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The Third Man [Blu-ray] (1949)

Joseph Cotten , Orson Welles , Carol Reed  |  NR |  Blu-ray
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (507 customer reviews)

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Product Details

  • Actors: Joseph Cotten, Orson Welles
  • Directors: Carol Reed
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, Closed-captioned, Dolby, Subtitled, Widescreen, Black & White
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: Spanish
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: LIONSGATE
  • DVD Release Date: September 14, 2010
  • Run Time: 105 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (507 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B003ULW74S
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #13,012 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Third Man [Blu-ray]" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

THE THIRD MAN is a British cinematic icon: from director Carol Reed, author Graham Greene and starring Joseph Cotten, Alida Valli and Orson Welles. Set in post-war Vienna, the film noir features some of cinema's most memorable set pieces --- the chase through the sewers, the enormous ferris wheel, the elm-lined cemetery...and Anton Karas' zither score, a worldwide phenomenon in itself. THE THIRD MAN is a swirling blend of thriller, romance, mystery and war film that was nominated for three Oscars(R) and named to the AFI's Top 100 Movies List.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
254 of 281 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great surrealist drama of truth and loyalth February 17, 2000
By smarmer
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
It was with great anticipation that I viewed The Third Man recently. I had last seen it nearly 25 years earlier. At the earlier viewing I was impressed with the atmospheric treatment of Vienna and the mystery surrounding Joseph Cotton's search for the truth about his friend Harry (Orson Wells). However, though I then thought of it as a very fine movie, I did not think it would rank in my top 20. Now I see what I missed as a younger person. I can also see why this film would rank as number one on a British list of greatest films of the 20th century.
The film is a surreal examination of the tension between loyalty, love, and friendship on the one hand, and truth and justice on the other. The Viennese are suffused with the cynicism of a destroyed continent and damaged culture. The British know only about the truth and justice side of the equation. The American writer of simple westerns still is naïve enough to care about friendship and truth, and follows both wherever they lead. At the same time, Carol Reed scarcely shoots a scene in which there are right angles. Nearly everything is tilted. Close-ups of faces exaggerate their features. The black and white of the film emphasizes the shadowy nature of the story and its moral underpinnings.
At first Holly Martins (Cotton) thinks he is helping his best friend, Harry Lime (Wells). At the same time he becomes Harry's rival for the woman, Anna. When Harry realizes that Holly has discovered his true evil scheme, Harry has a chance to murder Holly and make it look like an accident. What stops him? Friendship? And why does Harry accept Holly's invitation to meet? In the penultimate scene in the underground sewer tunnels, does Holly fire the final and fatal shot, or does Harry kill himself?
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74 of 79 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must have DVD for film noir fans! July 28, 2000
Format:DVD
I have always seen inferior prints of this film until I found this Criterion DVD and I must say, it was like watching a completely different film. The crisp b&w photography has been restored to the original pristine quality and one can easily see why this film took home the Oscar for best cinematography. The sound is also superb. The DVD is loaded with extra features such as the original opening monologue to the British release (voiced by director Carol Reed), a reading of the novel by author Graham Greene, archival footage of the sewer system "police" in Vienna (which plays a significant part in the film), and numerous stills with tantalizing behind the scenes information (like the fact that Orson Welles was so put off by working in the actual sewers that he refused to return and the crew had to build a sewer set at Shepperton Studios). There are many other extras as well, actually too many to remember. Bravo to Criterion for their amazing work on this classic film!
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63 of 67 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ok, but........ October 7, 2010
Format:Blu-ray|Verified Purchase
The Studio Canal blu ray version of the Third Man is an ok transfer--but not as good as the version released by Criterion Collection. Having purchased the Studio Canal version, and then subsequently finding a new copy of the Criterion Collection version, it is apparent that each has used a print from a different source. In regards to the Studio Canal version, I noticed some less than stellar frames near the end of the film----where Joseph Cotton is leaning at the road side, watching Alida Valli walk by. In any case, the Studio Canal version isn't bad and I wouldn't discourage its purchase. But if you love this film and want the best print available---try to locate a copy of the Criterion Collection---before they completely disappear.
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109 of 126 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars New Release of the Greatest British Film (BFI) April 13, 2007
Format:DVD
According to Criterion, this 2 disc release should contain:
- All-new, restored high-definition digital transfer
- Video introduction by writer-director Peter Bogdanovich
- Two audio commentaries: one by filmmaker Steven Soderbergh and screenwriter Tony Gilroy, and one by film scholar Dana Polan
- Shadowing "The Third Man" (2005), a ninety-minute feature documentary on the making of the film
- Abridged recording of Graham Greene's treatment, read by actor Richard Clarke
- "Graham Greene: The Hunted Man," an hour-long, 1968 episode of the BBC's Omnibus series, featuring a rare interview with the novelist
- Who Was the Third Man? (2000), a thirty-minute Austrian documentary featuring interviews with cast and crew
- The Third Man on the radio: the 1951 "A Ticket to Tangiers" episode of The Lives of Harry Lime series, written and performed by Orson Welles; and the 1951 Lux Radio Theatre adaptation of The Third Man
- Illustrated production history with rare behind-the-scenes photos, original UK press book, and U.S. trailer
- Actor Joseph Cotten's alternate opening voice-over narration for the U.S. version
- Archival footage of postwar Vienna
- A look at the untranslated foreign dialogue in the film
- Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing
PLUS: A booklet featuring essays by Luc Sante, Charles Drazin, and Philip Kerr -- Also: a web-exclusive essay on Anton Karas by musician John Doe

