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The Thousand Year War in the Mideast: How It Affects You Today (An Uncle Eric Book) Paperback – May 1, 1999


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Product Details

  • Series: An Uncle Eric Book
  • Paperback: 268 pages
  • Publisher: Bluestocking Pr (May 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0942617320
  • ISBN-13: 978-0942617320
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.8 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #38,730 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 9 Up-Another in a series about world politics and economics. Before actually venturing into the text, it is best to read the "Author's Disclosure," wherein Maybury makes plain his admittedly biased view about current affairs. He states that he adheres to Juris Naturalism-the belief that natural laws supersede laws created by governments. While certain statements, and the tone of the book in general, may strike some as outlandish and inflammatory, the author's research is sound and he does not confuse the facts. Instead, he uses them to promote his belief that the Middle East, or, rather, "Chaostan," a term coined by "Uncle Eric," is headed for a major world war. Basically, Maybury asserts that European and American governments have been exploiting Islamic countries for centuries to further their own political and economic purposes. Now, these countries are starting to rebel; thus, a world war is inevitable. The book is replete with excerpts from his Early Warning Report newsletter, which is advertised at the end. Although this title is certainly not "mainstream" research, it definitely provides an easy-to-read argument for, as Maybury states, "liberty, free markets, and international neutrality." Black-and-white maps appear throughout.-Carol Fazioli, The Brearley School, New York City

Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

About the Author

Richard Maybury, also known as Uncle Eric, is a world renowned author, lecturer, and geopolitical analyst. He consults with business firms in the U.S. and Europe. Mr. Maybury is the former Global Affairs editor of "Moneyworld" and widely regarded as one of the finest free-market writers in America. Mr. Maybury s articles have appeared in "The Wall Street Journal", "USA Today", and other major publications. He has penned eleven books in the Uncle Eric series. His books have been endorsed by top business leaders, including former U.S. Treasury Secretary William Simon, and he has been interviewed on more than 250 radio and TV shows across America.

More About the Author

Richard Maybury, also known as Uncle Eric, is a world renowned author, lecturer, and geopolitical analyst. He consults with business firms in the U.S. and Europe. Mr. Maybury is the former Global Affairs editor of "Moneyworld" and widely regarded as one of the finest free-market writers in America. Mr. Maybury's articles have appeared in "The Wall Street Journal", "USA Today", and other major publications. He has penned eleven books in the Uncle Eric series. His books have been endorsed by top business leaders, including former U.S. Treasury Secretary William Simon, and he has been interviewed on more than 250 radio and TV shows across America.

Customer Reviews

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I think Maybury did an incredible job of tackling such weighty subject matter.
H. Anderson
This book has history actually starting in the 6th Century ,with the beginning of Islam and essentially overlooks everything before that.
J. Guild
Each one of Richard Maybury's books is a fast read and this one is no exception.
Bani Sodermark

