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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 700 page book that seems too short
Another excellent installment of the Commonwealth universe saga. There are really two universes in this book and different physics apply in each. The universe inside the "Void" leans towards fantasy, whereas the outside Commonwealth universe leans towards hard science fiction.

I do not like fantasy, however I did enjoyed the parts of the book that play inside...
Published on March 31, 2009 by A. Mayer

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Huge disappointment
What a let down from the wonderfully exciting, inventive, diverse and complex first book. Just the relationship of Araminta and the Boveys has more depth than this entire volume. Here her claim to fame is hiding in an appliance, and finding the Silfen paths. And the Dreams, rather than being the tantalizing bait that excites desire for the Pilgrimage, take over and crowd...
Published on June 10, 2010 by Dr. Jan


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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 700 page book that seems too short, March 31, 2009
By 
A. Mayer (Washington DC, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Temporal Void (Void Trilogy) (Hardcover)
Another excellent installment of the Commonwealth universe saga. There are really two universes in this book and different physics apply in each. The universe inside the "Void" leans towards fantasy, whereas the outside Commonwealth universe leans towards hard science fiction.

I do not like fantasy, however I did enjoyed the parts of the book that play inside the Void more. The reader knows that ultimately there will be an explanation for the way time and space behave inside the Void, and the fast paced story and well developed characters make it a joy to suspend disbelieve - for another 700 pages.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worth ordering from amazon.co.uk, November 12, 2008
By 
alg (Lochbuie, CO) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Temporal Void (Hardcover)
With the world becoming smaller it amazes me that there are not global release dates for more things. Since this book isn't due out in the US until Spring 09 I ordered from the UK site of Amazon.

If you like other books from Mr. Hamilton then you will love this book. The grand scope of most of his books is continued. The Waterwalker story is by far the most interesting part for me.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Story Continues, June 14, 2009
By 
This review is from: The Temporal Void (Void Trilogy) (Hardcover)
The Temporal Void (2009) is the second SF novel in the Void Trilogy, following The Dreaming Void. In the previous volume, the Accelerator Faction manipulated the Commonwealth to gain their own postphysical dream. Then a Second Dreamer arose and released new dreams of the Void into the gaiafield.

The Second Dreamer was not aware of her identity. Yet the Living Dream organization sought to use her to gain access to the Void. The Ocisen Empire sent a fleet toward the Commonwealth to prevent the Living Dream migration into the Void.

In this novel, Edeard is a constable in the city of Makkathran within the Void. He is known as Waterwalker for his telekinetic ability to support himself on a calm body of water. He is planning on removing the gangs from Makkathran.

Inigo is the Void Dreamer. He is also the founder of Living Dream. He had disappeared seventy years ago.

Ethan is the Cleric Conservator of the Living Dream organization. He has recently gained his post, primarily by declaring that Living Dream will soon migrate to the Void. He sends paramilitary troops to Viota to capture the Second Dreamer.

Aaron is a special operative for an unknown ANA faction. He is charged with finding Inigo and bringing him back. Aaron is only aware of his next options when he completes the previous stage of his task.

Corrie-Lyn was Inigo's lover. Since his disappearance, she served on the Living Dream Cleric Council. Aaron persuaded her to go looking for Inigo.

Paula Myo is an agent for ANA:Governance. Centuries ago she had been an investigator within the Serious Crimes Directorate. The Starflyer War had only made her life more hectic.

Oscar Monroe is the Martyr. He had given his life to defeat the Starflyer. Centuries later he had been relifed. Now he is assisting Paula by finding the Second Dreamer.

Justine is the daughter of Gore Burnelli and mother of Kazimir, the Supreme Commander of the Commonwealth Navy. She is living near the Wall and observing the Void.

Marius is an agent of the Accelerator faction of ANA. He has provided Living Dream with Ultra drives and other services to promote their migration into the Void. He is probably going to ask a favor from them at some point.

The Delivery Man is an agent of the Conservative faction of ANA. Lately he has been doing some extra tasks, mostly checking on the actions of Marius.

Troblum is a physicist and a Starflyer collector. He has also worked secretly for the Accelerator faction. He has decided to vanish from the galaxy, but first he has to move his collection.

Araminta is a divorcee living in Colwyn City on Viotia. She has been refurbishing apartments and selling them to various buyers. She is involved with a multiple person, one mind and about fifty bodies. She is also the Second Dreamer. Araminta's last dream denied the Living Dream migration into the Void.

In this story, Justine is fleeing from Centurion Station as the Void expands. All the species on the planet are doing the same. She gains the Silverbird -- an Ultra drive starship -- just before the station starts to crumble.

As the Silverbird hovers above the planet, Justine decides to enter the Void itself to negotiate some sort of agreement with the Nucleus. She asks her father to announce her intentions and to beg assistance from the Second Dreamer. Gore broadcasts a call on Viota to request aid for his daughter.

