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The Temple and the Church's Mission: A Biblical Theology of the Dwelling Place of God (New Studies in Biblical Theology) Paperback – September 17, 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 458 pages
  • Publisher: IVP Academic (September 17, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0830826181
  • ISBN-13: 978-0830826186
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1.3 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #75,303 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"The importance of this book lies not only in the competent handling of its chosen theme but in three other things: its evocative unpacking of the theme of the temple and its relations to broader structures of thought, including the kingdom of God; its modeling of the way biblical theology is to be done; and its capacity to cause readers to perceive fresh and wonderful things in the Scriptures, and to bow in worship and gratitude." (D. A. Carson)

About the Author

G. K. Beale (PhD, University of Cambridge) holds the J. Gresham Machen Chair of New Testament and is professor of New Testament and biblical theology at Westminster Theological Seminary. His books include The Book of Revelation (New International Greek Testament Commentary), 1-2 Thessalonians (The IVP New Testament Commentary Series), The Right Doctrine from the Wrong Texts? Essays on the Use of the Old Testament in the New, John's Use of the Old Testament in Revelation, The Temple and the Church's Mission and We Become What We Worship.

More About the Author

G. K. Beale is professor of New Testament and Biblical Theology at Westminster Theological Seminary. In recent years he has served as President and as a member of the executive committee of the Evangelical Theological Society. He has written several books and articles on biblical studies and was the editor of Right Doctrine from Wrong Texts?

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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See all 21 customer reviews
This book is brilliant.
J. Butter
G.K. Beale is Professor of New Testament and Biblical Theology at Westminster Theological Seminary.
Jacob Sweeney
Weighing in at just over 400 pages, this book is a massive tome.
D. Wang

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

48 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Erin J. on May 30, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a much needed study of the Church's mission through a thorough examination of the Temple and its meaning. Beale, starts by saying that the Garden of Eden was a Garden Temple that was meant to spread out into all the world and humanity was to govern and keep the garden Temple. He makes a good case for this actually. He believes that other Temples, in pagan traditions, had elements of this truth in their Temples, but they had taken the original truth and distorted it. The Hebrews, under Abraham and later Moses, Solomon, and the Second Temple were to build the Temple and worship God and the world was to be blessed through this Temple. Beale, rightly, see's Jesus as the true Temple and the former Temples as models of that which was to come in Jesus. Beale makes the case that Jesus is the true Temple and the Church, by virtue of faith in Jesus are a part of the true Temple. At the second coming, the Temple will be completed as the glory of the Lord covers the whole earth. Beale, is able to give much support for his views and does not build straw men to support his positons. There is a chapter on the Temple and the man of lawlessness in 2 Thessalonians in which he defends the Temple as the Church and not a future Temple to be physically built in Jerusalem (conta dispensationalisms typical view). He also deals extensively with Ezekiel 40-48 and shows that not only does the New Testament writers (especailly John the Revelator) see Ezekiel as being fulfilled in the Church spreading throughout the world, but that Ezekiel had this kind of thing in mind himself. Also, worthy of note, for Pentecostal's such as myself, he has done some excellent research on 'tongues of fire' and their meaning that make this book well worth reading. Beale's work should not be ignored. It is comprehensive and well argued. One final note, the book is 402 pages and is not very expensive. It is worth more than they are charging. Get it, it is worth it.
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47 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Jacob on November 15, 2005
Format: Paperback
Beale has woven together many facets of biblical theology and presented the church with the task of spreading God's glory throughout his creation.

Beale's thesis is "The old testament temples were symbolically designed to point to the future eschatological reality of God dwelling with his people" (25). Using this as his fulcrum Beale explores the cosmic symbolism of the temple in the OT, its uses, the coming *new* temple in the person of Christ, the temple-drama in Hebrews, and the consummating eschatological glory in Revelation.

Specifically Beale argues that with Christ the temple ceased to do its purpose (why have the shadow when the real is come?), and worse, it had become corrupted. Jesus identifies himself with the temple because he, not the temple, is the real bridge between God and man. Interestingly, when Christ died on the cross and the curtain was torn, there were stars on the curtain. This is symbolic of the cosmos (the old world order)and the inaguration of a new creation (189).

In the Book of Acts, the Temple (yet to be defined here), is contrasted with the Tower of Babel as anti-types. Part of God's curse on Babel was its refusal to spread God's glory throuhgout the earth. Secondly, Acts is an implementation of the work of the Gospels. More specifically, Pentecost is a divine theophany of the Heavenly Temple. Pentecost is a fulfillment of Joel's prophecy that nations are to be reoriented around Temple Worship.

He also surveys the New Temple in Paul's epistles, Hebrews, Revelation, and the practical implications thereof.
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30 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Stephen M. Anderson on June 17, 2008
Format: Paperback
Days before I graduated from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, Dr. Greg Beale, my student advisor and my professor of New Testament said, "Chip, you have a good grasp of theological and hermeneutical frameworks for understanding Scripture, I encourage you, now, to read authors who do the work of exegesis. Read, not how to do exegesis, but authors that do exegesis of texts." I have sought to do that for the last twenty-two years, whether I was in fulltime vocational ministry or in secular employment for personal study. Beale's book, The Temple and the Church's Mission, is a expert and great example of the work of exegesis, and as well, how such exegesis works into a Biblical Theology. This book is worth the read simply for the methodology it presents. The Temple and the Church's Mission is also a needed work on the nature of the Church, indeed a Biblical Theology of "Church" as well. Beale is a master exegete and harnesses that process to develop a Biblical Theology of God's ultimate plan in creating the Garden of Eden, the Temple, Jerusalem, and the Church. He makes the difficult exegetical process readable so the average pastor can wade through the material. His method should be imitated. As a Biblical Theology, The Temple and the Church's Mission utilizes the exegetical method to trace the progressive revelation from the Old Testament to the New and shows the implications on the nature of the Christian life and of the Church. Beale's conclusions should inform us regarding God's ultimate purpose, role, and mission of His Church. This book has an impact on the Christian community's view of its mission and purpose, and will lead to a wide range of practical considerations for the wise pastor and wise church leader.Read more ›
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