The Catholic Church has kept this material hidden since the fall of Constantinople in 1453, fearful that its release would undermine the church's authority and rock the foundations of Christian belief. In the present, Mansoor Zahed, an Iranian motivated by revenge for the CIA killing of his family in the 1950s, is bent on finding the trove and releasing it to undermine Western religion and stability. Meanwhile, FBI special agent Sean Reilly visits the Vatican on a quest to find a document that may help in his effort to rescue his love interest, Tess Chaykin, who's been kidnapped. The constant suspense, ever-mounting body count, and interesting historical lore will keep readers turning the pages.
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From Booklist

Khoury’s follow-up to his very popular The Last Templar (2006) begins in the year 1203. Constantinople is under siege; a small band of Knights Templars has snuck into the city and stolen valuable documents from the imperial library. After taking refuge in a monastery, the Templars are murdered, never having learned the contents of the documents. In the present day, an Iranian history professor is given an ultimatum: finish his work on a certain historical artifact, or his family will be killed. Meanwhile, FBI agent Sean Reilly—star of The Last Templar—is compelled to smuggle ancient documents out of the Vatican archives if he wants to see his lover, Tess, again. Are these the same documents we saw in the book’s opening scene? What is their import? Are Tess’ abduction and the threats against the historian’s family connected? Khoury answers these questions and a handful more in this very well constructed blend of historical mystery and present-day thriller. He doesn’t break any new ground, but there’s no denying he’s got the storytelling chops and the imagination to spin an exciting yarn. Fans of his earlier novels, especially this one’s predecessor, will eat this one up. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Khoury may be the best of the Da Vinci Code imitators, and the Templars continue to draw a crowd. --David Pitt
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Dutton Adult; First Edition edition (October 19, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0525951849
  • ISBN-13: 978-0525951841
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 1.4 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (106 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #811,017 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

I was born in Beirut, a Scorpio and the youngest of three. The civil war broke out there when I was 14 and my parents, in a noble effort to keep us alive into adulthood, wisely moved us to Rye, NY. I stayed there until I graduated from Rye Country Day School, then, intent on thwarting my parents' nurturing instincts, I decided to go back to Lebanon to study architecture at the American University of Beirut. Which, in hindsight, wasn't as nutty a decision as you might think. Those years, marred by repeated flare-ups of fighting and a couple of invasions, were emotionally taxing, harrowing, sometimes dangerous, often maddeningly frustrating, but always intense in the most visceral sense of the word and, weirdly enough, I wouldn't have missed them for the world. Maybe that's the Scorpio in me...

So there I was, gingerly studying architecture in the hopes of one day helping rebuild the city (rumours that a local cabal of intensely purist architects was having ugly buildings selectively blown up remain unproven). The civil war erupted again a few weeks after I graduated, and I was evacuated out from the beach down the road from our apartment on a sunny but sad day in February, 1984, by the Marine Corp's 22nd Amphibious Unit on board a Chinook helicopter, to whom I'll be eternally grateful (the Marines, not the chopper).

I ended up in London, where I joined a small architecture practice. The architecture scene in Europe was pretty bleak at that time, so I decided to explore other career options. I got an MBA at INSEAD in Fontainebleau, France, and joined an investment bank, selling gold-linked convertibles and other far less exotic financial instruments, surrounded by Gekko wannabes and hating waking up every day. In fairness, I have to credit those 'wilderness' years with one wonderful thing: meeting my gorgeous wife, who tolerated my exhausting yearnings for something more fulfilling and eventually gave me two incredible daughters.

I left the glamorous (at the time, anyway) world of investment banking after three years to return to my creative roots. I bounced around for a while, trying different things, and during a business trip to the Bahamas (don't ask), I met a banker who dabbled in the film business. I've always been a film geek and harbored a burning desire to make movies, so at dinner one night, I bounced an idea off him, and the idea struck a chord. I had a new partner, and we agreed to develop my idea into a screenplay -- by hiring a professional screenwriter he'd worked with.

Several conference calls later, the outlines coming back from Los Angeles weren't what I had in mind. I offered to write an outline myself. When I faxed my notes to my partner (yes, this was in the early 90s, long before email), he called me up and said, "Our man in L.A. isn't going to write this movie for us. You are. You're a writer."

So I did. And it got shortlisted for the Fulbright Fellowship in Screenwriting award, which I had to apply for under a friend's name (I wasn't eligible, but that's another long story). My next script, a semi-autobiographical screenplay about my college years during the war, was also nominated for the award a year later. Then the next year, in 1995, I optioned the film rights to Melvyn Bragg's novel, THE MAID OF BUTTERMERE and wrote the adaptation myself while completing an original screenplay called... THE LAST TEMPLAR. Buttermere found its way to Robert DeNiro, who announced in Variety that he would be producing it and playing the lead. The Last Templar... well, if you're reading this, you know that after ten years or so, it managed the quantum leap off my laptop's hard drive and into novel form, but that's a longer story, one I'll go through in a separate post...

