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The Tin Woodman of Oz: A Faithful Story of the Astonishing Adventure Undertaken by the Tin Woodman, Assisted by Woot the Wanderer, the Scarecrow of Oz, and Polychrome, the Rainbow's Daughter Hardcover – May 26, 1999

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The Tin Woodman of Oz: A Faithful Story of the Astonishing Adventure Undertaken by the Tin Woodman, Assisted by Woot the Wanderer, the Scarecrow of Oz, and Polychrome, the Rainbow's Daughter + Glinda of Oz (Oz, 14) + The Magic of Oz (Books of Wonder)
Price for all three: $56.19

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

L. Frank Baum (1856-1919) published The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in 1900 and received enormous, immediate success. Baum went on to write seventeen additional novels in the Oz series. Today, he is considered the father of the American fairy tale. His stories inspired the 1939 classic film The Wizard of Oz, one of the most widely viewed movies of all time.

Michael Sieben is a professional designer and illustrator, primarily within the sub-culture of skateboarding, whose work has been exhibited and reviewed worldwide as well as featured in numerous illustration anthologies. He is a staff writer and illustrator for Thrasher magazine, and a weekly columnist for VICE.com. He is also a founding member of Okay Mountain Gallery and Collective in Austin, Texas, as well as the cofounder of Roger Skateboards. The author of There's Nothing Wrong with You (Hopefully), he lives and works in Austin.



John R. Neill was born in Philadelphia in 1877. In 1904, at the age of twenty-six, Neill received his first major book assignment, as illustrator for The Marvelous Land of Oz. From then until his death in 1943, Neill would illustrate over forty Oz books, including three he wrote himself. Today, his fabulous illustrations are synonymous with Oz.
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 and up
  • Series: Books of Wonder
  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (May 26, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0688149766
  • ISBN-13: 978-0688149765
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 0.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #88,561 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 15, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Like all of L. Frank Baum's Oz books, "The Tin Woodman of Oz" has an effortless sense of memorability about it which not all Oz authors have been able to attain. It raises more interesting philosophical problems about identity and the nature of love than do most of the Oz books, and is, like most of Baum's writing, gently humorous and optimistic about the world and human nature. Some of the plot twists in the latter part of the book, which concern the repercussions of Nick Chopper's transformation into a Tin Woodman, may be disturbing for some young readers; but the questions these events raise are fascinating and could lead children into interesting discussions with their parents about what makes a person himself. Books of Wonder's beautiful edition includes all of John R. Neill's illustrations, including the endpapers and the color plates; this is the only one of the "Famous Forty" Oz books to include illustrations of the Wicked Witch of the East, of the Tin Woodman's long-lost love Nimmie Amee, and of the Tin Woodman himself as he appeared when he was a normal "meat" man. All of Baum's books are children's classics, and "The Tin Woodman of Oz" is no exception.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Lee Edward Fodi on June 19, 2006
Format: Hardcover
This book, for some reason, was one of the hardest for me to lay my hands on as a child. As an avid Oz, this was pure torture. I had always loved the Tin Woodman, so I was desperate to read a book dedicated to him. Finally, on my 11th birthday, I was given the book by a friend of mine...and, after all the anticipation, I am happy to report that the story did not disappoint. I was immediately captivated by the cover of the book, for--what was this--TWO tin men? That was all the encouragement I needed to immediately abandon reality and plunge into this book. Well, after reading this tale again as an adult, The Tin Woodman of Oz stands up as one of Baum's best. In a somewhat rare turn for the author, he gazes back upon a past book of Oz to explore the history of one of his all-time favorite characters--and he does his usual marvelous job. My favorite scene is the adventure with the giantess, Yoop, but this adventure really starts to thump like the heart of our favorite tin man when our heroes meet none other than the Tin Soldier. This is probably the darkest of all of the Oz books; after all, Baum describes the building of a man from the discarded parts of another! But it's always Baum's charming style that wins over and, somehow, he can handle what seems to be a macabre subject matter in a delightful fashion. As a boy, it was a great pleasure to read a book that starred an all male trio (very unusual for Baum) and I'm sure this contributed to making this Oz adventure one of my favorites of the series.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By ScrawnyPunk on October 28, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I read this book to my son over the course of a couple of weeks (a chapter a night) and we both enjoyed it. The story is a journey, as usual, in which the chief characters overcome a number of obstacles prior to returning to Oz for a happy conclusion. The chief motivator is Woot the Wanderer, a munchkin boy who helps convince the Tin Woodman and the Scarecrow to make a journey to the Woodman's old sweetheart and make amends for abandoning her by accident in the original book (he rusted, you know). The journey takes them into a shape-shifting confrontation with a mysterious giantess, brings them into contact new and unusual animals in the wild, introduces the Woodman's romantic rival (and fellow Tin Man), and resolves itself in an interesting manner when both Tin Men meet the object of their former affections.

Having read all but Frank Baum's final Oz book, I can say that the Tin Woodman is one of my favorites and easily the best in the series since the Patchwork Girl. The plot structure is very clear and Baum's usual lessons on simple morals and honor fit well within the context of the book, especially those regarding faithfulness and honor. Most interestingly, he tackles a fairly complicated philosophical question towards the end of the book - what is man, what part makes him a man, and how does he retain his identity if those parts leave him? Even if your children won't pick up on that slight complication, they will enjoy the rest of the story.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Daniel D. Ortega on September 16, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a great bedtime reading book for a younger child. The story moves along at a good clip, the characters are interesting and weird, the language used is within the range of kids as young as four, there are lots of really nice illustrations, and the book is a high quality product (hardback with dust jacket). The book is also fairly long, so the story can play itself out over days or weeks (assuming you read one chapter per night). This is the sort of book your kid will keep and pass on to their children.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By frumiousb VINE VOICE on October 28, 2007
Format: Hardcover
The Tin Woodman of Oz (book 12)is easily the most surreal of the Oz books. While they all have a pretty healthy dose of strange locked inside their pages, this book is so odd that I can distinctly remember that it disturbed me as a child. It was not one of the Oz books that I returned to over and over. Reading it again made it clear just what was so strange.

The main idea of The Tin Woodman of Oz is to explore the back story of Nick Chopper, the Tin Woodman. As you may or may not know or remember, Nick Chopper started life as an ordinary sort of flesh-and-blood fellow who made a living cutting down trees. Unfortunately for him, he fell in love with Nimmie Amee-- the servant girl of the Wicked Witch of the East. In order to stop him from taking her hired help away, the witch enchants his axe so that he cuts himself every time he tries to chop down a tree. Bit by bit, Nick Chopper removes his own limbs with the enchanted axe. Fortunately for him, a tinsmith named Ku Klip is able to replace each limb with a tin replacement. In the end, there is nothing left of poor Nick Chopper except the tin replacement parts. Unfortunately, Ku Klip had forgotten to give him a heart. He rusts in the forest, and once Dorothy finds him then everything after that is history?

Or is it? In the opening of book 12, a small boy named Woot the Wanderer appears at the court of the Tin Man's castle in Winkie country. Why? he asks, has the now-emperor of the Winkies never returned to find his true love Nimmie Amee and make her the queen? Excellent question, it appears. The group sets off on their adventure to find the lovely Miss Amee and offer her the man of her dreams who is now restored.

As in all Oz books, there are a great variety of subplots.
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