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The Ticket That Exploded: The Restored Text Paperback – April 8, 2014

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The Ticket That Exploded: The Restored Text + Nova Express: The Restored Text + The Soft Machine: The Restored Text (Cut-Up Trilogy)
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Editorial Reviews

Review

“In Mr. Burroughs’s hands writing reverts to acts of magic, as though he were making some enormous infernal encyclopedia of all the black impulses and acts that, once made, would shut away the fiends forever.”—The New York Times

“It is in books like The Ticket that Exploded that Burroughs seems to revel in a new medium for its own sake—a medium totally fantastic, spaceless, timeless, in which the normal sentence is fractured, the cosmic tries to push its way through bawdry, and the author shakes the reader as a dog shakes a rat.”—Anthony Burgess, author of A Clockwork Orange

“[Burroughs's] Swiftian vision of a processed, pre-packaged life, a kind of electro-chemical totalitarianism, often evokes the black laughter of hilarious horror.”—Playboy

“The power of his imagination often carries his comedy far into the buried recesses of the psyche.”—The New Republic

About the Author

William S. Burroughs (1914-1997) was the author of numerous novels, including "Junky," "Queer""Naked Lunch," "Nova Express," "The Ticket That Exploded," "The Soft Machine," and "The Wild Boys." He is considered one of the twentieth century's most radical, innovative, and influential writers, and a founding member of the Beat Generation.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Grove Press; 2 Revised edition (April 8, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802122094
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802122094
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.4 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #391,293 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 11, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book is the final word in cut-ups and Burroughs' tape experiments of the early 1960's. This is Burroughs' most beautifully written text, if somewhat overrepetitive at times. Moreso than in "Naked Lunch" or in "Nova Express," Burroughs fleshes out his ideas about language "being a virus from outer space," and looks forward to his essay, "The Electronic Revolution." This is a tough and uncompromising book, filled with beautiful nonsequitors, funny anecdotal tales, and plenty homoerotic sexual fantasies and realitease.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Alabaster Jones on February 23, 2013
Format: Paperback
Not only is it my favorite Burroughs novel, but it's also one of my favorite books that I've ever read. I read a lot of WSB's stuff when I was a teenager, and the "cut-up trilogy", of which this is the centerpiece, was the last of his work that I read... so I was well primed for it by the time I read it. I don't recommend starting here if you're new to Burroughs, as many of the motifs that he uses here might not make much sense to someone unfamiliar with his writing style or, indeed, his philosophy on life. If you've never read Burroughs before, I recommend starting with his autobiographical novel Junky, or possibly his Naked Lunch, for which he is most famous. If you've read him before and haven't read this one yet, then you definitely should read it.

Much of this book is repeated from the previous The Soft Machine, and is later repeated in Nova Express, but it seems to me that in this middle book of the trilogy, much of the text is in its original form here, and as such, this is the most easily accessible of them. The plot, such as it is, concerns itself with The Nova Mob, an intergalactic band of criminals intent on destroying the planet by means of various methods of mind control. The prose, however, is almost subliminal in its impact. Burroughs relies heavily on symbolism and wild imagery to get his point across, which, as best as I can surmise, is that our lives are like a tape recording that we can edit to our liking.. and if we don't then someone else is sure to.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 15, 1997
Format: Paperback
At last, a novel that makes ejaculation seem like a normal reaction to every situation. I get the feeling mr. Burroughs tried to include the word "ejaculate" twice on each page. When the word becomes a part of the book's personal vocabulary, you will either become a repulsed read-stopper, or you will have to accept it as something everyday and common in order to get through this nightmare.

You will also have to accept that the penis is an important feature when describing a man's physique, it often gets as much attention as the face and clothes. But by merciless repetition, all this seems natural, you get to regard ejacultating
in pain as normal as screaming. Mr. Burroughs certainly creates an alternative reality where nobody and nothing acts the way we expect.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Craig Tisdale on April 27, 2003
Format: Paperback
Out of the three books in Burroghs' "cut-up" trilogy (the soft machine, the ticket that exploded, and nova express) this i feel is the best and most creative. Included in this book are Ginsyn's tape recorder experiments which produce a psychological analogy for the way our brains opperate as well as an interesting pass-time for anyone who finds the concept of words being a virus of the mind of any interest.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 20, 1998
Format: Paperback
It is difficult to attach the concept of attainment and climax to Burrough's texts, the act of reading as a sexual encounter is never teleoligcial: as an historical moment, and these moments lace in and out of his work, The Ticket That Exploded marks the final move in his journey through Nova control lines and the elucidation of techniques of subversion. The text marks a cleft and an absence rather than a revolution, which Burrough's shows to be an act always already ingested by Nova logic. "Nova" itself signs the problematics of the new and original. The words writhe uneasily in gestures of self canabalism, and indeed here is one of the few places where the author speaks explicitly of repetition. Deleuze reading Burroughs...Burrroughs reading Deleuze? Neither. The Law is moving in - This is Nova Heat. Once the movement to Difference occurs, and to my mind this is located as a singularity in the last quarter of the text, the text is freed and seethes in a vertical spiral about any singular point in the work. This is a horizontal play of words in which chance regulates a different logic of alterity. We as readers are free to pin the work at any point with the stabbing singualrity of an "I" (the nails from a crucified God?). We are free to chose our own Sils Marias. This work is a monstruous and ephemeral monument to the hollow idols of our Humanity. It is a payground of chance. "do you get the picture" Read the text and feel yourself re-written. "Even better than the real thing? There is no real thing - Maya Maya - it's all show business"
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 29, 1997
Format: Paperback
That's all I remember from this book is something about a blue boy with a green penis or vice versa.That and Burroughs notion that we should all go to parties with prerecorded conversations and simply allow our tape players to talk to each other because it isn't as if we are having conversations. I remember this because it ruined the next three or four parties I went to because I kept thinking that everyone might as well have brought their taperecorders because they are all talking about what was already being talked about. These theories come at the end of the book. Up until then there is a lot of words which sound good together but the Cut & Paste experiment really did not do Burroughs good
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