Araminta returns to her apartment and hides from the Ellezelin paramilitary troops searching for her. Oscar and a few Knights Guardian team is also onplanet searching for her. The populace of Colwyn City are beginning to fight back against the invading troops.

Araminta observes Gore's plea and works out a way to dream to a Skylord to request their help without alerting Living Dream. She explains the presence of Justine and asks for her admittance into the Void. The Void extrudes a portal and takes Justine within itself.

Troblum visits Stubsy Florac on Sholapur. He calls Paula to tell her where to meet him. Then Cat lets him know that has taken control of the situation.

Paula is already present on Sholapur and arrives at the mansion soon after receiving Troblum's call. She is just is time to force Cat to flee and to allow Troblum to escape. All she is left with is the dead and dying.

Aaron, Inigo and Corrie-Lyn are in a ground crawler fleeing the imminent implosion of Hanko. The surface is breaking up, forming rifts in the ice. Eventually they come to a giant rift. Aaron gets out to examine the fissure and finds it to be a giant cliff. Then Inigo fires on the ledge and drops Aaron down the cliff.

Kazimir sends a River-class starship -- the Yenisey -- to deal with the Ocisen fleet. The ship crew pulls the Ocisen flagship from hyperspace. Then a spherical starship unveils and fires on the Yenisey.

Meanwhile, Edeard is fighting the gangs in Makkathran city. He soon discovers that some ruling families are involved with the gangs. Then he finds a girl that he wants to marry.

This tale features even more of Edeard's story within the Void. In the outside universe, the Living Dream finds themselves even more in debt to the Accelerator faction. ANA:Governance and the less disruptive factions are dismayed at the extent of the Accelerator conspiracy.

This story has the common traits of most meganovels. It has over 700 pages of narrative and a timeline. But it does not have a Dramatis Personae, a serious omission. The principal characters are listed above, but many more play their roles within this tale.

One begins to question the nature of the Void. The story interjects some unusual features inside of the huge singularity. Maybe it is a Firstlife postphysical reality.

Nonetheless, the plot is quite interesting. It twists and turns, with many unexpected events. The final volume of this trilogy is coming in 2010. Read and enjoy!

Highly recommended for Hamilton fans and for anyone else who enjoys tales of interstellar cultures, cultural diversity, and determined heroines.

-Arthur W. Jordin
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13 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I wanted to love this book, January 5, 2009
This review is from: The Temporal Void (Paperback)
I read Temporal Void over a few days this Christmas, and have been looking forward to it since finishing Dreaming Void a year ago.

I wanted so much to give this 5 stars, in the end I rated it a 4 since the Commonwealth parts are well written and exciting, but it's barely a 4 and if I weren't such a fan of Hamilton's myriad of Commonwealth characters I'd have given it a 3.

My main issue is that the Void dreams of Edeards adventures are just far too long, as I recall at least two of them are about a hundred pages. I found myself reading the first dozen pages of each dream and counting the pages to the end of the chapter, seriously considering skipping them, I had to force myself the read these, a tragedy for a Hamilton fan. The dreams seem pedestrian compared to events outside the void, and are very slow at building the Waterwalker character in a rather predictable coming of age type of way.

Several things could have been incorporated in to the Commonwealth arcs of the story but seem to have been sacrificed for the dream arc to make this book about the same size as Dreaming Void. For example the greater population of the Commonwealth seem to be strangely unconcerned about an impending alien invasion to stop the Pilgrimage, and I would loved to have read more about how the Commonwealth has evolved since the Prime war.

I really like Hamilton's work, and hope Evolutionary Void is more satisfying then this. Of course, I'll still buy the book whatever.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good science fiction. Good fantasy. A solid successor to the first volume of the trilogy., December 15, 2011
By 
Solipso (Los Angeles, CA United States) - See all my reviews
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This is the second in Peter F. Hamilton's new trilogy: THE DREAMING VOID, THE TEMPORAL VOID, and THE EVOLUTIONARY VOID. Having just started the third volume, I can't say much about it, but each of the first two were solid reads. In a sense they give you double for your money, two stories for the price of one. One story is futuristic space opera, with hard-hitting high-tech action sequences and supercharged imagination. The second story--composed of chapters called "Inigo's Dreams"--is fantasy, though paranormal mental powers substitute for magic.

If you're a science fiction fan, do not be bigoted against fantasy. If you're a fantasy fan, do not be bigoted against science fiction. You don't have to be a country bumpkin to appreciate fantasy, and you don't have to be a physics major to appreciate science fiction.