Since then, and after working as a screenwriter and a producer on shows like the BBC series Spooks, (MI-5 in the US), I'm now solely focused on the novels, the fifth of which is THE DEVIL'S ELIXIR.

And that's about it... Thanks for taking the time to explore my ramblings, and if you do pick up one of my books, I hope you have a blast reading it. And let me know-connect with me on facebook on my Official Fan Page (and NOT on one of the others that I don't manage!). Enjoy!

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

48 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Eric M. Chandler on October 22, 2010
Format: Hardcover
We (my wife & I) have enjoyed all of Raymond Khoury's books and looked forward to the sequel to "The Last Templar". (Fortunately there was the movie version of that book to bridge the gap while awaiting the sequel.) Now, using the historical framework of the Catholic Church and it's turbulent relationship with the Knights Templar and it's affects when put on a collision course with our modern geopolitical condition, "The Templar Salvation" does not disappoint. Well and tightly crafted, heroes drawing on their last reserves and a really villainous villain are just some of the components that kept our eyes running across the pages. A great story and a truly worthy sequel to the "The Last Templar".
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By OH Buyer on June 9, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This was a major disappointment. Combine the most incompetent FBI agent in history (makes every mistake conceivable - how does he keep his job?), the most evil middle eastern terrorist imaginable (think of an evil act - he will do it), a fairly wooden heroine and various rambling diatribes regarding US policy, religion, etc. and you have this book. The plot is 100% predictable, as are the next acts of the hapless hero and vile villain. I found myself guessing what would come next and was never wrong. This was, however, a way to pass the time until I managed to wade through to the entirely predictable ending. (If you read the last book you know what's coming.) There are a variety of tangential speeches regarding the above noted issues of such length that one forgets what the underlying plot line is. The action sequences evoke emotion, but again are 100% predictable at all turns.

If you have read the author's prior renderings or have any imagination whatsoever, this book will hold little for you.
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22 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Jerry Marcus on October 20, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Once again, Koury's imagination and talent as a storyteller takes readers on a journey that is suspenseful, and also challenges one to reflect about the past and contemporary times. One more book in a series that seems to be getting better and better. (Reviewer is the author of "The Last Pope: A Novel" and "The Salvation Peddler.")
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By morton on July 29, 2011
Format: Paperback
Faces "cloud with confusion" over and over again in this book; actually, I think it was the author who was confused. So cliche to use this phrase even once, much less in every chapter.

Redundancies abound and there's just too many to list. These are the funnier ones:
- "Her beaming grin was in full tractor-beam mode."
- He "shook his head with disbelief. "You're unbelievable" (What's unbelievable is that he would use similar words twice in one sentence!)
- "a ruggedly handsome man with shoulder-length, wavy hair and probing eyes. A young, ruggedly handsome man."

The characters clamber up walls, clamber on board, clamber across, clamber, clamber, clamber, over and over again. Please get a thesaurus!

Note there is an intimate storyline about two people who cohabitate without being married, in case you care about stuff like that.

I bought this in an airport because it seemed like a quick-paced, plot driven mystery. I was stuck with it at 30,000 feet, but when I landed (page 179) I threw it away.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By J. Blewett on March 25, 2012
Format: Paperback
My apologies to turkeys. Definitely the most incompetent FBI agent in fiction. He was reckless and always boiling with fury at the sight or even the thought of the arch Iranian villain. His sweetie Tess was a wonder woman who was like the Energizer Bunny and kept on moving and talking about history long after she should have collapsed from exhaustion, dehydration or shock. Ever notice these characters never need to hydrate, eat, sleep or pee? I had already thought the book was a joke but was curious to see what the Big Secret Trove was about. During the first flashback to the Templar knight, whose name I already forgot, I noticed that the knight had a prickling of fear that he was in danger. In fact a "siren went off in his head." Not a Siren song, as he was on land but a siren. Like a tornado siren maybe. It's called an anachronism Ray. There were colloquilisms that were out of place in the thought processes of the Iranian such as, "time to vamoose," and "put the kibosh on." Seriously! I almost dropped the book when inept agent Reilly was somewhere in the process of fighting for his life on the plane when "my bad" dropped into a paragraph. Augh!

Khoury couldn't even provide a name or description of the Kurdish woman who had saved the ancient texts. She was just referred to as "the old woman." She was a significant character who also seemed to speak correct idiomatic English. Ray, you are such a jerk! Maybe you should say My bad!
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Ana the Reader on December 2, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Sorry to say but I was disappointed in the Characters behaviors. The bad guy seemed invincible. He killed so many people and no one seemed smart enough to catch him. I can't believe he kills a bunch of commandos and there wasn't a hugh army after this guy. Only Reilly, one lone FBI agent seems to be going after this guy and even he misses killing him by not shooting him because he is too busy over thinking whether he should shoot him or not. Give me a break. The history itself was interesting. The characters were a big disappointment. I really felt the book was going on forever. The interesting historical facts are not enough for me to recommend this book. Sorry but if the next book has these same characters; I am just not interested.
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