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

71 of 74 people found the following review helpful By J. W. Deming on December 26, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Richard Maybury is a very rare bird. He can take a complex subject, such as why the US government is engaged in a war with radical Islam, and explain its root causes in simple, truthful terms. He is a tough, hardheaded, fearless thinker who is unafraid to go past the facile explanations of the mainstream press and seek out the deeper causes of socio-political phenomena. Maybury relies on science, reason, and a penetrating study of history for his explanations. He is also an ex-military man with an astonishing grasp of military history and the current level of effectiveness of US armed forces
For instance, his analysis begins in the 8th century with the founding of Islam. He explains why the devastation visited upon the Islamic world by the European Crusades and the Mongol hordes of Genghis Khan in the 11th-13th centuries still exert a powerful influence on the peoples of the MidEast.
He also clearly identifies the theoretical basis of his reasoning, i.e., Austrian (free market) economics and the natural or "scientific" jurisprudence that underlies the evolutionary development of Common Law, the basis of American freedom. I was stunned by his ability to extract from his studies the two basic laws (stated in short, simple sentences) upon which every successful civilization is and has been based. He explains in another book how America's success derives from the founders' understanding of these two laws. He writes that he has never found anyone who disagrees with the rightness of these two laws...although the current American political state massively violates both every day.
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82 of 87 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 1, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I thought this book is a very useful read and does much to inform about the historical roots to the mess that is currently the Middle East. There are ancient hostilities and tensions that are beyond the understanding of many of the policy makers that determine the direction that nations take in the Middle East.
Maybury does an excellent job explaining 'why they hate us so' which was a seemingly unanswered question in the days after 911.
However, I felt that Maybury did great disservice to his readers by not explaining that the crusades were in response to hundreds of years of Muslim advance, often brutal and murderous in nature. All the countries we now know as Muslim countries were once considered Christian. Istanbul was once Constantinople, the seat of the Holy Roman Empire. Maybury paints the Muslims as innocent victims without presenting the more honest view that the Muslim religion was birthed in hostile, war like advance. Muhammed essentially conquered Mecca and Medina to make them Muslim; they did not convert voluntarily.
This oversight was quite disturbing because it is the oversight that one hears from the Muslim extremists. They often refer to the crusades without any reference to their own heritage of bloodshed.
While I tend to agree with his assertions about the role the USA should play in the Middle East, I feel that Maybury lacks a thorough knowledge of the religious ideology that drives the Muslim extremists who are seeking to become the norm.
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30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By H. Anderson on September 17, 2002
Format: Paperback
I found this book in a quest to find a fairly impartial discussion on the war in the Middle East. Over the years I have read about what ever was the current headline of the day but I had no appreciation for the intricacies and the longevity of the issues that have kept this part of the world at war for over a thousand years. Being born on American soil, a nation that is in its infancy by comparison to so much of the rest of the world, I had no context in which to even begin to understand what has fueled the fires of war and hatred for so many generations. I feel very lucky to have stumbled upon Richard Maybury's book. Instead of being put off by what seemed like a student textbook approach I was appreciative of his assumption that the reader knew almost nothing about the history and geography of this part of the world. Armed with a map and paper to make notes I tackled this book. Maybury uses a ptolomeic style of writing that is reassuring for the reader but the information is so complex that I found myself having to re-read sections and go back and refer to earlier sections of the book. This is not meant to discourage. I think Maybury did an incredible job of tackling such weighty subject matter.
Basically I came away believing with much conviction that America has no business being involved in the Middle East. Our involvement speaks to our arrogance as a country and our selfishness as a nation of consumers who upon finding our own oil reserves dwindling have jumped into the fray to try to gain control over as much oil as we can grab with both fists. Being a big fan of Daniel Quinn I was struck by Maybury's comments that our fears that the Middle East will not sell its oil to America do not justify our involvement because, after all, those people cannot 'eat' oil.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Bani Sodermark VINE VOICE on September 15, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is not the best way to learn about the history of the Middle East. Not if one wishes to learn in detail of what has happened and when. However, if one wanted to learn the why of these events, this book is invaluable. It provides a simple clear cut reason for a conflict that has been going on for more than a millenium and to which, even today, no end seems in sight.

Continuing in his favourite style of writing letters to his nephew, Chris, Richard Maybury applies the operation of his two basic laws on events that have shaped, and are still shaping the history of Europe over the last thousand years.

The two basic laws read as follows: 1) Do all you have agreed to do: 2) Do not encroach on another's property. Evidently, they are based on the equality of all human beings and oppose the use of force to wrest anything from anyone. As history is replete with power play, especially where emperors, kings and eventually governments are concerned, it is not difficult to see how the wanton abuse of these two laws, backfire on those authorities and organizations who do not adhere to them. In this book, Maybury begins by analyzing the Crusades, (Christian aggressors to the Holy Land, which was not their own and which they wanted to take by force), goes on to examining the authority of the Church, and finally ends up with a bird's eye view of European politics that led to World War I. Application of his logic on these diverse, seemingly unrelated events, makes their outcome almost self evident. Richard Maybury also speculates on the connection between the thousand year old animosity between the Western World (symbolized by America) and the Islamic World (represented by the Arab countries), leading onto the terrorist attack on Sept.
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