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The Titanic: Historiography and Annotated Bibliography (Bibliographies and Indexes in World History, 53) Unknown Binding – September, 2001


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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • ISBN-10: 0313016666
  • ISBN-13: 978-0313016660
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

Editorial Reviews

Book Description

Provides a useful guide to the literature on the most dramatic marine disaster of modern times.

--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

EUGENE L. RASOR is Professor of History Emeritus at Emory and Henry College. He is the author of 11 historiographical and bibliographical surveys published by Greenwood Press. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By M. Tennaro on November 18, 2001
Format: Hardcover
The author is a professional bibliographer with some 11 bibliographies to his credit. As such, his Titanic bibliography has both the strengths and weaknesses of someone knowledgeable in bibliography, if not necessarily in Titanic; or, at least that was my impression.
The work is split into three parts, a historical narrative, descriptive subject lists, and the annotated book list.
Parts one and two are quite well done with extensive descriptive text in general references, history, background and context. The subject lists are also extensive covering in excellent detail such diverse items as paintings, sermons, poems and memorabilia. There is excellent discussion of movies, museums, societies and journals, amongst others. An exception is the Internet, which is very poorly represented.
The book list, however, is the most important part of any bibliography, and here things are a bit more problematic. There are indexes for authors and subjects, but not for titles, for example. Another surprising omission is the lack of isbn numbers. Also missing are illustrations of any kind; there are no photos of book covers or title pages that one would expect to find in this kind of work. Neither will you find a guide to identifying first printings, nor a guide to values.
Some of the issues that crop up from, what I assume is the author's inexperience with the subject include a few humorous mistakes, such as identifying William Barnes' book as a biography of Thomas Andrews. Also Martin Gardner's book is identified as a pro-psychic work, when it is quite the opposite. A few other quirks include identifying Charles Lightoller as the ship's First Officer (he was actually the Second Officer); and the Carpathia's name gets mangled as Carpathian a few times in the text.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Titanic on March 22, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This book looked interesting, so I took a look inside at what it had to say about my favorite book, Ghosts of the Titanic. The bibliography and summary of Ghosts was entirely false and it is evident facts were not checked when it was written. The "reviewer" mentioned in the summary who apparently hoped Pellgrino's book would hit an iceberg was in fact sour after getting knocked off an expedition which was in favor of Charlie instead, and Pellegrino's relations with Ballard as well as his access to Walter Lord's wealth of information has been confirmed, even by the Titanic Historical Society.

If this one statement can be proven false, I shudder to think what else lies in this book that may also suffer at the hands of such easily disputable information.
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