If you follow the exploits of Thor, Superman, Captain America, Batman, et al, you should be pleased that THE TEMPORAL VOID has a superhero. He goes by the name "Waterwalker." Though he may not be as powerful as the water walker that Christians allegedly believe in, he can be mighty impressive. I don't want to spoil things by revealing exactly what those powers are and when and how they appear, but rest assured, the powers are there.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Huge disappointment, June 10, 2010
By 
Dr. Jan (Land of Enchantment) - See all my reviews
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What a let down from the wonderfully exciting, inventive, diverse and complex first book. Just the relationship of Araminta and the Boveys has more depth than this entire volume. Here her claim to fame is hiding in an appliance, and finding the Silfen paths. And the Dreams, rather than being the tantalizing bait that excites desire for the Pilgrimage, take over and crowd out the context in which they matter, namely the intricate politics of the world outside the Void. Compared to the latter, the Waterwalkers exploits seem naive and adolescent. It feels like Hamilton got bored, is coasting, or simply did not have anywhere near as much creative energy involved this time around. I'm hoping that the third volume will return us to the finely woven multidimensionality of the first, because I really enjoy, and like, the plot and characters when they are given room to breath.
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26 of 38 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Comme Ci Comme Ca, April 5, 2009
By 
Daniel Jeffries "buddha379" (San Diego, CA United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Temporal Void (Void Trilogy) (Hardcover)
Man, I really wanted to like this book, but it's just so-so. The first one was a lot of fun, if you skipped the "dream" chapters. The dream chapters, as many have noted, are garbage. They're boring, long, and frankly cheesy. At best they are cliche fantasy drivel. Why anyone who lived in the modern hyper advanced sci-fi world that Hamilton describes would want leave that and move to the bass-akwards world of the Void, I will never know. I'm a sci-fi reader, why would I ever find some backwoods world fascinating? I suppose you can chalk it up to religious zealots being their usual crazy selves, but even that is a stretch.

The book jacket describes the Void as an idyllic paradise, but it's not even close. If it were, the premise of the book would work beautifully. Everyone would want to go there to escape the pressure of the modern world. But as Hamilton paints it, it's a world that has ancient technology, where petty thugs rule, and violence and social inequality are the norm. It's feudal. Why would anyone want that life you ask? Beats me. I was willing to go with it in the first book. In fact, since the dream sequences were so short, I just started skimming them in a few minutes, reading the first page and the last few pages and eventually not even reading them at all. You know what? The book really moved after that! Because the world outside the world was so fascinating, I was willing to accept the absurd premise that a whole faction of humans wanted to move to the Void, which would trigger a war with a powerful alien race and the Void's expansion, which would slowly ear the galaxy.

Unfortunately, the second book is full of dream sequences that eat up half of the book. Guess what? The suck even worse, but now they're longer and skipping them meant I skipped half the book. I also started to notice something about half way through: I was no longer willing to suspend my disbelief that anyone would want to go to that backwards world and it started to ruin everything. I kept hoping this paradise would show itself, that the Void world would transform from a world of petty rivalries and thugs to something wonderful. It never did. Because I could no longer suspend my disbelief, I started reading it with a much more critical eye and its flaws became more and more apparent. Two problems become immensely clear when you start looking closely.

The first is that there is really not a single new character in the book, if you read the far superior Pandora's Star and Judas Unchained, you know most of them. Since I loved those books, I automagically transferred my love of those characters to the new books, but as this second book started to fall apart for me, I realized that the new books really don't really add anything to those characters, or at least not much to them. So basically they are just comfortable and familiar, but they bring nothing new to the table. The second dreamer character and her boyfriend are fascinating, but they're not on stage enough and eventually she jettisons her boyfriend to run from living dream and with that, jettisons most of what made her interesting, which is her near conversion to Multiplism, a surgery that makes a single personality into a group of people. What a fascinating concept! But sadly, it is abandoned in this book and she never makes the conversion to join her multiple boyfriend.

The second problem is that nothing happens in this book. The plot doesn't move forward much. The Living dream movement hunts the second dreamer and the aliens "prepare" to attack for hundreds of pages. Oh and the surprise allies of the hostile aliens are obvious from the jump, so there is no mystery or surprise when they are revealed. Nobody really attacks, which makes me wonder why I shouldn't have just skipped this book and gotten to the action in last one, which will hopefully move the plot along. Oh yeah and Paula "discovers" that the Cat is loose again. So what? We already knew that, since Hamilton shows us a scene with the Cat in the last book. That means Paula spends about 100 pages uncovering a "mystery" that we already know the answer to. Horrible.

