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28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
on November 11, 2005
Many times truth is far more fantastic than fiction. Such is the case of the history and speculation found within the covers of "The Templars' Secret Island". The tale is that of the 12th century confederacy of Templar Grand Master Bertrand de Blanchefort, Bernard of Clairvaux, and a Danish bishop to maintain a fabulous secret. Authors Erling Haagensen and Henry Lincoln compellingly write of their ten year study leading to the "re-discovery" of "secrets which it would once have been perilous - even fatal - to disclose", and "uncover an advanced wisdom and insight into nature and its laws which go far beyond anything we have, thus far, believed to be in the possession of our forefathers".

Templar culture enthusiasts already know of Berenger Sauniere who found four parchments in a pillar of his church in 1891. Haagensen and Lincoln explore the meaning of the geometric forms revealed in that parchment. They realize that the pattern is the same as the structuring of the landscape around the village of Rennes-le-Chateau.

They also explore in great detail the fifteen stone churches of the island of Bornholm, a small island in the Baltic Sea, and their relationship to Rennes-le-Chateau, and to the tunnels beneath Mount Sion in Jerusalem. Nowhere outside of Jerusalem is there such a density of churches of the specific architecture found on Bornholm. Why? Evidence suggests that the edifices were not merely places of worship, but likely had a defensive, military purpose.

Numerology, geometry, astronomy, hermeticism, papal intrigue, and Marion Conspiracy theories: (Oh my!). The authors explore all of these in the context of this small Danish island, and conclude that Bornholm "was laid out with absolute precision as a teaching aid...unknown, remote, unlikely to be disturbed, not rich enough or big enough to attract any errant warrior intent on carving out a kingdom". What were they protecting? Scientific knowledge? Alchemy? The Ark of the Covenant? " A combination of religion and of a science which would have been viewed as heresy in the Middle Ages"?

This academic, archeologic, architectural and mathematical journey spans Europe and the Middle East, and is awesomely mesmerizing and complex. It makes The DaVinci Code read like childs play.
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on May 16, 2006
The DaVinci Code spurred my interest in this subject, and seeing a book titled The Templars' Secret Island; how could I not pick it up? While this book does deliver what it promises, it makes you work the entire way. If you're expecting a mystical tale of an enchanted secret island, this isn't it. The first four chapters are a dry, thorough history of the Baltic, then the fun starts: the geometry and positioning of the churches, which IS quite exciting, but it's presented again in a rather dry, technical way. Pretty good photographs, drawings, and maps do bring a bit more life to the story, but in my opinion it could have been twice as long, and better described the driving factors of events in a more human way rather than just chaining events together. Not to say the author didn't do a fantasic job researching the topic and recording his findings. Ultimately, I'd love to see a Discovery Channel special on this topic. :o)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on June 20, 2012
When I first picked up this book at a sale, I couldn't make much sense of it - most of the geometry was baffling and I wasn't very familiar with the history, so it went onto the bookshelf.

Several years later, after filling in some gaps in my sorry education, I picked it up again and wow - what a great story! The authors alternate chapters on puzzling historical events with step by step descriptions of the creation of an amazing geometric design on the little Danish island of Bornholm. On the way, they throw in some surprising facts on units of measure, the building of cathedrals, and explorations under Jerusalem, all tied up with their speculation about what lies at the heart of all of these efforts.

The book is nicely designed and readable, with lots of color photos and clear diagrams. Highly recommended, along with John Michell's "How the World is Made" on sacred geometry.
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10 of 14 people found the following review helpful
The work describes medieval links of Scandinavia, France and Jerusalem. The author declares that the "wise man affirms nothing he cannot prove" . The volume attempts to explain the uniqueness of Bornholm churches in all of Denmark by reference to the worship of Christ and military applications/uses. The theory of magical art consists of the gotham circle, sides, diagonals, squares and circumference. The author believes that human knowledge cannot be lost once acquired. The presentation of Olsker and Vestermarie encompasses the image of the Star of David. Theoretical coordinates within 45 Bornholm are set forth mathematically. Hypothesis is likened to the poetry of science. This work is highly theoretical with a language and tradition of its own.
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on February 16, 2014
For those of you wondering how the Knights Templar got to the Baltic, this book is a must read. Although it is very well written and easy to read the geometry will be difficult for many, remembering my geometry class in which 80% of the class failed. The first half of the book describes the history between Burgundy, France and Denmark. Authors dwell on notable characters during the late 11th and the 12th Century with a historically ignored 35 year Baltic Crusade against the Estonian pagan, Wends, commencing in 1171 by the church.

The book is divided into four unequaled parts of facts, beliefs, proofs, and calculations which must be read in order from front to back to understand the points being introduced. The non mathematical minded reader may find Part III confusing, however, I recommend re-reading it several times to obtain understanding.

Bottom-line: authors reveal that like the natural pentacle of mountains found by David Wood in the Languedoc a similar man-made pentacle can be found on the Island of Bornholm by the construction of churches in the 12th century. This same pentacle with “The Golden Section” can also be found in Washington DC in the geometric design of the city . I have a strange feeling one of the pentacle points in all three locations project to Jerusalem. Additionally, the map on page 137 shows the equal distance from Rennes-le-chateau and Bornholm to Jerusalem in the form of an isosceles triangle.

The Cistercians and Templars are implicated in the Languedoc and Bornholm due to the above historical accounting. On page 134 the authors have outlined a tenuous line of connection through time to explain their hypothesis.

Two items that confuse me is in the middle of page 44 authors spend time indicating that the 30 degree angle between the four round churches provides the introduction to a “6 pointed star” when this star is defined as two equilateral triangles in opposite orientation with all the angles 60 degrees. Finally, their finding of 1/9 degree (0.00193925472 Rad) angle as a brilliant feat is not significant to me practically. I guess I am mathematically untutored.
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on January 14, 2015
If you have read and enjoyed some of Henry Lincoln's other books regarding the mysteries of Rennes le Chateau (a small village in the south of France) then you will find this book to be very interesting. It investigates similar geographic-geometric mysteries on a small island in the Baltic Sea, revealing that someone, presumably the Knights Templar, had an astonishingly high degree of mathematical/geometric knowledge back in the Middle Ages, which they presumably discovered in Jerusalem during the Crusades. My knowledge of geometry is so-so, but I found it easy enough to follow, and enjoyed every page of it.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on October 14, 2012
Really enjoyed seeing how the secret skills were used to signal treasure hidden, also the secret of English measures.
J
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on January 23, 2015
Round houses? Read about the significance of these shapes of homes and the mystery attached to them.
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8 of 17 people found the following review helpful
on January 15, 2006
This book was very marginal at best. I understand the premise but the writing method to get there makes you play on one gues, based on another guess, based on another guess, and then in the middle of it they say, but we will explain that later. By the time they explain it, you have forget the fact or the reason you needed to know.

not something something I would pick up for entertainment
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