AUDIO: Dolby Digital 1.0 signal on 5.1-channel sound systems / two-channel playback.
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57 of 65 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No wonder it tops the British Best 100 list February 26, 2000
By smarmer
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
It was with great anticipation that I viewed The Third Man recently. I had last seen it nearly 25 years earlier. At the earlier viewing I was impressed with the atmospheric treatment of Vienna and the mystery surrounding Joseph Cotton's search for the truth about his friend Harry (Orson Wells). However, though I then thought of it as a very fine movie, I did not think it would rank in my top 20. Now I see what I missed as a younger person. I can also see why this film would rank as number one on a British list of greatest films of the 20th century.
The film is a surreal examination of the tension between loyalty, love, and friendship on the one hand, and truth and justice on the other. The Viennese are suffused with the cynicism of a destroyed continent and damaged culture. The British know only about the truth and justice side of the equation. The American writer of simple westerns still is naïve enough to care about friendship and truth, and follows both wherever they lead. At the same time, Carol Reed scarcely shoots a scene in which there are right angles. Nearly everything is tilted. Close-ups of faces exaggerate their features. The black and white of the film emphasizes the shadowy nature of the story and its moral underpinnings.
At first Holly Martins (Cotton) thinks he is helping his best friend, Harry Lime (Wells). At the same time he becomes Harry's rival for the woman, Anna. When Harry realizes that Holly has discovered his true evil scheme, Harry has a chance to murder Holly and make it look like an accident. What stops him? Friendship? And why does Harry accept Holly's invitation to meet? In the penultimate scene in the underground sewer tunnels, does Holly fire the final and fatal shot, or does Harry kill himself?
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Oldie
Fabulous 50's movie. Even though filmed in black and white, great cinematography. Orson Welles is fabulous.
Published 8 days ago by Mel C.
1.0 out of 5 stars One Star
Bootleg version didn't work with my blue ray machine or my laptop. Total ripp off!
Published 9 days ago by N. Phos
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
One of the greatest films of the twentieth century. I'll take it over Citizen Kane anyday.
Published 15 days ago by D. Jenkins
1.0 out of 5 stars Don't bother
All of the characters in the movies were losers of some sort - liars, cheats, fakers, untrue spouse, and the list goes on.
Don't bother renting the movie. Read more
Published 17 days ago by whiskey tango foxtrot
5.0 out of 5 stars An old film that is still excellent.
I agree with the vast number of reviewers who found this black and white film to be excellent. It has a feeling of being an out-of-date film; its style is outdated; one would not... Read more
Published 17 days ago by Israel Drazin
5.0 out of 5 stars Among the best of the best
In my opinion, one of the two or three best movies ever made.
Cotton, Welles, Valli, and Howard are all splendid.
And dig that Anton Karras music (Wiki him).
Published 18 days ago by Peter M. Ross, Ph.D.
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
I am really glad I chose the Criterion Collection version of this movie. The quality is great.
Published 20 days ago by Ginny or Paul Lyman
3.0 out of 5 stars This DVD would not play in any of the DVD ...
This DVD would not play in any of the DVD players that I own. I had to throw it away.
Published 21 days ago by Rob Wagner
5.0 out of 5 stars A fine example of Europeans trying their hand at film noir
Everything about this film is engaging. Welles, Cotton and Howard carry it off with elan, especially Welles' cuckoo clock speech.
Published 24 days ago by studioprod.
2.0 out of 5 stars The movie is great. But I didn't want the VHS I wanted ...
The movie is great. But I didn't want the VHS I wanted the DVD and I put in a request to exchange it and have heard nothing from Jersey Girl, the people who sent it! Read more
Published 1 month ago by Rae Porter
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The Third Man Blu-ray Case
Criterion caught on that people hated the cardboard Digipak cases so they started releasing new titles in the plastic cases around April 2009. Older titles continue to ship in the paper cases (except The Third Man, briefly).

In the case of The Third Man, they started replacing the paper cases... Read More
Nov 12, 2009 by James Goss |  See all 4 posts
Is "The Third Man" Studio Canal Collection Blu-ray in COLOR?
it is not colorized
Format: Closed-captioned, Dolby, Subtitled, Widescreen, Black & White
Sep 19, 2010 by nichtkomisch |  See all 3 posts
blu-ray edition coming
This forum IS for the BD edition.
Dec 15, 2008 by BubbaCoop |  See all 3 posts
Bootleg copies of "The Third Man"
Well the Criterion version is now out of print, so its no longer possible to buy it from Amazon. If you ordered the Criterion and received the StudioCanal edition, let them know and they'll probably refund you. As far as quality, the Criterion edition appears to have a better picture and arguably... Read More
Jul 12, 2011 by Quexos |  See all 2 posts
going out of print
thats why i just bought mine
Oct 28, 2009 by J. Fanning |  See all 5 posts
Voice over opening scene Be the first to reply
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