At his best Hamilton is a fantastic world builder. He gives us fascinating concepts and big galaxy spanning space opera. Unfortunately, at his worst, his plots just don't work. The Night's Dawn trilogy almost ruined Hamilton for me. It started off fantastic and then the horrible plot of the dead coming back to life comes out. I threw it down in disgust. Pandora's Star and Judas Unchained redeemed him for me. Those books, while slow at times, made me keep coming back and finished with a satisfying crescendo. The Void trilogy, so far, is somewhere in the middle. The first books was great, if you skip the stupid dream sequences, the second one is middling at best, but you'll probably finish it anyway, like I did. Hopefully the last one lifts it back up where it belongs. And here's hoping they just obliterate the stupid Void and all of it's petty little inhabitants with some super secret galaxy buster bomb! Go Raiel! Stop that lame Void! While they're at it they can throw Jar Jar Binks in there first and then blow it all up, single handedly wiping out two series killing abominations in one foul swoop. A man can dream can't he?!? :)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Book two of the trilogy is fast paced & of the caliber expected of P.F. Hamilton. Thankfully much better than the first book., December 18, 2013
By 
M. Nichols (Telluride, CO) - See all my reviews
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i have been an avid scifi reader since i was a child. i have literally dontated all the books that make up the science fiction section at our community library. that said and after reading dozens upon dozens of authors and hundreds of books i find it disturbing that some authors just to make a quick buck will do whatever it takes to get three books out of one regardless the consequences. the first book in the series the dreaming void was a total disappointment. you can read the first forty pages and immediately jump to this book the second without losing anything. the dreaming void is fluff, filler and a total waste of the reader's time. as for the temporal void it starts off on a very good foot indeed. the second installment in the series begins on a high note with events unfolding and characters which do matter in a storyline which ties in well with pandora's star and judas unchained. it is captivating, drawing on characters and stories begun in his earlier series of books the commonwealth saga (not the dreaming void). how it ends? i am not there yet but at the half way point i feel confident enough in this book to go ahead and put up a review now. the temporal void is a well paced edge of your seat science fiction novel most will enjoy greatly. this is a "three" part series so i felt it important to include a bit on book one. as for the third in the series the evolutionary void, i can only hope it is as good or better than the temporarl void has been thus far.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars He Finally Lost Me on This One, June 30, 2012
By 
R. P. Cotta Jr. (Modoc County, California) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
My rating of this work at "one star" is its first and only "one star" rating. The reason I rate this book so low is that, first, it was largely boring; and, second, because Hamilton abandons the type of first-class science fiction he gave us in the Commonwealth Saga, or the Reality Dysfunction, and opts instead to fill much of the second installment in this trilogy with tawdry sexual exploitation.

In the first volume, "The Dreaming Void," the offending character was Araminta. In "The Temporal Void," the main sexual acrobat has become Edeard, to the point that it detracts not only from his character development, but from the plot as well.

If this wasn't enough to deter me from finishing the series, it was apparent that Hamilton was getting paid by the word. How many 250 word descriptions of every doorway in town does a novel need? Although the author does manage to thicken his plot, he does so at such a plodding rate that I lost interest.

I doubt I read the third in this series. I'd recommend that anybody considering starting the series may want to just skip it. It's really just not that good.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Go Hog Wild, May 6, 2011
By 
watzizname "watzizname" (Murfreesboro, Tennessee) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
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The second volume (middle third) of a 2041-page novel, The Void Trilogy. The first seven chapters and the first seven `Dreams' were published as The Dreaming Void (DV). Here the chapter numbering starts over, 1-5, but the `Dreams' continue in sequence, 8-12. Both the chapters and the `Dreams' are a bit better than in DV: chapters, 3¼ stars; `Dreams,' 4¼; overall 3¾ rounded to 4.

Before you begin The Temporal Void (TV), I very strongly urge you to read Pandora's Star (PS), Judas Unchained (JU), and DV in that order, because you will be lost in JU if you haven't read PS, lost in DV if you haven't read both PS and JU, and lost in TV if you haven't read PS, JU, and DV; and I doubt not that you will be lost in The Evolutionary Void (EV) if you haven't read all four of the above.

For the most part the story is compelling, albeit it drags occasionally, and some of the `science' seems like an attempt to sound `scientific' by one largely ignorant of science. I would have to classify this as science-fantasy, rather than science-fiction. By comparison, L. E. Modesitt, in his mostly excellent fantasy saga of Recluce*, seems much more conversant with real science! But if you can suspend disbelief, you can enjoy a pretty good tale, with interesting aliens, and two hitherto (as far as I know) unheard-of methods of interstellar travel: Most everyone takes the railroad train thru wormholes, but some walk the Silfen paths (distant cousin, perhaps, of the Egger Route^) between the stars.

Other reviewers have adequately discussed the events of TV, so why repeat here what they wrote, or add spoilers?

Readers would be greatly aided if each book contained a listing of the cast of characters, and a map of the galaxy showing the locations of the action, and local maps of those locations.

watziznayme@gmail.com

* See Magi'i of Cyador (The Saga of Recluce) and 15 sequels.
^ See The Sorceress of Karres
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The Temporal Void (Void Trilogy)
The Temporal Void (Void Trilogy) by Peter F. Hamilton (Hardcover - March 24, 2009)
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